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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Yuanyuan Feng and Denise E. Agosto

Building on theoretical foundation of personal information management (PIM) in information science, this paper seeks to understand how activity tracker users manage their…

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1663

Abstract

Purpose

Building on theoretical foundation of personal information management (PIM) in information science, this paper seeks to understand how activity tracker users manage their personal health information generated by their devices and to elucidate future activity tracking technology in support of personal health information management (PHIM). This paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a web survey study with a specific group of activity tracker users – amateur runners. This survey collected both quantitative and qualitative data on participants’ engagement with activity tracking technology, their PHIM practices with the information generated by the technology and how their needs were being met by their activity tracking technology use and PHIM practices.

Findings

Amateur runners surveyed in this study exhibit long-term engagement and frequent interaction with activity tracking technology. They also engage in PHIM practices by using a range of PHIM tools and performing various PHIM activities. Furthermore, they use activity tracking technology and engage in PHIM practices to meet various health/fitness-related needs and information needs, while some of these needs such as performance needs and overarching needs are only partially met or unmet.

Originality/value

This research discusses amateur runners as power users of activity tracking technology, provides timely updates to PIM and PHIM research in light of a new type of personal health information, and generates design considerations for future activity tracking technology in support of PHIM. It also brings together previously disparate research regarding everyday life PHIM in information science, human–computer interaction and health informatics.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

S. Keith Mills, Rico S. Yao and Yolande E. Chan

Privacy and security are coming under more and more scrutiny in this age of digital information that can be generated, duplicated, and transferred with increasing…

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1034

Abstract

Privacy and security are coming under more and more scrutiny in this age of digital information that can be generated, duplicated, and transferred with increasing facility. Nowhere is this so apparent as in the field of health care, where breaches to security and privacy carry very personal and potentially harmful consequences. Health Information Networks must deal with these issues carefully as they seek to share sensitive information among health‐care providers to improve patient care. This article examines issues related to privacy in Health Information Networks in Canada, provides a summary of relevant federal and provincial legislation, and through a case study offers suggestions for future directions in the arena where health‐care and privacy issues meet.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-0756

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Janne Lahtiranta

Health care has come to a turning point. Particularly due to aging societies and economic pressure placed on health care system, health is rapidly becoming one's own…

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1292

Abstract

Purpose

Health care has come to a turning point. Particularly due to aging societies and economic pressure placed on health care system, health is rapidly becoming one's own responsibility. This fundamental paradigm shift does not only affect the way health care services that will be provided in the near future but it also places enormous health information management demands on the laypeople. The purpose of this paper is to look into this emerging phenomenon, its current challenges and available solutions.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to identify different kinds of solutions used for personal health information management (PHIM) and related challenges, a bibliographical review is conducted using five online databases. The review focuses on articles that emphasize personal nature of the health information management. The bibliographical review is also extended to some of the articles cited in the original review. To support discoveries from the bibliographical review, the results are compared to free electronic personal health records of different types.

Findings

The paper identifies some of the most current challenges in the field of PHIM and provides an outline for overcoming them. Proposed guidelines include a concept of citizen pathways (CPs) that can be used for complementing the currently available solutions from a citizen‐centric perspective.

Research limitations/implications

The paper points out near‐future development directions for the PHIM solutions in the form of identified and relevant challenges and characterized CPs. However, the forward‐looking conclusions are based on a bibliographical review and analysis of existing systems, and therefore their functionality and applicability are not tested in practice.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper can be used in shaping PHIM solutions of the near future. The described challenges can also be used to identify potential problems of the internet and new media on a larger scale in the context of health and medical informatics.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Teresa Fernandes and Marta Costa

The COVID-19 pandemic represents a unique challenge for public health worldwide. In this context, smartphone-based tracking apps play an important role in controlling…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic represents a unique challenge for public health worldwide. In this context, smartphone-based tracking apps play an important role in controlling transmission. However, privacy concerns may compromise the population’s willingness to adopt this mobile health (mHealth) technology. Based on the privacy calculus theory, this study aims to examine what factors drive or hinder adoption and disclosure, considering the moderating role of age and health status.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a European country hit by the pandemic that has recently launched a COVID-19 contact-tracing app. Data from 504 potential users was analyzed through partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results indicate that perceived benefits and privacy concerns impact adoption and disclosure and confirm the existence of a privacy paradox. However, for young and healthy users, only benefits have a significant effect. Moreover, older people value more personal than societal benefits while for respondents with a chronical disease privacy concerns outweigh personal benefits.

Originality/value

The study contributes to consumer privacy research and to the mHealth literature, where privacy issues have been rarely explored, particularly regarding COVID-19 contact-tracing apps. The study re-examines the privacy calculus by incorporating societal benefits and moving from a traditional “self-focus” approach to an “other-focus” perspective. This study further adds to prior research by examining the moderating role of age and health condition, two COVID-19 risk factors. This study thus offers critical insights for governments and health organizations aiming to use these tools to reduce COVID-19 transmission rates.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Muhammad Riaz, Xiwei Wang, Sherani and Yu Guo

Drawing upon the communicative ecology theory (CET), this study aims to identify the potential precursors of social media health information seeking intentions (ISI) and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the communicative ecology theory (CET), this study aims to identify the potential precursors of social media health information seeking intentions (ISI) and examine their effects on health information re-sharing behaviors and PHH during coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The data is collected through an online survey conducted in two different universities situated in highly COVID-19-affected cities – Wuhan and Zhengzhou, China. The valid data consists of 230 useful responses from WeChat users and to analyze the final data set structural equation modeling (SEM) is used.

Findings

The results indicate that perceived health information credibility (PIC), trust on the medium (TRM) and peer influence (PI) significantly affect health ISI which further affects health information re-sharing behaviors (IRB) and personal health-care habits (PHH). Besides, the results also identify that PI has a direct, positive and significant effect on health IRB via social media during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

This study investigates the health information intentional behavior precursors and their consequences via WeChat (taken as social media platform) during COVID-19 pandemic. Future studies may conduct research by examining online information behaviors on other social media platforms – Twitter, WhatsApp, Facebook, etc. – in health emergency situations.

Practical implications

The health information producers and providers have to deal with communicative ecology sentiments elegantly in emergency situations such as during the COVID-19 pandemic. They need to do collective efforts by introducing new tools or social apps which deal with valuable, reliable and accurate health content and information generated by the pandemic experts and health professionals. In such a way, the social apps and tools (Information providers) will act as mediators between the health professionals (Information producers) and general social media users (information seekers). Such initiatives will ultimately bring forth positive effect on individuals’ PHH as a whole within a network, community, environment or nations during a health emergency – COVID-19 pandemic.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first studies to examine the potential precursors of social media health ISIs and their resultant effects on individual’s health IRB and PHH during the COVID-19 pandemic. As currently it is noticed, an incredible upsurge of health information via social media has intense impacts on personal health-care research and practice, particularly during health emergency situations such as COVID-19 pandemic conditions.

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Jari Juga, Jouni Juntunen and Timo Koivumäki

This study aims to explicate the behavioral factors that determine willingness to share personal health data for secondary uses.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explicate the behavioral factors that determine willingness to share personal health data for secondary uses.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical model is developed and tested with structural equation modeling using survey data from Finland.

Findings

It is shown that attitude toward information sharing is the strongest factor contributing to the willingness to share personal health information (PHI). Trust and control serve as mediating factors between the attitude and willingness to share PHI.

Research limitations/implications

The measures of the model need further refinement to cover the various aspects of the behavioral concepts.

Practical implications

The model provides useful insights into the factors that affect the willingness for information sharing in health care and in other areas where personal information is distributed.

Social implications

Sharing of PHI for secondary purposes can offer social benefits through improvements in health-care performance.

Originality/value

A broad-scale empirical data gives a unique view of attitudes toward sharing of PHI in one national setting.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Pouyan Esmaeilzadeh

Health information exchange (HIE) initiatives utilize sharing mechanisms through which health information is mostly transmitted without a patient's close supervision;…

Abstract

Purpose

Health information exchange (HIE) initiatives utilize sharing mechanisms through which health information is mostly transmitted without a patient's close supervision; thus, patient trust in the HIE is the core in this setting. Existing technology acceptance theories mainly consider cognitive beliefs resulting in adoption behavior. The study argues that existing theories should be expanded to cover not only cognitive beliefs but also the emotion provoked by the sharing nature of the technology. Based on the theory of reasoned action, the technology adoption literature, and the trust literature, we theoretically explain and empirically test the impact of perceived transparency of privacy policy on cognitive trust and emotional trust in HIEs. Moreover, the study analyzes the effects of cognitive trust and emotional trust on the intention to opt in to HIEs and willingness to disclose health information.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted using data from individuals who were aware of HIEs through experience with at least one provider participating in an HIE network. Data were collected from a wide range of adult population groups in the United States.

Findings

The structural equation modeling analysis results provide empirical support for the proposed model. The model highlights the strategic role of the perceived transparency of the privacy policy in building trust in HIEs. When patients know more about HIE security measures, sharing procedures, and privacy terms, they feel more in control, more assured, and less at risk. The results also show that patient trust in HIEs may take the forms of intention to opt in to an HIE and willingness to disclose health information exchanged through HIE networks.

Originality/value

The findings of this study should be of interest to both academics and practitioners. The research highlights the importance of developing and using a transparent privacy policy in the diffusion of HIEs. The findings provide a deep understanding of dimensions of HIE privacy policy that should be addressed by health-care organizations to exchange personal health information in a secure and private manner.

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Sujin Kim, Sue Yeon Syn and Donghee Sinn

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test whether individuals’ internal factors (prior knowledge, resources, and capability) and environmental factors (stimuli…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test whether individuals’ internal factors (prior knowledge, resources, and capability) and environmental factors (stimuli, limitation) have any influence on the development of personal health information management (PHIM) literacy skills and which constructs are statistically associated with general health-related outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses were collected from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (mTurk), a crowdsourcing internet service, in December 2013. A total of 578 responses were analyzed using partial-least squares structural equation modeling technique.

Findings

The model as a whole exhibited 62.8 percent of variance in health-related outcomes. The findings suggest that prior knowledge has a direct effect on health literacy (HL) skills (H3: β=0.212, p<0.001). The PHIM stimuli (H4: β=0.475, p<0.001) have a direct impact on HL skills, and they have an indirect effect on the comprehension of stimuli (H6: β=0.526, p<0.001) through the mediator of stimuli and the knowledge variable.

Research limitations/implications

One possible limitation of this study is that the study may include a highly technology literate group, as survey respondents were recruited from the online service mTurk.

Practical implications

The study poses implications for further research and practice. This research was an exploratory work for further model development so future studies should investigate deeper into real personal health record (PHR) user groups (e.g. patients and caregivers). For example, studies by White and Horvitz (2009a, b) conducted real-time user studies that the authors could apply to the authors’ future PHR studies. Since the findings cannot be generalizable to these specific groups, similar research may be conducted. Using caregiver groups of PHR users in comparison to patient groups could determine the similarities and differences of their PHIM activities and related outcomes for optimal design of self-care management.

Social implications

Further, it is suggested to conduct large scale, real-time-based studies using a PHR transaction log analysis to achieve conclusiveness and generalizability. Additionally, future studies should address not only diverse real-time user groups, but also various PHR data sources and their presentation issues.

Originality/value

This study model offers an important perspective on PHIM and its causal pathway for use not only by patient educators and healthcare providers but also information providers, personal health record (PHR) system developers, and PHR users.

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2020

Sue Yeon Syn, Donghee Sinn and Sujin Kim

This study aims to investigate how college students' personal information behaviors were impacted by contexts, resource types and perceptions of personal information management.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how college students' personal information behaviors were impacted by contexts, resource types and perceptions of personal information management.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an online survey, a total of 1,194 valid responses were collected from college students. The three contexts used for this study include academic, health and personal digital history. Specific scenarios, along with sets of resource types, were provided for each context.

Findings

The findings show that college students' perceptions and contexts strongly influence their activities related to personal information, and that resource types impact their activities depending on the context in which the resource types are situated. The findings of this study provide evidence of how varying factors influence personal information behaviors at different levels. Information professionals need to design their services and programs in a way that is cognizant of the factors that influence users and the challenges that users meet with in different contexts and resource types.

Originality/value

The findings of this study contribute to personal information research by providing an understanding of how context, perceptions and resource types intertwiningly influence personal information behaviors. This study provides an insight into widely accepted patterns and perceptions of personal information behavior with particular information resource types and within specific contexts.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 72 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Kisha Hortman Hawthorne and Lorraine Richards

This paper examines existing research on the topic of personal health records (PHRs). Areas covered include PHR/patient portal, recordkeeping, preservation planning…

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4785

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines existing research on the topic of personal health records (PHRs). Areas covered include PHR/patient portal, recordkeeping, preservation planning, access and provider needs for future reuse of health information. Patient and physician PHR use and functionality, as well as adoption facilitators and barriers, are also reviewed.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper engages in a review of relevant literature from a variety of subject domains, including personal information management, medical informatics, medical literature and archives and records management literature.

Findings

The review finds that PHRs are extensions of electronic records. In addition, it finds a lack of literature within archives and records management that may lead to a less preservation-centric examination of the new PHR technologies that are desirable for controlling the lifecycle of these important new records-type.

Originality/value

Although the issues presented by PHRs are issues that can best be solved with the use of techniques from records management, there is no current literature related to PHRs in the records management literature, and that offered in the medical informatics literature treats the stewardship aspects of PHRs as insurmountable. This paper offers an introduction to the aspects of PHRs that could fruitfully be examined in archives and records management.

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