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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Fawaz Baddar ALHussan, Chavi C.Y. Fletcher-Chen and Peter Batt

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Peter J. Batt

In the absence of the auction as the principal mechanism for setting price in the Perth fresh fruit and vegetable market, there is a great deal of distrust between growers…

Abstract

In the absence of the auction as the principal mechanism for setting price in the Perth fresh fruit and vegetable market, there is a great deal of distrust between growers and the market agents who receive and distribute their produce. While most growers generally transact with more than one market agent, satisfaction with the exchange builds trust. Trust is facilitated where the grower and the market agent share similar goals. To reinforce trust, growers prefer to transact with those market agents who are prepared to invest in their relationship with the grower. Conversely, the market agents propensity to act opportunistically, to exercise power and to withhold information from the grower will have a significant negative impact on the trust that develops between growers and market agents.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Peter J. Batt

Using an analysis of marketing margins and the key dimensions of long‐term buyer‐seller relationships, it is possible to demonstrate that the supply chain for potatoes…

Abstract

Using an analysis of marketing margins and the key dimensions of long‐term buyer‐seller relationships, it is possible to demonstrate that the supply chain for potatoes cultivated in the Red River Delta (Vietnam) is surprisingly efficient. While the prices paid to farmers are ultimately determined by supply and demand, the price farmers receive from traders and collector agents is influenced by tuber quality and the costs of transportation. Farmers are seldom dependent on their preferred trading partner and indicate that numerous alternative traders are available to purchase the potatoes they have harvested. While the traders similarly enjoy a strong positive relationship both with farmers and collector agents and their down‐stream customers, wholesalers report that they are much less satisfied in their exchange relationship with both the traders and the retailers. Wholesalers are more dependent on both their up‐stream and down‐stream trading partners and are more dissatisfied and less trusting of their exchange partners.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Peter J. Batt and Ryuta Morooka

An empirical examination of the perceived differences in offer quality between Western Australian rock lobster exporters and their respective Japanese importers reveals…

Abstract

An empirical examination of the perceived differences in offer quality between Western Australian rock lobster exporters and their respective Japanese importers reveals that consistent quality, a willingness to provide market information and a willingness to meet importers” immediate needs were the most important variables influencing an importer's decision to purchase. While both importers and exporters agreed that delivering consistent quality was the most important variable, exporters ranked competitive price much higher than importers. This suggests that Western Australian exporters may benefit from adding greater value to their product offer by providing continuous product support, timely market information and responding better to importers' immediate needs, rather than attempting to compete on price against lower cost producers.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Norshamliza Chamhuri and Peter J Batt

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of the quality cues that consumers look for in purchasing fresh meat and fresh fruit and vegetables in Malaysia…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of the quality cues that consumers look for in purchasing fresh meat and fresh fruit and vegetables in Malaysia. Through a perceived quality model, this paper identifies the implicit, intrinsic, extrinsic and credence quality cues consumers’ use in their decision to purchase fresh meat and fresh fruit and vegetables.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilised the shopping mall intercept survey method. Data were collected from traditional markets and modern retail outlets in the Klang Valley region in Malaysia. A structured questionnaire was designed to measure consumer’s perceptions and experiences of food quality when purchasing fresh meat and fresh fruit and vegetables from retail outlets. In this study, univariate data analysis (descriptive analysis, one-way analysis of variance) and exploratory factor analysis were performed to analyse the data sets.

Findings

Freshness (intrinsic cue), was the most frequently cited variable when respondents thought about the quality of both product categories. Other variables included price and cleanliness (extrinsic cues) and Halal (credence cue), which was associated with the quality of fresh meat. Quality was associated with freshness, food safety, nutrition and value. Exploratory factor analysis identified food safety (implicit cue) as the most important construct in the respondents’ evaluation of quality for both fresh meat and fresh fruit and vegetables.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of research focusing on consumer’s perceptions and experiences of food quality in the purchase of fresh meat and fresh produce in Malaysia. The findings of this research may assist the Malaysian food industry by providing new insights into the consumers’ perceptions of food quality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Peter J. Batt and Aijun Liu

This paper aims to explore the factors impacting and influencing the consumer's decision to purchase honey in a retail store.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the factors impacting and influencing the consumer's decision to purchase honey in a retail store.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from shopping mall intercepts in Perth, Western Australia, using a structured questionnaire. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify the principal constructs which most influence the consumer's decision to purchase. On the basis of the ways in which honey was consumed within the household, cluster analysis was utilised to group the respondents into meaningful segments.

Findings

In Perth, Western Australia, honey is primarily consumed as a spread or a sweetener on breakfast cereals and porridge. However, honey is also used as a marinade, in cakes and cookies and as a beverage. According to the way in which honey is consumed in the household, five clusters were identified. In purchasing honey from a retail store, exploratory factor analysis revealed three principal constructs which were most influential in the consumer's decision to purchase: brand reputation, origin and value for money. Ethnicity was found to have a significant influence on the way in which honey was consumed in the household and the importance of the three constructs extracted.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that find a significant difference between Anglo Saxon and Asian consumers of honey.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Peter Boxall, Meng-Long Huo, Keith Macky and Jonathan Winterton

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle…

Abstract

High-involvement work processes (HIWPs) are associated with high levels of employee influence over the work process, such as high levels of control over how to handle individual job tasks or a high level of involvement at team or workplace level in designing work procedures. When implementations of HIWPs are accompanied by companion investments in human capital – for example, in better information and training, higher pay and stronger employee voice – it is appropriate to talk not only of HIWPs but of “high-involvement work systems” (HIWSs). This chapter reviews the theory and practice of HIWPs and HIWSs. Across a range of academic perspectives and societies, it has regularly been argued that steps to enhance employee involvement in decision-making create better opportunities to perform, better utilization of skill and human potential, and better employee motivation, leading, in turn, to various improvements in organizational and employee outcomes.

However, there are also costs to increased employee involvement and the authors review the important economic and sociopolitical contingencies that help to explain the incidence or distribution of HIWPs and HIWSs. The authors also review the research on the outcomes of higher employee involvement for firms and workers, discuss the quality of the research methods used, and consider the tensions with which the model is associated. This chapter concludes with an outline of the research agenda, envisaging an ongoing role for both quantitative and qualitative studies. Without ignoring the difficulties involved, the authors argue, from the societal perspective, that the high-involvement pathway should be considered one of the most important vectors available to improve the quality of work and employee well-being.

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

James M. Crick

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating factors that could affect the relationship between coopetition (the interplay between cooperation and competition…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating factors that could affect the relationship between coopetition (the interplay between cooperation and competition) and company performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Under the relational view and resource-based theory, key articles surrounding coopetition were reviewed. A conceptual framework (with six research propositions) was developed to understand the nature of the relationship between coopetition and company performance.

Findings

While the coopetition – company performance relationship has been well-studied, this link could be moderated by the competitive business environment, organizational resources and capabilities, and trust between rivals. Further, most authors have explored the linear relationship between coopetition and company performance; however, in this paper, the non-linear (inverted U-shaped) link is also conceptualized, whereby firms might experience “too little” and “too much” coopetition in their business strategies.

Practical implications

Management teams should engage in an “optimal-level” of coopetition by sharing resources and capabilities with rival firms, but not to the extent where they depend on such competitors. If firms rarely collaborate with their competitors, they risk not being able to achieve their performance objectives. Likewise, if businesses engage in excessive degrees of coopetition, there could be tensions between the rival companies involved. Also, practitioners should be aware of the factors that can improve or reduce their performance when they implement coopetition activities. By taking: the competitive business environment, organizational resources and capabilities, and trust between rivals into consideration, the themes of this paper should be used to help managers to maximize company performance (considered in multiple capacities).

Originality/value

This paper is used to help scholars and practitioners to understand the factors that could help or hinder the performance outcomes of coopetition activities. By appreciating the moderating roles of the competitive business environment, organizational resources and capabilities, and trust between rivals, managers are anticipated to provide themselves with scope to alter their coopetition activities to improve their performance. This article ends with a series of managerial implications, alongside some limitations and avenues for future research.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 28 July 2014

Joy Chia

To understand the communication important to social capital development and community engagement in regional communities and its relevance to corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Abstract

Purpose

To understand the communication important to social capital development and community engagement in regional communities and its relevance to corporate social responsibility (CSR).

Methodology/approach

Qualitative approach including focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Case studies of three regional Australian and Canadian communities at different stages of community development.

Findings

Communication, both traditional and in new media forms such as social media, was important to social capital development provided that it was diverse, appropriate to community needs and extended its reach to community members to include those who were marginalised. Access and skill issues affected some community members’ engagement when they attempted to use social media, although the increasing use of social media as a connector was observed. These findings have implications for organisations’ CSR, as organisations can be responsive to their communities if they also communicate and engage with them for mutual benefit.

Research limitations/implications

A pilot, exploratory study that highlighted the varied context of community social capital and the diversity of communication that engages and includes community members; ongoing research is in progress to gain understanding of regional communities’ connections and networks, and how to strengthen them and how stakeholders are identified and supported.

Practical implications

The study indicated that it is important to explore all communication avenues and extend the reach and participation of community communication through diverse channels including social media. The research provided some good examples where organisations support and encourage community social capital development – this underpins the success of other programmes such as CSR programmes.

Social implications

To develop sound networks and relationships where organisations and their communities develop trust, deal with issues and collaboratively problem solve. Social capital develops and supports other forms of capital – without it organisations may be too focused on ‘doing good’ rather than ‘being good’.

Originality/value

This chapter provides insight into communication layering and the context of social capital development for effective communication in regional communities. Social responsiveness is possible when organisations understand their community; this chapter puts forward the notion that organisations are members of their communities so that their social capital is important to all they do, including their planning and delivery of CSR programmes.

Details

Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility: Perspectives and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-796-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Trent Johnson and Johan Bruwer

Wine is widely regarded as a ‘complicated’ product and for the majority of consumers the purchasing of wine in the retail situation evokes considerable risk. Marketers are…

Abstract

Wine is widely regarded as a ‘complicated’ product and for the majority of consumers the purchasing of wine in the retail situation evokes considerable risk. Marketers are therefore constantly and increasingly trying to demystify wine in order to reduce the perceived risk levels of consumers in the purchase situation. Most previous research in the area of perceived risk literature tended to focus on the concept of risk and its measurement rather than on risk‐reduction. This study examined the preferred risk‐reduction strategies (RRS) employed by identified wine‐related lifestyle segments in the Australian wine market and linked these strategies to the wine retail environment. Relying on favourite brands or so‐called ‘safe brand’ buying was found to rank highest as a risk reduction strategy in the commercial (under $15 per bottle) and premium‐to super‐premium ($15‐$25) price ranges while the opportunity to try before buying ranked highest in the ultra‐premium ($25) price range. The results obtained have major implications for retailers and form the foundation for a competitive advantage. It also indicates the direction for future research in this strategically important area of wine consumer behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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