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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Phil Bretherton and Peter Carswell

The article gives an introduction to the wine market in China and outlines its development. It goes on to identify the key issues which need to be addressed in order to…

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2650

Abstract

The article gives an introduction to the wine market in China and outlines its development. It goes on to identify the key issues which need to be addressed in order to enter the market successfully. These revolve, tactically, around effective mangement of the 4 P's, with distribution and promotion being the most problematic. It would appear that cultural differences and both formal and informal entry barriers point towards a more strategic relational approach if successful market entry is to be achieved. The implications for would‐be market entrants are discussed, as is the need for specific further research into market structure.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Peter Carswell and Deborah Rolland

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between religion and entrepreneurship and whether religious practice impacts on how individuals view the…

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3257

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between religion and entrepreneurship and whether religious practice impacts on how individuals view the individual and societal contribution of business enterprise. As ethnic diversity is increasing within the Western world, so too is the religious mix of value systems and religious belief systems that come with such diversity/religions. Paralleling increasing diversity is the decreasing participation rates in the traditional Christian churches. The paper questions the impact of this changing religious mix on entrepreneurial participation and perception.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 2,000 randomly‐selected New Zealanders were telephone‐surveyed to measure their perceptions of individual and societal impacts of entrepreneurial participation and religious practice.

Findings

The findings indicate that increasing ethnic diversity and associated religious value systems are certainly not going to negatively reduce the business start‐up rate. If anything, the start‐up rate may be enhanced.

Originality/value

The paper shows that the value that New Zealand society places upon entrepreneurship is not diminished by the increasing religious diversity in the country.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

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357

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Craig S. Galbraith

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982

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Peter M. German

Bribery of public officers has been an offence under Canada's criminal law since its codification in 1892. That offence and a collection of other little‐used provisions…

Abstract

Bribery of public officers has been an offence under Canada's criminal law since its codification in 1892. That offence and a collection of other little‐used provisions are intended to serve as a bulwark against the corruption of Canadian public officials. Until recently, however, the bribery of a foreign public official was not accorded similar, or any, treatment in Canada's criminal law. This void existed despite passage of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) in the USA in 1977. The American legislation passed unanimously in both Houses of Congress, part of the post‐Watergate attempt to cleanse America government of unethical behaviour and illegal conduct. It also came after a large number of high‐profile companies admitted to bribing foreign officials in order to obtain large government contracts.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2018

Melina Seedoyal Doargajudhur and Peter Dell

Bring your own device (BYOD) refers to employees utilizing their personal mobile devices to perform work tasks. Drawing on the job demands-resources (JD-R) model and the…

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1218

Abstract

Purpose

Bring your own device (BYOD) refers to employees utilizing their personal mobile devices to perform work tasks. Drawing on the job demands-resources (JD-R) model and the task-technology fit (TTF) model, the purpose of this paper is to develop a model that explains how BYOD affects employee well-being (through job satisfaction), job performance self-assessment, and organizational commitment through perceived job autonomy, perceived workload and TTF.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from 400 full-time employees in different industry sectors in Mauritius were used to test a model containing 13 hypotheses using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling.

Findings

The SEM results support the hypothesized model. Findings indicate that BYOD indirectly affects job satisfaction, job performance and organizational commitment via job demands (perceived workload), job resources (perceived job autonomy) and TTF. Further, job resources influences job demands while TTF predicted job performance. Finally, job satisfaction and job performance self-assessment appear to be significant determinants of organizational commitment.

Practical implications

The findings are congruent with the JD-R and TTF models, and confirm that BYOD has an impact on job satisfaction, job performance self-assessment and organizational commitment. This could inform organizations’ policies and practices relating to BYOD, leading to improved employee well-being, performance and higher commitment.

Originality/value

The expanded model developed in this study explains how employee well-being, performance and organizational commitment are affected by BYOD, and is one of the first studies to investigate these relationships.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 September 2019

Anita Zehrer and Gabriela Leiß

The purpose of this paper is to explore leadership succession in families in business. Although there is a vast amount of research on leadership succession, no attempt has…

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1909

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore leadership succession in families in business. Although there is a vast amount of research on leadership succession, no attempt has been made to understand this phenomenon by using an intergenerational learning approach. By applying the Double ABC–X model, the authors discuss how resilience is developed through intergenerational learning during family leadership succession in business.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a single case, the authors define pre- and post-event parameters of the business family under study and use the Double ABC–X Model as an analytical framework. Individual and pair interviews, as well as a family firm workshop, were undertaken following an action research approach using multiple interventions. The qualitative data were collected by reflective journals, field notes and observation protocols. Finally, the authors analyze the data according to a circular deconstruction strategy.

Findings

The authors find specific pre-event stressor parameters related to mutual mistrust, independent decision making and non-strategic transmission of power, knowledge and responsibility from predecessor to successor. The intervention based on the intergenerational approach during the post-crisis phase focuses on problem solving and coping within the new situation of co-habitation among the two generations. The intergenerational learning approach based on pile-up of demands, adaptive resources and perception is the source of family adaptation. Additionally, the power of the narrative to reflect past events and project the future seems to the point where the family starts developing resilience.

Originality/value

The way family businesses deal with critical and stressful events during leadership succession may lead to intergenerational learning, which is a source of resilient families. The authors apply the Double ABC–X model to understand family leadership succession in business and further develop it to explain how families develop resilience.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1934

DONALD CARSWELL

AS there is a traditional connection between literature and licensed premises, I may begin (though it be to my detriment) with a tavern reminiscence. Some years ago, at a…

Abstract

AS there is a traditional connection between literature and licensed premises, I may begin (though it be to my detriment) with a tavern reminiscence. Some years ago, at a highly decorous hour in the evening I got myself into a quiet corner of an old‐fashioned Hampstead house, having it in mind to turn over the pages of an advance copy of a new book in which I took a special interest. I suppose my pre‐occupation looked unsociable. Anyhow, it was remarked by a group of local tradesmen, substantial men all, and one a borough councillor. It was the borough councillor, I think, that checked me. “Well, Mr. C,” he boomed out,—it is a point of London public‐house etiquette, the origin of which would be worth investigation, that you must never take the liberty of addressing a gentleman by his surname but only by its initial—“Well, Mr. C, that must be a very interesting book. Something by old Edgar Wallace, eh?” “No,” I said, “I only wish it were,” and yielded up the book to his outstretched hand. He examined it with the curiosity of an unspoiled savage. “Nice lookin',” he murmured, “but not much in my line o' country, I should say.” Then at the sight of the title‐page he exploded. “Gawd, Mr. C, did you write all this?” I confessed that I had, and at once found myself the object of, I can't say the admiration of the group, but of their profoundest interest. The volume was passed round, fingered and frowned over and returned to me. A few seconds of embarrassed silence followed; but presently the borough councillor thrust his hands well into his trouser pockets, fixed his eyes upon the dim distance of the four‐ale bar, thoughtfully swayed backwards and forwards and spoke. “Well, I don't think I've ever read a book—not in all my life,” he said. His friends breathed something that was too slight to be called a sigh but was unmistakably an inchoate “hear, hear.” The matter then dropped. I stole humbly away, leaving them to continue their wrangle about Chelsea and the Arsenal (or it may have been Jimmy Wilde or the Lincolnshire—I cannot, as Mr. Belloc would say, be positive which).

Details

Library Review, vol. 4 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2021

Sérgio Vogt, Yara Lucia Mazziotti Bulgacov and Sara R.S.T.A. Elias

Using the concept of knowing-in-practice (KinP), and drawing from current understandings of aesthetic and sensible knowledge within organization studies, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Using the concept of knowing-in-practice (KinP), and drawing from current understandings of aesthetic and sensible knowledge within organization studies, this study explores how the entrepreneurial learning (EL) process unfolds over time, throughout the lives of startup founders, well before entrepreneurial action takes place.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a life histories approach, 25 interviews were conducted with the founders of 18 startups. Additional 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with other startups' founders, focusing on thematic stories. Data were analyzed using abduction and narrative analysis.

Findings

Although each entrepreneur's history is unique, the authors show that entrepreneurs' lives are generally a texture of practices, resulting in aesthetic–sensible knowledge that is developed as entrepreneurs participate in various social practices. This includes KinP episodes where perceptive-sensorial faculties are fundamental for entrepreneurs to perceive the world, recognize/create opportunities and launch a business.

Research limitations/implications

The historical approach did not allow the authors to witness firsthand the practices and KinP episodes that participants verbalized. Regardless, the results show that aesthetic and sensible knowledge provide a fruitful lens for investigating EL while highlighting the indissoluble relationship between practice and learning.

Originality/value

Although the senses have been recognized as fundamental for learning in organizations, entrepreneurship scholars have yet to explore the aesthetic and sensory processes involved in EL. The primary contribution of this paper is to develop a new understanding of the situated nature of EL as a process that starts well before entrepreneurial action occurs, stemming from entrepreneurs' experiencing of certain practices and the aesthetic and sensible knowledge they build over their life trajectory.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Dave Crick

The purpose of this paper is to provide longitudinal case history data from an investigation into the practices of an enterprising individual associated with two firms in…

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2679

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide longitudinal case history data from an investigation into the practices of an enterprising individual associated with two firms in the UK tourism industry. The first business had to be closed down despite the partners employing turnaround strategies to recover from a lack of planning, since an effective work/life balance was not achieved; the second has proved to be more successful due to entrepreneurial learning in overcoming earlier errors.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involved multiple in‐depth interviews with the key business owner and his partners in the two respective businesses together with supplementary interviews with staff and viewing documentation for triangulation purposes.

Findings

The findings based on a longitudinal case history suggest that some enterprising individuals may learn from certain past mistakes but could still need others to support particular business practices for them to succeed. The results also suggest that, even if a badly performing business can be turned around, owner/managers must be aware of the potential social costs that can be incurred in implementing strategies. As such, it demonstrates the need to learn from experiences and plan for social as well as work‐related issues to maintain a work/life balance, particularly in a “lifestyle” business.

Practical implications

The implications of the findings suggest that advisors (including university teaching) involved with assisting entrepreneurs make them aware of the need for effective planning. In particular, that the widely reported hard work and long hours involved in running a business can take a toll on personal lives and the work/life balance of enterprising individuals must be managed.

Originality/value

The main aspect of originality of the paper comes from the study of social costs of running an entrepreneurial venture, but the longitudinal nature of the study provides a further aspect of originality in this field of research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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