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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Peter Cheese and Jan Hills

The purpose of the paper is to describe the relevance and application of insights from the field of neuroscience on practice and thinking of human resources (HRs).

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to describe the relevance and application of insights from the field of neuroscience on practice and thinking of human resources (HRs).

Design/methodology/approach

It draws on the experience, views and insights of the authors in providing the context, some of the key insights from neuroscience relevant to the field and examples of people management and development practices.

Findings

The paper reinforces the view of the relevance and importance of using better understanding of human behaviour through neuroscience to drive more effective people management and development practices.

Originality/value

Understanding and application of neuroscience insights to HR practices and processes is still in its early stages. The article challenges the need for a wider shift in thinking and philosophy across business to take a more human centred approach to address the shifts and challenges of the modern workplace and workforces.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Peter Cheese

There has been increasing attention given to the need to bring risk thinking into the field of HRM. The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of risk in a rapidly…

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Abstract

Purpose

There has been increasing attention given to the need to bring risk thinking into the field of HRM. The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of risk in a rapidly changing context, examines the responses being made and indicates the characteristics of resilient and adaptive organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a categorisation of risk. It uses the volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous metaphor to lay out the likely shape of imminent business risks, and the concept of adaptation to present a case that there is scope for effective responses.

Findings

The paper argues we are at inflexion point that will force businesses to re-examine how they do business in ways that will impact customer expectations, product enhancement, collaborative innovation and ultimately organisational forms. In order to manage and mitigate risk organisations need to understand corporate cultures, operating models and organisational constructs, leadership and governance, as well as the more traditional talent management practices and processes.

Practical implications

Key to achieving resilience will be a focus on behaviour and culture. These issues have to be brought to the heart of strategy and the business model of every organisation. Organisation cultures need to be developed based on trust and respect and the need to avoid risk blindness. We need to challenge the mindset that people can only be trusted within narrow confines of rules, or limits of authority.

Social implications

As we continue to develop more heterogeneous employment models – flexi-working, contractors, self-employed consultants, secondees, agency staff, interns and volunteers, outsourcing, partnering and even crowdsourcing – attention needs to be given to the implications for skills, learning and development and the challenges of aligning behaviours.

Originality/value

The paper brings together a range of imminent business risks to build the case that these risks of course have potentially profound impacts on people management, but that their solution also brings HRM thinking to the heart of strategies, cultures and business models.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Robert J. Thomas and Peter Cheese

The authors introduce an experience‐based approach offering a comprehensive new way of developing leaders. It knits together on‐the‐job experience, life experience, and

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Abstract

Purpose

The authors introduce an experience‐based approach offering a comprehensive new way of developing leaders. It knits together on‐the‐job experience, life experience, and specific skill development, rather than presenting employees with a smorgasbord of classes and programs that is tenuously linked (if it is linked at all) to career development, succession planning, or business objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors base their conclusions on previous Accenture research and their observations of leadership technology as used by organizations.

Findings

Advances in learning models, information technology, and leadership research strongly suggest that new approaches like experience‐based learning hold strong promise in helping companies meet the high performance challenge.

Research limitations/implications

The experience‐based approach bridges the gap between practice and performance through creative uses of information and communication technology. Research to validate and show the impact of the experience‐based approach compared to various alternatives would be welcome.

Practical implications

The experience‐based method can be adapted to the developmental needs and opportunities of leaders and potential leaders at all stages of their careers, and also to the changing needs of organizations operating in complex and uncertain environments. The goal of experience‐based leadership development is to equip employees to mine their experiences – continuously and intensively – for insight into what it takes to lead, what it takes to grow as a leader, and what it takes to cultivate the leader in others (peers and superiors as well as subordinates).

Originality/value

Today's challenge for organizations is to grow more leaders over a larger terrain and faster than ever before. Article explains how a program that uses learning models, information technology, and leadership research to link experience and leadership training can help companies produce higher quality leaders more efficiently.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Harold Scott, Peter Cheese and Susan Cantrell

Harley‐Davidson was keen to maintain its continual expansion, but was aware it needed to invest in its people in order to keep momentum high. The Accenture Human Capital…

Abstract

Harley‐Davidson was keen to maintain its continual expansion, but was aware it needed to invest in its people in order to keep momentum high. The Accenture Human Capital Development Framework enabled the company to take stock of its HR activities and create a comprehensive human capital strategy for the future. Here, representatives from both organizations explain how the Framework was used.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Peter Cheese and Susan Cantrell

Research has shown that the more engaged the workforce, the more innovative, productive and profitable the company. Yet few executives know specifically what they can do…

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Abstract

Research has shown that the more engaged the workforce, the more innovative, productive and profitable the company. Yet few executives know specifically what they can do to develop a more engaged workforce.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Peter Cheese

The aim of this paper is to discuss the importance of talent management to strategic success, to identify the challenges in building talent power and to explore how to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to discuss the importance of talent management to strategic success, to identify the challenges in building talent power and to explore how to overcome those challenges. It summarizes some of the thinking from the book, The Talent Powered Organization

Design/methodology/approach

The paper starts by setting the context around today's major HR issues and the importance of talent management. Talent is now the key to strategic success, but is conversely getting harder to find and easier to lose. In tackling these issues, every organization must deal with a world of change and variability. The paper drills down into how to embed and sustain talent power. It explains the importance of understanding and measuring how talent contributes to an organization's performance and goes on to examine the other capabilities and processes required to ensure that talent is not just retained, but is also actively multiplied.

Findings

The paper asserts that an organization needs to put in place key processes in order to retain and actively multiply talent. They include: maintaining visible leadership that is focused on talent; encouraging and rewarding line managers for nurturing talent; and modernizing HR and training to identify, develop and deploy talent to the best effect.

Practical implications

The theory is backed up by examples from different parts of the world that demonstrate practical solutions to tackling specific challenges to building a talent‐powered organization, including: Valero Energy; Yahoo!; Campbell's Soup; Unilever; and SKM.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the importance of talent management to strategic success, in order to identify the challenges in building talent power and to explore how to overcome those challenges.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Peter Cheese

The purpose of this paper is to show what we have learned from the recession.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show what we have learned from the recession.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper indicates areas of change which need to be made. How to better manager people, particularly with a more diverse workforce, how to manage change, how to deal with uncertainty, and using the opportunity to align and engage the managers as a result.

Findings

With the heightened levels of concern amongst top business leaders, now is the time to again raise the game of talent management.

Originality/value

Although there is still much fire fighting going on in many businesses and we are not out of the woods yet, now is the time to start to stand back more and think strategically.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Content available
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Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Susannah Clements

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Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Maranda Ridgway

Three years on from the Brexit vote, while it remains a central topic for debate in the media, there has been limited discussion about the human resource (HR…

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Abstract

Purpose

Three years on from the Brexit vote, while it remains a central topic for debate in the media, there has been limited discussion about the human resource (HR) implications. The purpose of this paper is to provide theoretical evaluation and informed discussion, distilled into four interconnected propositions, on how employee resourcing as a HR practice may be impacted following actual Brexit decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the employee resourcing literature, the paper adopts a discursive approach which examines how the UK’s decision to exit the European Union will affect HR practice. The paper draws comparison with the global recession since 2008, a similarly unprecedented development in its discussion of employee resourcing practices and draws parallels which may help to inform the future of HR practices in the UK, because of Brexit.

Findings

This paper offers a set of propositions; the flow of talent into the UK may become more restricted and reinvigorate the “war for talent” that followed the effects of the global financial crisis on the UK. To attract and retain workers in relatively lower-skilled roles, employers may be faced with a need to re-skill such roles and adopt more flexible working arrangements. Finally, to meet skilled employment requirements, removal of restrictions to recruit from within the European Economic Area may trigger increased global migration of skilled workers.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the discussions regarding the implications of Brexit for HR practice by offering propositions to shape future research agendas.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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