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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

Diane Seddon, Emma Miller, Louise Prendergast, Don Williamson and Joyce Elizabeth Cavaye

There is a growing policy impetus to promote carer well-being through the provision of personalised short breaks. However, understanding of what makes for a successful…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing policy impetus to promote carer well-being through the provision of personalised short breaks. However, understanding of what makes for a successful personalised short break is limited. This paper aims to identify key evidence gaps and considers how these could be addressed.

Design/methodology/approach

A scoping review mapping the evidence base relevant to respite and short breaks for carers for older people, including those living with dementia, was completed. National and international literature published from 2000 onwards was reviewed. The scoping review focused on well-being outcomes, identified by previous research, as being important to carers.

Findings

Most studies investigating the outcomes of short breaks for carers supporting older people focus on traditional day and residential respite care. Although there have been developments in more personalised break options for carers, research exploring their impact is scarce. There is limited knowledge about how these personalised breaks might support carers to realise important outcomes, including carer health and well-being; a life alongside caring; positive caregiving relationships; choices in caring; and satisfaction in caring. Three priority lines of inquiry to shape a future research agenda are identified: understanding what matters – evidencing personalised short break needs and intended outcomes; capturing what matters – outcomes from personalised short breaks; and commissioning, delivering and scaling up personalised short breaks provision to reflect what matters.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the development of an outcome-focused research agenda on personalised short breaks.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Jan Michael Nolin

The article aims to identify areas of potential research support that none of the traditional supportive actors (libraries, IT units, information units) have concerned…

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to identify areas of potential research support that none of the traditional supportive actors (libraries, IT units, information units) have concerned themselves with, arguing for new tasks and roles for the academic library, specifically the special librarian.

Design/methodology/approach

Areas of “overload” in the digital practice of contemporary researchers are identified and then connected to various personalized digital tools. The article explores the idea that attention to new aspects of researchers information needs creates a potential for developing personalized meta-services at academic libraries.

Findings

It is possible to identify a wealth of new services that can, if put into practice, substantially redefine the relationship between academic librarians and researchers. This entails a turn from service aimed at novice users to sophisticated end-users. Such ideas also carry implications for LIS education programs and the need to build on special librarians who uphold competence in distinct knowledge domains. Two forms of domain-specific meta-services are explored: as support for collaboration and support for presentation.

Practical implications

It is suggested that academic libraries systematically utilize the “full cost” model of project funding in order to exhibit concrete benefits of personalized meta-services. The article holds implications for both academic libraries and for LIS educational institutions.

Originality/value

Personalized meta-services constitute a relatively fresh topic and have previously not been explored in connection with academic libraries.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2018

James Sanderson and Nicola Hawdon

The purpose of this paper is to outline how personal health budgets and a universal, integrated model of support, can positively transform the way in which individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline how personal health budgets and a universal, integrated model of support, can positively transform the way in which individuals with a learning disability experience their health and support needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The review recognises that Integrated Personal Commissioning, as a policy approach, provides the framework to offer personalised care, and enables people to live an independent, happy, healthy and meaningful life.

Findings

Evidence suggests that a personalised and integrated approach to both health and social care not only offers better outcomes on all levels for the individual, but also benefits the system as a whole.

Originality/value

The study reveals that a personalised care leads to people to have choices and control over decisions that affect in better health and wellbeing outcomes for people.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

V.K.J. Jeevan and P. Padhi

To provide a selective bibliography in the emerging area of library content personalization for the benefit of library and information professionals.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a selective bibliography in the emerging area of library content personalization for the benefit of library and information professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of recently published works (in the period 1993–2004), which aim to provide pragmatic application of content personalization rather than theoretical works, are discussed and sorted into “classified” sections to help library professionals understand more about the various options for formulating content as per the specific needs of their clientele.

Findings

This paper provides information about each category of tool and technique of personalization, indicating what is achieved and how particular developments can help other libraries or professionals. It recognises that personalization of library resources is a viable way of helping users deal with the information explosion, conserving their time for more productive intellectual tasks. It identifies how computer and information technology has enabled document mapping to be more efficient, especially because of the ease with which a document can be indexed and represented with multiple terms, and confirms that this same functionality can be used to represent a user's interests, facilitating the easy linking of relevant sources to prospective users. Personalization of library resources is an effective way for maximizing user benefit.

Research limitations/implications

This is not an exhaustive list of developments in personalization. Rather it identifies a mix of products and solutions that are of immediate use to librarians.

Practical implications

A very useful source of pragmatic applications of personalization so far, that can guide a practicing professional interested in creating similar solutions for more productive information support in his/her library.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need for a “review of technology” for LIS practitioners and offers practical help to any professional exploring solutions similar to those outlined in this paper.

Details

Library Review, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

This article focuses on how Hft, a national charity for people with learning disabilities, is using and developing personalised technology to empower people with learning…

Abstract

This article focuses on how Hft, a national charity for people with learning disabilities, is using and developing personalised technology to empower people with learning disabilities and to increase their independence. It showcases how Hft is using personalised technology in practice and creating awareness of how it can be used to support independence, safety and security. Two individual case studies are provided to illustrate the effective use of technology by people with learning disabilities to increase their independence. The article highlights the need for investment and development in technology to support the growing number of dependent people and stresses the importance of ethical guidance to ensure that the technology is implemented correctly to enable people with learning disabilities to gain the maximum benefits.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Janet McCray and Adam Palmer

The purpose of this paper is to present the perspectives of English adult social care sector partners on the qualifications and standards required for leaders as they…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the perspectives of English adult social care sector partners on the qualifications and standards required for leaders as they prepare to meet the demands of commissioning personalised care. Continuing an action research cycle guided by Coghlan and Brannicks (2010, p. 4) organisational centred model (McCray and Palmer, 2009) it benefits from the previous experience and reflection in action of the partners and researchers. Set in a general social care context, lessons learned from the study outcomes will be of interest to both commissioners of services and service users with acquired brain injury.

Design/methodology/approach

A model of action research informed by Coghlan and Brannicks’ (2010, p. 4) organisational centred model focused on context, quality of relationships, quality of the research process and its’ outcomes was used. The role of the authors was to facilitate diagnosis of the leadership issues arising from the implementation of personalised care in the English adult social care sector and in collaboration with sector partners seek resolutions. Six focus groups comprising two commissioners, service providers, user group and care manager/social work leads were facilitated at two separate events in the south of England.

Findings

Findings presented are derived from focus group discussions with strategic and organisational leaders and service user partners from the English adult social care sectors. Analysis of focus group data identified a number of themes. The overarching themes of human resource management, gaps in industry standards and leadership are discussed here. Whilst industry sector standard qualifications and frameworks may be at the centre of strategic planning for transformation, findings here have identified that additional support will be required to create leaders who can commission successfully to create cultural change. New approaches to leadership development may be needed to facilitate this process.

Research limitations/implications

The study offers a single method qualitative research approach based on two local authorities in the south of England. It presents a localised and particular view of leadership development needs.

Practical implications

The paper shows how action research can make a contribution to knowledge and practice.

Originality/value

The paper provides interesting new insights into the skills for commissioning in a changing public and third sector environment with reference to commissioning personalised support for people with brain injury.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Joe Mulvihill

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness of the many benefits associated with older people accessing befriending services and to increase the quantity that are set…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to raise awareness of the many benefits associated with older people accessing befriending services and to increase the quantity that are set up and commissioned.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper contains a literature review: it looks into the results of two pilot projects and also features some case studies of befriending projects supporting older people.

Findings

Befriending services can be used to support older people: as a personalised form of care for those who may be isolated or lonely; to prevent the onset of dementia; to lead more active lives; and to increase the quality of their lives. Befrienders can help to spot illnesses which can prevent costly health conditions before they progress and help to reduce the burden on the National Health Service (NHS).

Research limitations/implications

The positive research results from two pilot projects are featured in the paper, which both highlight that befriending services should be available for all older people throughout the country, if they so choose.

Practical implications

The research outcomes are positive and back up the argument for the introduction of more befriending services to be available to all older people, particularly those with personal budgets. Befriending services can also lead to cost saving benefits for the NHS through the early intervention and prevention of complicated health issues and through reducing dependency on its resources too.

Social implications

Befriending services help to improve quality of life and should be more widely available to older people to access its personalised form of support and so should feature in public policy.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the role of befriending to those unsure of its meaning or role. This paper is of value to older people; local and central government; commissioners of health care; and people looking to improve the quality of life for older people.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2007

Andy Smith

The article describes the Five Dimensions of Person‐Centredness, an evaluation tool developed specifically to explore supported living and inclusion‐orientated…

Abstract

The article describes the Five Dimensions of Person‐Centredness, an evaluation tool developed specifically to explore supported living and inclusion‐orientated organisations. It explores some of the learning gained from using the evaluation process with four organisations in Scotland, and includes identification of common themes that make the difference when personalising support.

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Helen Bocking, Rebekah Russell-Bennett and Kate Letheren

The use of supportive digital technology – the provision of supportive services and self-management health tools using digital platforms – by marketers is increasing…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of supportive digital technology – the provision of supportive services and self-management health tools using digital platforms – by marketers is increasing alongside research interest in the topic. However, little is known about the motivations to use these tools and which tool features provide different forms of social support (informational, emotional, instrumental, network or esteem). The purpose of this paper is thus to explore consumer perceptions of supportive healthcare self-management and preferences for different levels of interactive features as social support in a health services context.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach involving 30 semi-structured interviews with consumers interested in two common preventative health services that use supportive digital tools (SDTs) (skin-cancer checks and sexually transmitted infection checks) was undertaken. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the verbatim transcripts.

Findings

This research identified there is a lack of motivation to initiate the search for SDTs; consumers are motivated by a desire to control and monitor health concerns and avoid overuse of the health system. The findings showed a preference for social support to go beyond informational support, with a need for interactivity that personalised support in a proactive manner.

Research limitations/implications

SDTs are positively perceived by consumers as part of health services. The motivation to use these tools is complex, and the social support needed is multifaceted and preferably interactive.

Practical implications

This research assists service marketers to better design informational and instrumental support for preventative self-managed healthcare services.

Originality/value

This paper extends knowledge about the motivation and social support required from SDTs in a preventative health service context.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Lars Mathiassen and Pouya Pourkomeylian

This paper explores the practical usage of insights on knowledge management (KM) to support innovation in a software organization. The organization has for some time…

Abstract

This paper explores the practical usage of insights on knowledge management (KM) to support innovation in a software organization. The organization has for some time engaged in software process improvement (SPI) initiatives to improve its operation. The paper applies two complementary approaches to KM, the codified and the personalized, to evaluate current KM practices and to improve its SPI practices. Based on the insights from the case we review key principles within SPI and evaluate the applied KM approaches. We conclude that it is advisable for SPI efforts to explicitly address KM issues. Each software organization has to find its own balance between personalized and codified approaches, this balance needs to be dynamically adjusted as the organization matures, and the adopted KM approach should differentiate between different types of SPI services.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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