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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Weng Marc Lim, Pei-Lee Teh and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

Target markets of new product brands (niche customers) differ from those of existing product brands (mainstream customers) using conventional new product brand development…

Abstract

Purpose

Target markets of new product brands (niche customers) differ from those of existing product brands (mainstream customers) using conventional new product brand development strategy. The purpose of this paper is to contend that acculturation in the form of cultural pluralism exists in the marketplace and substantiates that contention through an investigation of consumer behavior outcomes resulting from the development of new product brands that target both mainstream and niche consumers through product brand crossover, an alternative product brand development strategy that leverages on cultural pluralism.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experiment was conducted to test whether consumers differ in their behavioral intentions toward existing and new product brands developed through product brand crossover. The experiments include marketing situations of matching and mismatching product brands and marketing communications in the form of marketing messages and advertising images.

Findings

The results show that consumers – in general and in segmented groups – do not differ in behavioral intentions toward existing and new product brands as a result of product brand crossover. Matching and mismatching product brands and marketing communications in the form of marketing messages and advertising images do not produce significant effects on behavioral intentions.

Originality/value

This paper offers fresh evidence showing that acculturation in the form of cultural pluralism exists in the marketplace and introduces a new concept in the form of product brand crossover that acknowledges and leverages on cultural pluralism as an alternative approach for new product brand development.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Dotun Adebanjo, Pei-Lee Teh and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct effect of external pressure on environmental outcomes and manufacturing performance and examine the mediating effect…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the direct effect of external pressure on environmental outcomes and manufacturing performance and examine the mediating effect of sustainable management practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws upon institutional theory and resource-based view to understand how factors such as external pressure and sustainable management relate with environmental outcomes and manufacturing performance. The model specifies previously unexplored direct and mediating relationships between external pressure, sustainable management, environmental outcomes and manufacturing performance. The empirical analysis is based on data collected from the sixth edition of the International Manufacturing Strategy Survey. The research hypotheses are tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

Results show that while there is a significant direct and mediating relationship between external pressure, adoption of formal sustainability programmes and environmental outcomes, such significant relationships do not exist with manufacturing performance.

Practical implications

The study shows that external pressure can influence adoption of sustainable practices but this does not necessarily lead to an improvement in manufacturing performance. As such managers need to identify the actual benefits of sustainability and weigh them up against costs of implementing such programmes.

Originality/value

The relationship between the adoption of sustainable practices and organisational performance is a complex one. In contrast to previous studies, this study found that while external pressure and sustainable management relate positively with environmental outcomes, no such relationship exists with manufacturing performance. This raises a number of question marks over naive implementation of sustainable strategies.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Yit Sean Chong and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

Via an experimental approach, this study therefore seeks to examine the effects of outcome valence upon service perception in the higher education setting where academic…

Abstract

Purpose

Via an experimental approach, this study therefore seeks to examine the effects of outcome valence upon service perception in the higher education setting where academic services form the core service element. To further extend this inquiry, the purpose of this paper is to explore the carryover effect of these emotional states to a subsequent unrelated service encounter which is classified as a peripheral service element which is hedonic in nature.

Design/methodology/approach

By using a simulated laboratory experimental procedure involving 300 participants, the authors examined the extent to which a student’s feeling toward an online test result has a bearing upon the teaching evaluation and a subsequent service experience in a branded retail context.

Findings

The results gathered from this study highlight the variability of the carryover effect of outcome valence from a work-related service context that serves as incidental emotions to a subsequent unrelated service encounter which is hedonic in nature. From the results gathered, variations were observed in relation to the dynamics of outcome valence in affecting core service evaluation where teaching quality was assessed, and in the peripheral service context in the form of retail experience at a branded cafè. From the basis of these findings, the psychological role of retail stores operating in a valence-oriented industry such as the higher education is discussed in this study.

Practical implications

Essentially, this study contributes to the academic literature and managerial practices by extending the knowledge in the dynamics of valence and its impact upon service perceptions.

Originality/value

This study adopts a simulated experimental design to assess the transference effect of valence in specific service encounters. This methodological approach offers greater reliability compared to existing studies which undertake a retrospective approach via questionnaire survey to examine outcome valence in service experiences. The results from this study provide important managerial implications by assessing the impact of valence upon customer satisfaction ratings which are commonly used for performance appraisal of service staff members. Additionally, the outcome of this study potentially assist managers to account for incidental emotions which may have an impact upon customer’s service experience.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2018

Yit Sean Chong and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to examine the notion of “service transgression” which violates customers’ religious beliefs through observing certain dietary guidelines that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the notion of “service transgression” which violates customers’ religious beliefs through observing certain dietary guidelines that shape their religious identity. While service transgression and customer forgiveness are predominantly examined using experimental procedures or questionnaire survey in existing studies, this study adopts an interpretive paradigm to explore the complexities and idiosyncratic narratives of individual perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Detailed narrative accounts of 15 participants consisting of five Muslims, five Buddhists and five Hindus; who are working adults residing in Malaysia were gathered via in-depth interviews. Critical incident technique was employed with interpretive approach being undertaken to uncover key themes that form the essence of experiences in service transgressions.

Findings

The responses from participants were mainly contingent to the individuals’ interpretations of their religious expectations in the assessment of the incidents. Observations from the interview protocols reveal common themes in the consideration of whether one has indeed transgressed against the religious norms, the assignment of blame and responsibility and reparation of relationships. From the findings of this study, the authors developed a typology of conflict framing categories: “damaged identity”, “identity at risk” and “identity preservation” by considering both dyadic and triadic service relationships in service failure incidents which involve a violation of customers’ religious belief systems.

Practical implications

The outcome of this study seeks to inform service providers on the impact of service transgression of this nature upon consumers particularly in a multi-faith society. Additionally, this study provides insights into the implementation of service recovery strategies if and when such situation arises.

Originality/value

By undertaking a narrative enquiry, this study uncovers personal sense making in this phenomenon within the contextual frame of societal and historical norms. The outcome of this study provides insights to service providers on the impact of service transgression upon consumers particularly in a multi-faith context such as Malaysia. Additionally, this study discusses managerial implications associated with the implementation of service recovery strategies if and when such situation arises.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Wee Chan Au, Uracha Chatrakul Na Ayudhya, Yan Soon Tan and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-life (WL) experiences of live-in women migrant domestic workers (MDWs), who represent a significant proportion of migrant…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the work-life (WL) experiences of live-in women migrant domestic workers (MDWs), who represent a significant proportion of migrant workers globally. MDWs play a key role in enabling the work-life balance (WLB) of others, namely the middle-class households that employ them. Yet, their experiences have largely been invisible in mainstream WL literature. The authors draw on an intersectional approach to frame the WL experiences of this marginalized group of women at the intersection of being secondary labour segment workers, with significant legal and employment restrictions as migrant workers, who work and live in the same place as their employers.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative interviews were conducted with 13 women MDWs from Indonesia and the Philippines working in Malaysia. The women talked about the meaning of work as MDWs, how they maintain familial connections whilst working abroad, and how they negotiate their WLB as live-in workers. Thematic analysis of the interviews focused on the intersection of the women’s multiple dimensions of disadvantage, including gender, class and temporary migrant-foreigner status, in shaping their accounts of the WL interface.

Findings

Three thematic narratives highlight that any semblance of WLB in the MDWs’ lived experience has given way to the needs of their employers and to the imperative to earn an income for their families back home. The themes are: working as MDWs enables the women and their families back home to have a life; the co-existence of WL boundary segmentation and integration in relation to “real” and “temporary” families; and the notion of WLB being centred around the women’s ability to fulfil their multiple duties as MDWs and absent mothers/sisters/daughters.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a small sample of live-in women MDWs in Malaysia, intended to promote typically excluded voices and not to provide generalizable findings. Accessing potential participants was a considerable challenge, given the vulnerable positions of women MDWs and the invisible nature of their work.

Practical implications

Future research should adopt a multi-stakeholder approach to studying the WL experiences of women MDWs. In particular, links with non-governmental organizations who work directly with women MDWs should be established as a way of improving future participant access.

Social implications

The study underscores the existence of policies and regulations that tolerate and uphold social inequalities that benefit primary labour segment workers to the detriment of secondary labour segment workers, including women MDWs.

Originality/value

Extant WL literature is dominated by the experiences of “the ideal work-life balancers”, who tend to be white middle-class women, engaged in professional work. This study offers original contribution by giving voice to a taken-for-granted group of women migrant workers who make other people’s WLB possible. Moreover, the study challenges WL research by underscoring the power inequities that shape the participants’ marginal and disadvantaged lived experience of work, life, family and WLB.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Catherine L. Wang and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

This paper reviews the conceptual framework of organisational learning, and identifies five focuses of the concept and practices within the existing literature, namely…

Abstract

This paper reviews the conceptual framework of organisational learning, and identifies five focuses of the concept and practices within the existing literature, namely, focus on collectivity of individual learning; process or system; culture or metaphor; knowledge management; and continuous improvement. In line with current industrial contexts, this paper tentatively redefines the concept of organisational learning, incorporating the aspect of radical innovation and creativity. The aim of this paper is to provide a clarified and updated understanding of organisational learning.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Catherine L. Wang and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

Organizational forms have evolved over the decades. Organizational design reflects the systems view, which considers that structure consists of both hard and soft…

Abstract

Organizational forms have evolved over the decades. Organizational design reflects the systems view, which considers that structure consists of both hard and soft components, and is the superior composition of relationship between organizational elements. Structural dimensions are traditionally examined along three dimensions of formal relationship: hierarchical, functional, and the dimension of inclusion and centrality, underlining two prime types of structure: mechanistic and organic organizations. However, the knowledge economy makes new demands on organizational structuring based on processes. Informal structure better depicts actual organizational activities and reflects dynamic interaction that is critical to knowledge creation. This conceptual paper incorporates informal structure as an important dimension and further elaborates organizational structuring at a higher level: trust‐based relationship, externally‐oriented interactive relationship, and emotionally‐inclusive relationship; and their importance in the attainment of organizational success in the knowledge economy.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Catherine L. Wang and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

This paper challenges a concurrent perception that total quality is a management fad and being replaced by business excellence, and suggests that quality is and will be a…

Abstract

This paper challenges a concurrent perception that total quality is a management fad and being replaced by business excellence, and suggests that quality is and will be a coherent part of, and a fundamental way to business excellence. This paper further proposes that quality management will move to a higher platform: creative quality, which will be the only sustaining competitive advantage in the future hyper‐dynamic business world. By elaborating the characteristics and reflexes in connection to the attainment of creative quality, this paper presents a new agenda for business excellence.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Kwang Kok Lim, Pervaiz K. Ahmed and Mohamed Zairi

Manufacturing of perfect, defect free, products has long been recognised, and still remains an important strategic objective for any company aspiring to build market share…

Abstract

Manufacturing of perfect, defect free, products has long been recognised, and still remains an important strategic objective for any company aspiring to build market share in a globally competitive economic environment. In this paper we examine the key quality‐led techniques that have helped take Japan from a state of decimation to a leading world economy. From examination of Japanese corporate practices, a holistic model which directs attention to the key aspects that need to be taken into account in order to breed continuous improvement, is developed. The model proposed is generically relevant because it allows organisations to adapt it to their specific needs whilst ensuring that continuous improvement is not undermined.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Charles Shepherd and Pervaiz K. Ahmed

Modern organisations have approached the challenge of innovation by attempting to develop frameworks for new product development. Whilst many organisations have attempted…

Abstract

Modern organisations have approached the challenge of innovation by attempting to develop frameworks for new product development. Whilst many organisations have attempted some degree of customisation of these innovation frameworks, most of them retain features of a common skeleton. Indeed in generic terms innovation methodologies exhibit a high degree of similarity. In this paper, presented is an overview of a generic framework that serves to highlight the essential components to make such a system work. The paper goes on to indicate the types of benefits that can be derived from such a system, as well as the limitations and shortcomings of such approaches in practice.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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