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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2018

Cherisse Hoyte

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of culture in artisan entrepreneurship. It is argued that culture plays a critical role in entrepreneurial behaviour as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of culture in artisan entrepreneurship. It is argued that culture plays a critical role in entrepreneurial behaviour as culture is a key determinant of what it means to be a person. The concept of culture is explored from a micro level of analysis therefore, conceptualising culture from the perspective of the individual entrepreneur’s personality. The main research question being investigated within this paper is: whether artisan entrepreneurs share common personality traits with other entrepreneur groups, using the five factor model (FFM) of personality as the basis of the conceptual model presented herein.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review on the emerging field of artisan entrepreneurship, followed by a review of the literature on personality theory and entrepreneurship. Then, drawing upon the FFM of personality, a conceptual framework is introduced which proposes a relationship between the Big Five personality traits and four dimensions of artisan entrepreneurship such as cultural heritage, community entrepreneurship, craftsmanship and innovation, developed from concepts derived from extant literature.

Findings

The theoretical contribution is in the form of propositions. Four propositions have been formulated around the entrepreneurial personality of artisan business owners for each of the four dimensions: cultural heritage, community entrepreneurship, craftsmanship and innovation.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to propose a relationship between the Big Five personality dimensions and the likelihood of starting and/or running a business among an entrepreneur group rather than explaining personality differences among entrepreneur and non-entrepreneur groups. The focus of the paper is specifically on artisan entrepreneurs and it has been proposed that the personality trait of agreeableness is important in the decision to start a cultural-based business. It has also been proposed that artisan entrepreneurs possess personal characteristics of openness to newness and openness to innovation that are integral to regional development.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2019

Edgar Centeno, Jesus Cambra-Fierro, Rosario Vazquez-Carrasco, Susan J. Hart and Keith Dinnie

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the largely unexplored conceptualisation of the brand-as-a-person metaphor in small-to-medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the largely unexplored conceptualisation of the brand-as-a-person metaphor in small-to-medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) by examining its potential relation with the SME owner-manager, the pathways to its creation and development and the intuitive nature of this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory approach was used, and data were collected through a set of 36 semi-structured interviews with 30 SME owner-managers in various sectors in Mexico.

Findings

The results indicate that SME owner-managers intuitively humanise their brands. The study revealed four pathways to develop the brand-as-a-person metaphor in the SME context: through personality traits, tastes and preferences, abilities and knowledge and values, all suggesting that SMEs’ brand-as-a-person metaphors are largely an extension of their owner-managers.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a theoretical framework that illustrates the four pathways to the creation and development of brand-as-a-person that are derived from the brand’s relationship with the SME owner-manager. The results of cross-industry semi-structured interviews are limited to a single culture context.

Practical implications

SME owner-managers should first undertake an introspective personal assessment of their intuitive and conscious decision-making, as SME owner-managers often make decisions in an intuitive way. The results suggest that they should act in a more conscious, responsible and rational way when formulating their brand strategies.

Originality/value

This is the first study to clarify the profound influence of SME owner-managers’ personal characteristics, including personality traits, tastes and preferences, abilities and knowledge and values, on the brand-as-a-person metaphor. This study also confirms the intuitive learning strategy formulation of SME owner-managers’ branding practices and SMEs’ need for a more rational approach to branding.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 27 June 2015

Allan H. Church, Christopher T. Rotolo, Alyson Margulies, Matthew J. Del Giudice, Nicole M. Ginther, Rebecca Levine, Jennifer Novakoske and Michael D. Tuller

Organization development is focused on implementing a planned process of positive humanistic change in organizations through the use of social science theory, action…

Abstract

Organization development is focused on implementing a planned process of positive humanistic change in organizations through the use of social science theory, action research, and data-based feedback methods. The role of personality in that change process, however, has historically been ignored or relegated to a limited set of interventions. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a conceptual overview of the linkages between personality and OD, discuss the current state of personality in the field including key trends in talent management, and offer a new multi-level framework for conceptualizing applications of personality for different types of OD efforts. The chapter concludes with implications for research and practice.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2018

Wencang Zhou, Xi Yang, Yuanqing Li and Yanli Zhang

By using a nontraditional configuration approach, the purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of personality on entrepreneurial intention and success. Previous…

Abstract

Purpose

By using a nontraditional configuration approach, the purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of personality on entrepreneurial intention and success. Previous research has focused on why individuals become entrepreneurs and why some are more successful than others. However, most studies have investigated only single factors or primary personality traits. The current study investigates not only the strength of the personality-entrepreneurship link, but also clarifies the nature of the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using two independent samples and an innovative regression-based pattern recognition procedure, the study investigates whether the nature of the personality-entrepreneurship relationship is driven by individuals’ absolute trait levels or by their idiosyncratic configuration of personality traits. The non-entrepreneur sample consisted of 225 business students in Eastern China, specializing in a variety of business subjects. The entrepreneur sample consisted of 120 business owners in a university entrepreneurial park in Eastern China.

Findings

Results support hypotheses that the two different types of entrepreneurship criteria are predicted by different personality profile effects. Entrepreneurial intentions are driven by individuals’ personality patterns (peaks and valleys in profiles). In contrast, entrepreneurial success is driven by personality levels (individuals’ relative standing on personality traits compared to other entrepreneurs).

Research limitations/implications

The findings enrich the understanding of entrepreneurial personality. The more significant contribution of the present study was that it differentiated between personality profile pattern and level effects and investigated whether the nature of the personality-entrepreneurship relationship is driven by individuals’ absolute trait levels (i.e. how high or low they score compared to others), or by their idiosyncratic configuration of personality traits (i.e. their strengths and weaknesses).

Practical implications

The findings of this study may help entrepreneurs to figure out how to be successful running their own businesses, if they are not graced with a personality pattern that is not favorable to entrepreneurship. In addition, these findings can help entrepreneurship educators to understand how best to train entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

The adoption of both person-centered approach and process perspective of entrepreneurship allowed this study to make major contributions to entrepreneurial personality research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2017

Nsubili Isaga

Focussing on the relationship between personality traits and small and medium enterprise (SME) performance in Tanzania’s furniture sector, the purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Focussing on the relationship between personality traits and small and medium enterprise (SME) performance in Tanzania’s furniture sector, the purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of cognitive characteristics as a mediating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 300 SMEs in furniture sectors from four different regions in Tanzania were involved in this study. Structural equation modelling approach was used to test simultaneously the direct and the indirect effects of the characteristics of the entrepreneurs on the SMEs performance.

Findings

The findings show that personality traits have a significant influence on SMEs performance through cognitive characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s data were collected from businesses in only one industry (furniture) in Tanzania. Future research may extend the approach to other business sectors.

Practical implications

Since entrepreneurial characteristics are considered an important driver of a country’s economic development and performance, it is hoped that governments and sector associations implement suitable policies and incentives to develop an entrepreneurial culture among citizens.

Originality/value

Current knowledge about entrepreneurial characteristics and their relationship with SME performance in developing countries, especially Tanzania, is very limited. The present study suggests that cognitive characteristics are necessary mediators of the link between personality traits and SME performance.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Hina Munir, Cai Jianfeng and Sidra Ramzan

The purpose of this paper is to extend the existing literature on entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) by employing the integrated model of personality traits and the theory…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the existing literature on entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) by employing the integrated model of personality traits and the theory of planned behavior (TPB). It further examines the mediating role of TPB’s dimensions between personality traits and EIs of final-year university students in two diverse economies: China and Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a survey method for data collection, administered both in electronic and paper form. The authors use structural equation modeling and the partial least square (PLS) method on a sample of 1,016 students and present PLS path modeling, mediation analysis and multigroup analysis.

Findings

Results reveal several differences regarding personality traits and TPB on EIs across the two countries. The impact of TPB was positive and significant in both countries; however, TPB demonstrated more explaining power in China’s student sample. Using three personality traits (risk-taking propensity, proactive personality and internal locus of control) as antecedents to TPB, the results reveal a stronger influence of personality traits among Chinese students. The mediation of three dimensions of TPB also revealed differences between country samples.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind to compare and contrast the differences between EIs in terms of personality and the determinants of planned behavior among university students in two diverse economies. The integrated model is original, supports both TPB and personality factors and provides a valuable perspective through its findings on two culturally diverse Asian countries. By applying the model in two different cultures, this study distinguishes the results for the two economies from those conducted in other economies.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Daniel Kauer, Tanja C. Prinzessin zu Waldeck and Utz Schäffer

The purpose of this research is to explore the effects of the diversity of experience and different personalities of top management team members on mediating processes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore the effects of the diversity of experience and different personalities of top management team members on mediating processes such as agenda‐setting, the generating of strategic alternatives, and the speed of strategic decision making. Previous research has studied the effects of top management team characteristics on strategic decision‐making and performance by analyzing team demographics such as age and tenure – with ambiguous results.

Design/methodology/approach

In a multi‐case study approach, 46 members of eight top management teams were interviewed and surveyed.

Findings

The study suggests that the ambiguity of research results can be decreased by: introducing more deep‐level measures; and further differentiating the mediating processes. The results indicate that diversity of experience affects agenda‐setting and the generating of alternatives but – unexpectedly – does not appear to affect the speed of decision making. Personality factors such as flexibility, achievement motivation, networking abilities, and action orientation seem to have a clearer impact on decision speed.

Practical implications

This study suggests ways to build successful teams by differentiating between the effects of experiences and personalities of team members. Furthermore, it indicates that teams might be able to compensate for different strengths and weaknesses within the team, and stresses the importance of transparent strategic objectives and leadership.

Originality/value

This study extends existing research by proposing ways to reduce the ambiguity of recent research results regarding the effects of management teams on strategic decision making. It is based on a broad empirical research and offers theoretical and managerial implications.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Jonathan C. Shrader and Luke Singer

– The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect personality has on pay satisfaction among small business managers in China and the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect personality has on pay satisfaction among small business managers in China and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is in attempt to further understanding and provide application of how companies can better incentive talent through compensation and benefit programs. The goal is to extend and deepen the comprehension of how to encourage talent pools to increase intrinsic performance through compensation programs.

Findings

The measures that were used in this study were the Big Five Personality Test and the Pay Satisfaction Questionnaire.

Originality/value

Similar results were found across the two countries, and having primary empirical data such as these is original.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Erum Ishaq, Usman Raja, Dave Bouckenooghe and Sajid Bashir

Using signaling theory and the literature on psychological contracts, the authors investigate how leaders' personalities shape their followers' perceptions of the type of…

Abstract

Purpose

Using signaling theory and the literature on psychological contracts, the authors investigate how leaders' personalities shape their followers' perceptions of the type of psychological contract formed. They also suggest that leaders' personalities impact their followers' perceived contract breach. Furthermore, the authors propose that power distance orientation in organizations acts as an important boundary condition that enhances or exacerbates the relationships between personality and contract type and personality and perceived breach.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through multiple sources in Pakistan from 456 employees employed in 102 bank branches. Multilevel moderated path analyses provided reasonably good support for our hypotheses.

Findings

The leaders' personalities impacted the relational contracts of their followers in the cases of extraversion and agreeableness, whereas neuroticism had a significant relationship with the followers' formation of transactional contracts. Similarly, agreeableness, neuroticism and conscientiousness had significant relationships with perceived breach. Finally, the power distance of the followers aggregated at a group level moderated the personality-contract type and personality-perceived breach relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This research advances understanding of psychological contracts in organizations. More specifically, it shows that the personality of leader would have profound impact on the type of contract their employees form and the likelihood that would perceive the breach of contract.

Originality/value

This research extends existing personality-psychological contract literature by examining the role of leaders' personalities in signaling to employees the type of contract that is formed and the perception of its breach. The role of power distance organizational culture as a signaling environment is also considered.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Clive R. Boddy

The purpose of this paper is to present evidence to examine the possible psychopathy of Robert Maxwell, a notorious figure in UK business history.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present evidence to examine the possible psychopathy of Robert Maxwell, a notorious figure in UK business history.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents research which retrospectively applied a tool to measure whether leading figures in twentieth century business history could be classified as being corporate psychopaths. As background to this idea, psychopaths and corporate psychopaths are defined. A measure of corporate psychopathy is explored as an aid to identifying corporate psychopaths in business history. This measure is then used in relation to senior corporate executives who have been nominated as potential corporate psychopaths and to Robert Maxwell in particular.

Findings

The paper concludes that at least some ethical scandals and failures such as those at The Daily Mirror have been characterized by the presence of CEOs who scored highly on a measure of corporate psychopathy. Maxwell’s fraudulent raiding of corporate pension funds crossed ethical and legal borders. Furthermore, Maxwell’s fraudulent looting of those pension funds crossed generational boundaries; stealing from older people’s pension funds and thereby leaving younger people/investors with less to inherit. Maxwell also had an international business empire and so his fraud had effects which crossed geographic borders. The paper concludes that using an historical approach to the study of potential corporate psychopaths illuminates what types of organizational outcomes corporate psychopaths may eventuate.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to use an historical approach to the study of potential corporate psychopaths.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

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