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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Fauzia Jabeen, Maryam Al Hashmi and Vinita Mishra

This study aims to explore the antecedents that may lead to turnover intentions among police personnel in the United Arab Emirates.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the antecedents that may lead to turnover intentions among police personnel in the United Arab Emirates.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from police personnel (n = 176) through a questionnaire survey, and structural equation modeling was used to test the relationships.

Findings

The findings revealed that the work-family conflict and job autonomy significantly correlate with turnover intentions. Alternatively, perceived organizational support does not predict turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited by the study’s subjective assessment of police personnel turnover intentions through self-reported questionnaires. It provides implications for policymakers, organizational behavioral experts and those interested in formulating effective strategies to reduce turnover among police personnel.

Originality/value

This study offers a novel context as it assesses police personnel in an emerging Middle Eastern country. It provides insights to policymakers and academia concerning the factors strongly linked with police personnel turnover intentions and will help them formulate strategies for improving personnel satisfaction and advancing relationships between police and the community.

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Amie M. Schuck and Cara E. Rabe-Hemp

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between voluntary and involuntary turnover and officers’ salaries.

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2107

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between voluntary and involuntary turnover and officers’ salaries.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the 2013 Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics survey, Poisson regression was used to test hypotheses about the effect of pay and other economic incentives on turnover, while controlling for previously identified influential organizational and community factors, such as crime, community disorganization, geographic region, policing philosophy, collective bargaining, the utilization of body-worn cameras, and workforce diversity.

Findings

Higher salaries were significantly associated with lower voluntary and involuntary turnover rates. In addition, other economic incentives and participation in a defined benefits retirement plan were related to voluntary separations but not dismissals. Consistent with prior research, southern agencies and sheriff’s departments reported higher turnover rates than local police agencies and departments operating in other areas of the USA. The effects of workforce diversity were mixed, while collective bargaining was associated with lower rates of voluntary turnover, and the utilization of body-worn cameras was associated with higher rates.

Originality/value

In addition to contributing to the theoretical literature on antecedents of turnover, this research has practical implications by helping law enforcement officials estimate how changes in the compensation structure affect their ability to retain qualified personnel. Due to the complexities of modern law enforcement, maintaining a strong and stable workforce is becoming a greater challenge, and more research is needed to understand which incentives are crucial in recruiting and retaining the most effective policing personnel.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

Timothy G. Hawkins and William A. Muir

Public procurement officials are bound by extensive policies, procedures, and laws. However, procurement professionals perpetually struggle to comply with these vast…

Abstract

Public procurement officials are bound by extensive policies, procedures, and laws. However, procurement professionals perpetually struggle to comply with these vast requirements — particularly in the acquisition of services. The purpose of this research is to explore knowledge-based factors affecting compliance of service contracts. A regression model using data acquired via survey from 219 U.S. Government procurement professionals reveals that the extent of compliance is affected by buyer experience, personnel turnover, the sufficiency with which service requirements are defined, post-award buyer-supplier communication, and the sufficiency of procurement lead time. From these results, implications for practice and theory are drawn. The study concludes with a discussion of limitations and directions for future research.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Jing Quan and Hoon Cha

The paper aims to examine the factors that influence the turnover intention of information system (IS) personnel.

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2072

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the factors that influence the turnover intention of information system (IS) personnel.

Design/methodology/approach

Anchored in the theory of human capital and the theory of planned behavior, as well as an extensive review of existing turnover literature, the authors propose a novel set of variables based on the three‐level analysis framework suggested by Joseph et al. to examine IS turnover intention. At the individual level, IT certifications, IT experience, and past external and internal turnover behaviors are considered. At the firm level, industry type (IT versus non‐IT firms) and IT human resource practices regarding raise and promotion are included. Finally, at the environmental level, personal concerns about external changes characterized by IT outsourcing and offshoring are studied. The authors investigate the impact of these variables on turnover intention using a large sample of 10,085 IT professionals working in the USA.

Findings

The empirical analysis based on logistic regression indicates significant associations between the variables and turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may be directed toward developing multiple‐item measures for better validity and reliability of the study.

Practical implications

The authors derive managerial implications that may help guide firms to formulate effective human resource management and retention policies and strategies. They include the importance of organizational support for certification programs and the retention strategy based on the three phase career life cycle of IT professionals.

Originality/value

The study shows many interesting findings, some of which contrast the existing assertions. For example, the authors cannot find the inverted U‐shaped curvilinear relationship between IT experience and turnover intention shown in previous research.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1992

Yaqoub S.Y. Al‐Refaei and Kamel A.M. Omran

This study, completed in 1990 shortly before the Iraqi invasion,analyses some of the organizational and psychological determinants ofemployee turnover in Kuwait. The study…

Abstract

This study, completed in 1990 shortly before the Iraqi invasion, analyses some of the organizational and psychological determinants of employee turnover in Kuwait. The study is based on a sample size of 190 full‐time employees taken from governmental, private and shared sector organizations. A statistical analysis of the data indicates that organizational factors have a much more direct effect on the employee turnover rate than psychological factors. In addition, job characteristics, patterns of leadership and job motivation were the strongest predictors of voluntary job termination (employee turnover).

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Robert F. Hurley and Hooman Estelami

The service profit chain postulates that higher employee satisfaction levels lead to high customer satisfaction, and ultimately affect consumer loyalty and profitability…

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12303

Abstract

Purpose

The service profit chain postulates that higher employee satisfaction levels lead to high customer satisfaction, and ultimately affect consumer loyalty and profitability. One construct that has largely been ignored in most of this research has been the role of employee turnover. This paper proposes that employee turnover can also be a powerful predictor of employee sentiment and resulting customer satisfaction levels.

Design/methodology/approach

The relationship between employee satisfaction, employee turnover and customer satisfaction ratings is explored using an extensive data set from a chain of convenience stores. Employee perceptions were obtained from a survey which developed and administered to all store personnel. Turnover data were obtained from archival data. The data are analyzed using path analysis.

Findings

The test of various turnover indicators suggests that certain employee turnover indicators can perform as effectively as single‐item employee satisfaction ratings do in predicting customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

The finding that turnover predicts customer satisfaction as effectively as employee satisfaction is new and has important implications. More attention should be paid to managing customer satisfaction through managing turnover. Also, the use of turnover as an indicator of customer satisfaction should be explored in light of the fact that employee turnover is a naturally collected managerial measure, and does not require the costly administration of employee satisfaction surveys.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

ULF JOHANSON and MARIANNE NILSON

Human resource costing and accounting (HRCA) has been the subject of much model construction but there has been little research as to how these models are utilised in…

Abstract

Human resource costing and accounting (HRCA) has been the subject of much model construction but there has been little research as to how these models are utilised in practical decision‐making and implementation. This issue is addressed in three studies covering different aspects of HRCA. The first study shows that decisions are influenced in an experimental situation by HRCA information in such a way that the decisions are made in accordance with the content of the information. In the second study, the stimulating and inhibiting factors of force‐field analysis are used to examine a possible implementation of the methods of HRCA. In the third study, developments some years after a number of managers have come into contact with HRCA are examined. The conclusion is that HRCA has been useful as a basis for decisions or actions concerning human resource decision‐making

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Verena Dill and Uwe Jirjahn

The purpose of this paper is to examine the link between foreign ownership and perceived job insecurity. It takes into account that the link can depend on circumstances…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the link between foreign ownership and perceived job insecurity. It takes into account that the link can depend on circumstances and type of firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on linked employer-employee data from Germany. The data enable us to account for both employee characteristics and firm characteristics. Most importantly, they allow a detailed analysis of moderating influences.

Findings

The estimates show that there tends to be a positive link between foreign owners and perceived job insecurity. The link is specifically strong for foreign-owned firms with high personnel turnover or poor employment growth. It is also stronger if the foreign-owned firm providing managerial profit sharing. However, the link tends to be negative for foreign-owned firms with product innovations.

Originality/value

Econometric examinations on the link between foreign ownership and perceived job insecurity are scarce. The study contributes to the literature by using linked employer-employee data and provides a detailed analysis of interaction effects.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

William G. Doerner

Studies agency compliance with affirmative action mandate on black and/or female personnel. Examines turnover in sworn personnel in a municipal police department at…

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1232

Abstract

Studies agency compliance with affirmative action mandate on black and/or female personnel. Examines turnover in sworn personnel in a municipal police department at Tallahassee, Florida. Looks at characteristics of “stayers” and “quitters” in the context of race and gender. Discusses possible ramifications of differential turnover. Notes pronounced attrition rate for black females. Suggests that female turnover may be due to their having a higher educational level than male officers, since college‐educated personnel are more likely to grow disenchanted with routine beat duties.

Details

American Journal of Police, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0735-8547

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1974

Paul Johnson and John Corcoran

The Manpower Consultative Group for the Hotel and Catering Industry has for the last 18 months shown a serious concern for the critical manpower situation faced by that…

Abstract

The Manpower Consultative Group for the Hotel and Catering Industry has for the last 18 months shown a serious concern for the critical manpower situation faced by that industry. The Group's Chairman, in a recent statement entitled ‘Manpower weaknesses hamper industry's efficiency and restrict its growth’ drew attention to the achievements of the Group and to a number of important studies due to be reported this year:

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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