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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Jui-Chang Cheng and Chien-Yu Chen

Prosocial service behaviors play a major role in the hospitality industry. However, few studies have examined how job resourcefulness affects prosocial service behaviors…

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1219

Abstract

Purpose

Prosocial service behaviors play a major role in the hospitality industry. However, few studies have examined how job resourcefulness affects prosocial service behaviors. This paper aims to investigate the relationship between job resourcefulness and prosocial service behaviors as well as clarify the mediating effect of work engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed to collect data from 282 frontline service employees in Taiwan’s hotel industry. Structural equation modeling was conducted to test the hypotheses of this research.

Findings

The results indicate that job resourcefulness is positively related to role-prescribed service behaviors, extra-role service behaviors and cooperation. Furthermore, work engagement mediates the relationship between job resourcefulness and prosocial service behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

The design of cross-sectional research restricts inference to the findings of cause–effect relationships. Also, the design of this study could not rule out the effect of common method variance, as all the data used in the study were acquired using the same questionnaire.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to the hospitality management research by investigating the link between job resourcefulness and prosocial service behaviors, and elaborating the partially mediating role of work engagement in this relationship.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2021

H.T. Xie

The purpose of this paper is to describe and compare the attributes of community dwelling adults with serious mental health illnesses in the USA and Singapore in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and compare the attributes of community dwelling adults with serious mental health illnesses in the USA and Singapore in terms of perception of mental health recovery and its correlates, namely, strengths self-efficacy, resourcefulness and stigma experience.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 100 participants from each country participated in the study by completing self-administered questionnaires.

Findings

The results showed high overall scores in mental health recovery, strengths self-efficacy and resourcefulness in both countries with only a statistically significant difference between both countries in mental health recovery. Participants in both countries also experienced stigma.

Research limitations/implications

The study not only enhanced the focus on mental health and its correlates but also suggested the need for efforts to de-stigmatize mental health conditions which could impact on mental health recovery.

Originality/value

This paper is original and adds on to the knowledge base on mental health recovery and its correlates through the unique opportunity to review information from both countries.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Malavika Desai, Bishakha Majumdar, Tanusree Chakraborty and Kamalika Ghosh

The study aims to establish the effect of personal resourcefulness and marital adjustment on job satisfaction and life satisfaction of working women in India.

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3743

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to establish the effect of personal resourcefulness and marital adjustment on job satisfaction and life satisfaction of working women in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 300 women are studied – 100 each in the working women, home‐based working women, and homemakers categories – using the following scales: socio economic status scale, general health questionnaire, self‐esteem inventory, life satisfaction scale, perceived stress scale, marital adjustment scale, the self‐control schedule, and job satisfaction questionnaire.

Findings

It is found that the home‐based working women are the least stressed, most well adjusted, and the most satisfied with their careers among the groups studied. Their ways of perceiving and handling stress are found to be more effective than those used by women in the other two groups.

Practical implications

The study implicates women friendly work policies – like flexible job hours and home office – as well as a cooperative home environment and assistance for housework. Stress relief programmes, yoga and an overall change of attitude towards housework, female employees and sex roles are needed.

Originality/value

The study shows that a positive attitude towards their work in the family and adoption of practical family‐friendly policies by organizations is likely to enhance productivity for the female workforce. Various need‐based interventions are suggested.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

H.C. Shiva Prasad and Damodar Suar

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate an instrument/scale to assess the performance of Indian software professionals (SPs).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate an instrument/scale to assess the performance of Indian software professionals (SPs).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 441 software and senior software engineers from eight Indian software firms. The team leaders assessed the performance of software and senior software engineers on 16 items. The software engineers self‐reported their experience, need for achievement, and need for social power. The financial performance (FP) of the software firms where the software engineers were working was procured from secondary sources.

Findings

The exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of scores on 16 items of the instrument suggest six dimensions of performance. They are work‐efficiency, personal resourcefulness, inter‐ and intra‐personal sensitivity, productivity orientation, timeliness, and business intelligence. The dimensions have reliability and high convergent validity. SPs having more years of experience, higher need for achievement, and higher need for social power are high performers. The (low) high performing SPs are from firms that have (lower) higher FP.

Practical implications

Human resource managers can evaluate the performance of SPs holistically on six dimensions for training, reward administration, job rotation, and promotion decisions.

Originality/value

This paper develops a behavioural instrument to assess the performance of Indian SPs.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Cecilia McInnis-Bowers, Denise Linda Parris and Bella L. Galperin

This paper aims to explore the relationship between entrepreneurship and resilience in an indigenous context. The overarching research questions are: What are the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between entrepreneurship and resilience in an indigenous context. The overarching research questions are: What are the mechanisms that link entrepreneurial thought and action to resilience in a marginalized context? How can entrepreneurial thought and actions lead to building economic, community and cultural resilience?

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory-naturalistic case study methodology was used to examine the entrepreneurial journey of the Boruca. Data were collected from in-depth semi-structured and unstructured interviews among 10 informants over a five-year period. Constant comparative method was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Due to the need to survive, the Boruca engaged in entrepreneurial thought and action, which, in turn, led to the development of community, cultural and economic resilience. The authors developed a conceptual model to illustrate how individual resiliency gained through entrepreneurial thought and action led to community, cultural and economic resiliency of the Boruca.

Research limitations/implications

This paper examines the entrepreneurial journey of one of the eight indigenous tribes of Costa Rica. Future research should expand their sample to include the other indigenous contexts.

Practical implications

From a practical standpoint, this paper suggests the need for entrepreneurial training among indigenous businesses as a key factor in developing resiliency. This is applicable for non-profit, for-profit and public organizations interested in preserving world ethnic cultures and empowering indigenous people.

Social implications

Gaining deeper and richer insights into the linkages of resilience and entrepreneurial success is important for supporting efforts of those seeking to forge pathways out of poverty.

Originality/value

This paper suggests a different view of the relationship between resilience and entrepreneurship when the context is outside of the resource-rich context of the developed world.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Abstract

Details

Rewriting Leadership with Narrative Intelligence: How Leaders Can Thrive in Complex, Confusing and Contradictory Times
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-776-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Roger Bennett

To investigate possible connections between the ways in which university lecturers define the term “entrepreneurship” and the pedagogical methods they apply when teaching…

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4787

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate possible connections between the ways in which university lecturers define the term “entrepreneurship” and the pedagogical methods they apply when teaching the subject.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 141 lecturers on entrepreneurship courses completed a questionnaire concerning meaning of the term “entrepreneurship”; the pedagogical techniques they employed when delivering entrepreneurship units; and their commitment to entrepreneurship as an academic discipline. The sample was analysed with respect to the respondents' subject areas (marketing, organisational behaviour, economics, etc.), amounts of business experience, types of employing institution, and socio‐demographic characteristics. An emerging model was tested using the technique of partial least squares.

Findings

Lecturers' definitions of entrepreneurship were indeed influenced by their backgrounds and by the number of years they had worked in businesses. Few of the sample had ever owned an enterprise and, in general, respondents' operational management experience was limited. There was no consensus as to how the word entrepreneurship should be interpreted or how the subject should be taught.

Research limitations/implications

Only a minority of the sampling frame (29 per cent) returned the questionnaire. The model that was tested had to be constructed ab initio due to the paucity of prior research in the field. Hence the study was wholly exploratory and could not test hypotheses explicitly derived from pre‐existing literature.

Practical implications

A consistent theory of entrepreneurship needs to be developed, to be disseminated among and accepted by lecturers who actually teach the subject, and then be incorporated into the curricula and syllabuses of entrepreneurship courses.

Originality/value

This research is the first to examine the perceptions of the nature of entrepreneurship held by lecturers on entrepreneurship programmes and to relate these perceptions to their antecedents and pedagogical consequences.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Bogdan Costea, Norman Crump and John Holm

This conceptual paper analyses cultural changes in the use of the concept of “play” in managerial ideologies and practices since the 1980s.

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792

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual paper analyses cultural changes in the use of the concept of “play” in managerial ideologies and practices since the 1980s.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses Koselleck's approach to conceptual history in order to map how play is used in new ways by contemporary organisations. Organisational cultures characterised by “playfulness” and “fun” are used as technologies of self‐governance. It explores a variety of sources which show how this metamorphosis of play into a management tool has occurred.

Findings

The appropriation of play by management indicates a significant propensity in the contemporary culture of work. A more complex cultural process is unfolding in the ways in which play and work are recombined and intertwined: work organisations are increasingly places where people work more on themselves than they do on work. Work has become a central therapeutic stage set for engineering and managing souls, well‐being and even “happiness”. In an increasing number of cases, highly managed play settings make corporations resemble frenetic Dionysiac machines in which the Narcissistic modern self seeks an utopia of perpetual fun.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a novel approach to critiques of managerialism. Equally, it offers a new conceptual avenue for the historical analysis of managerial ideas. The result is an original interpretation of the way in which management practices function in their wider cultural contexts.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Jenni Gilleard

Argues that although flexible working is becoming increasingly common, training departments are not creatively adapting their strategies. Provides a framework within which…

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499

Abstract

Argues that although flexible working is becoming increasingly common, training departments are not creatively adapting their strategies. Provides a framework within which to redefine the role of flexible trainers in more opportunistic, value‐added directions. Suggests the need to recognise non‐permanent professional trainers as a distinct group from permanent staff. Analyses attitudes of six English as a second language (ESL) peripheral practitioners, who typify one coherent group of the free agent training sector. Indicates concept of flexibility was viewed positively but lacked adequate support from employing organizations. Proposes various approaches for redefining flexibility to enhance organizational competitiveness and effectiveness, and individual performance and commitment.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Jean Morrissey, Louise Doyle and Agnes Higgins

The purpose of this paper is to examine the discourses that shape nurses’ understanding of self-harm and explore strategies for working with people who self-harm in a…

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1792

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the discourses that shape nurses’ understanding of self-harm and explore strategies for working with people who self-harm in a relational and a recovery-oriented manner.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-harm is a relatively common experience for a cohort of people who present to the mental health services and is, therefore, a phenomenon that mental health nurses will be familiar with. Traditionally, however, mental health nurses’ responses to people who self-harm have been largely framed by a risk adverse and biomedical discourse which positions self-harm as a “symptom” of a diagnosed mental illness, most often borderline personality disorder.

Findings

This has led to the development of largely unhelpful strategies to eliminate self-harm, often in the absence of real therapeutic engagement, which can have negative outcomes for the person. Attitudes towards those who self-harm amongst mental health nurses can also be problematic, particularly when those who hurt themselves are perceived to be attention seeking and beyond help. This, in turn, has a negative impact on treatment outcomes and future help-seeking intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Despite some deficiencies in how mental health nurses respond to people who self-harm, it is widely recognised that they have an important role to play in self-harm prevention reduction and harm minimisation.

Practical implications

By moving the focus of practice away from the traditional concept of “risk” towards co-constructed collaborative safety planning, mental health nurses can respond in a more embodied individualised and sensitive manner to those who self-harm.

Originality/value

This paper adds further knowledge and understanding to assist nurses’ understanding and working with people who self-harm in a relational and a recovery-oriented manner.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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