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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Markus C. Hasel and Steven L. Grover

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interplay between different streams of trust and leadership and their impact on motivation and performance. The model answers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interplay between different streams of trust and leadership and their impact on motivation and performance. The model answers recent calls for a better understanding of underlying mechanisms in these interactions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors drew from contemporary leadership and trust theories to develop ten propositions teasing out how specific person- and role-oriented leadership behaviors interact with calculus-, identification-, knowledge-based trust, motivation, and performance.

Findings

The model accentuates the complexity of the interactions between trust, leadership, and follower outcomes. It guides future empirical research to unravel these intricate relations and accentuates their complexity.

Research limitations/implications

The ten propositions act as guidelines in mastering the complex art of leadership by understanding how behaviors affect followers. An important limitation originates in the detailed analysis of leadership and trust. Focusing on specific leadership behaviors and trust types leaves further scope for future research into additional behaviors and cofounding variables to arrive at a more holistic picture of the underlying mechanisms that make or break an effective leader.

Originality/value

Contemporary theories on leadership and trust frequently view the different streams as overall constructs in lieu of multi-faceted phenomena. The model is a first of its kind in that it fuses contemporary leadership and trust theory to develop a set of propositions based on specific interactions between leadership behaviors and different forms of trust.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Ajay K. Jain

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of motives for volunteerism and organizational culture on organizational commitment (OC) and organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of motives for volunteerism and organizational culture on organizational commitment (OC) and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) in Indian work context.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 248 middle and senior managers of a public sector organization in India. The self and other reported questionnaires were used to collect the data.

Findings

Results of hierarchical regression analysis have shown that personal development dimension of volunteerism was found to be the positive predictor of OC and OCB both. However, career enhancement, empathy and community concern dimensions of volunteerism had mixed effects on both the criterion variables. Furthermore, culture had not shown a significant impact on OCB; however, it had a positive influence on affective and continuance commitment. Moreover, demographic variables (age, education and tenure) had strong impact on OC than OCB.

Practical implications

OC and OCB are highly desirable forms of employees’ behavior in which motivation for volunteerism and organizational culture can play a significant role. However, both OC and OCB are differentially predicted by these antecedent variables.

Originality/value

This is the first study which has explored the impact of motives for volunteerism on OC and OCB in the field of organizational behavior in a non-western work context such as India.

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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2020

Meltem Ceri-Booms

The research studies the role of contextual moderating variables on the relationship between person-oriented leadership behaviors (POLBs) and team performance. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The research studies the role of contextual moderating variables on the relationship between person-oriented leadership behaviors (POLBs) and team performance. The authors claim that the varying effect sizes between POLBs and team performance are large because of the context the team is functioning in. Therefore, based on the framework of Johns (2006), this paper aims to investigate the moderating role of the relevant demographic (leader gender), social (in-group collectivism and team size), task (skill differentiation) and methodological (common method bias and the rater of the team performance) contextual variables in the study.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors accumulated evidence from 48 independent primary studies (N team = 4,276) to run the meta-analytic analyses. The authors followed the procedures described by Schmidt and Hunter (2015). For the categorical moderators, the analyzes were aided by the Hunter–Schmidt meta-analysis programs (2.0) (Schmidt and Le, 2014), which is an interactive software using a random-effects model. In the analyzes for the continuous moderators, the authors used Lipsey and Wilson’s (2001) statistical package for the social sciences macros and run meta-regressions using a random-effects model with unrestricted maximum likelihood.

Findings

The results indicate that the relationship weakens when female leaders exhibit these behaviors and when the team size increases. On the other hand, in-group collectivism strengthens the relationship. The study also found that the common method bias and the assessment method of the team performance are significant moderators altering the relationship.

Practical implications

The study highlights the perceptual differences and biases based on leader gender. Acknowledging these biases may help practitioners to appreciate the female qualities in leadership and decrease the undervaluation of female effectiveness. To create high-performing teams, leaders in high in-group collectivist countries are expected to develop a family feeling in the team by showing their concern for personal issues and build close interpersonal relationships. Researchers should use multiple sources to assess the predictor and criterion variables and also opt for more objective assessment methods for team performance.

Originality/value

With this study, the authors follow a substantively different perspective compared to the past meta-analytic reviews on this relationship. Rather than testing the inquiry whether there is a relationship between the two variables, the authors specifically focus on the role of contextual moderating variables. Several researchers have acknowledged that contextual considerations are critical in leadership-team performance research. Nevertheless, the body of research remains to be not cohesive. Thus, the study answers a call in the leadership area for a more context-based and cohesive understanding of the effects of leadership on team performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Ajay K Jain

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship of altruistic and egoistic motives with person- and organization-oriented citizenship behaviors as mediated by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship of altruistic and egoistic motives with person- and organization-oriented citizenship behaviors as mediated by affective commitment. The author hypothesized that altruistic motives are positively associated with person-oriented citizenship behavior and affective commitment while egoistic motives are positively associated with organization-oriented citizenship behavior and negatively associated with affective commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 248 middle and senior managers from 20 different locations of a power generation organization in India. Self- and other reported method were used to collect the data by administering the questionnaires.

Findings

Results of structural equation analysis have supported, with some exception, the hypotheses. Affective commitment has mediated the relationship between motives and both forms of citizenship behavior. However, altruistic motives had shown a negative relationship with affective commitment and had a positive relationship with person-oriented citizenship behavior. Meanwhile, egoistic motives had a positive relationship with affective commitment and organization-oriented citizenship behavior.

Practical implications

Results suggest that organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) per se is not important rather motives play an important role during the performance appraisal process. Further there is a differential impact of altruistic and egoistic motives on employees’ attitude and behavior, and both can coexist in this process.

Originality/value

This is the first study on the relationship of motives, affective commitment and OCBs in India.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

Karen Korabik and Roya Ayman

Although getting along with people is just as important to being agood manager as being able to get the job done, according to the currentstereotype the ideal manager is…

Abstract

Although getting along with people is just as important to being a good manager as being able to get the job done, according to the current stereotype the ideal manager is task‐oriented rather than person‐oriented. Here the importance of feminine qualities and interpersonal skills for managerial effectiveness are discussed. Interviews with 30 women managers illustrate the fact that women can approach management with a “masculine” (task‐oriented), “feminine” (people‐oriented), or an “androgynous” style which combines the two. The androgynous style is the one most likely to be successful.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1970

KEITH F. PUNCH

The term “bureaucracy” is becoming increasingly relevant in discussion of schools, especially as they grow bigger and organizationally more complex. This study of 48…

Abstract

The term “bureaucracy” is becoming increasingly relevant in discussion of schools, especially as they grow bigger and organizationally more complex. This study of 48 elementary schools in Ontario attempted to account for interschool variation in bureaucratization, particularly as it was associated with leader behavior. Hall's scales were used to measure perceived degree of bureaucratization; the LBDQ‐XII to measure leader behavior. It was found that leader behavior is the biggest single determinant of level of bureaucratization. Contrary to the traditional view, size of school is inversely related to level of bureaucratization. Although some 25 per cent of interschool variation in bureaucratization was not accounted for by the variables studied it seems clear that “as goes the principal, so goes the school.”

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Romie F. Littrell

This monograph reports and compares “desirable” leadership traits, and leadership traits actual exhibited by managers and supervisors as defined by responses on the…

Abstract

This monograph reports and compares “desirable” leadership traits, and leadership traits actual exhibited by managers and supervisors as defined by responses on the original English and a Chinese language translation of the Ohio State University leadership behaviour description questionnaire XII (LBDQ XII). From anecdotal evidence and personal experience, the researcher found considerable difficulty in transferring research results from Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore to useful practice in the interior of China and performed this study in an attempt to gain understanding for management training courses. Data was collected for 220 managers and supervisors in two hotels in the interior of China. Both expatriate and indigenous Chinese managers were included. All supervisors were Chinese. A significant (p < 0.05) difference between Chinese and non‐Chinese expatriates was observed for factor: Tolerance of Freedom, interestingly, with the Chinese managers indicating more tolerance of freedom than the expatriate managers. Nonetheless, Chinese supervisors believed the ideal manager should be even more tolerant of freedom than their managers (p < 0.01).

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Erik R. Eddy, Steven J. Lorenzet and Angelo Mastrangelo

The aim of this paper is to replicate previous research findings, exploring the mediating effect of personal leadership on professional leadership and willing cooperation…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to replicate previous research findings, exploring the mediating effect of personal leadership on professional leadership and willing cooperation, and to extend the leadership model to include job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Employees from a government agency located in Western New York State completed a survey designed to gather their perceptions of study variables.

Findings

Professional and personal leadership are positively related to all three outcomes and personal leadership mediates the effect of professional leadership on all three outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include predictor and outcome data both collected from the same respondents and all measures collected via survey. Both of these issues raise concerns with regards to common method bias. Actual performance data were not measured. Future research should examine the impact of leadership behaviors on organization outcomes.

Practical implications

Managers should focus on developing both professional leadership (i.e. providing direction, process, and coordination to members) and personal leadership (i.e. demonstrating expertise, trust, caring, sharing and morals) behaviors to enhance employee satisfaction and commitment.

Originality/value

The paper provides confirmatory evidence for the value of the leadership model put forth in the earlier research and extends the model to include other important outcomes. An examination of leader behaviors in a government agency uncovers ways managers can enhance their leadership behaviors.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1988

Ronald R. Sims

It meant also informing the men each day just what they had done the day before and just what they were to do that day. In order to do that, as each man came in the…

Abstract

It meant also informing the men each day just what they had done the day before and just what they were to do that day. In order to do that, as each man came in the morning, he had to reach his hand up to a pigeonhole (most of them could not read or write, but they could all find their pigeonholes) and take out two slips of paper. One was a yellow slip and one was a white slip. If they found the yellow slip, those men who could read and write knew perfectly well what it meant; it was just the general information: “Yesterday you did not earn the money that a first‐class man ought to earn. We want you to earn at least 60 per cent beyond what other laborers are paid around Bethlehem. You failed to earn that much yesterday; there is something wrong” — Frederick W. Taylor.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 12 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2010

Kiseol Yang and Hyun‐Joo Lee

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumers differ by gender in terms of the values sought from mobile data services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumers differ by gender in terms of the values sought from mobile data services.

Design/methodology/approach

The technology acceptance model (TAM) and utilitarian and hedonic value were employed to examine the differences in mobile data services usage. A total of 200 respondents participated in an online survey. Of the sample, 116 participants were female and 84 participants were male. Multiple group structural equation modeling analysis was used to examine gender differences in using mobile data services.

Findings

The findings indicated that the effect of hedonic value was stronger in the female group than the male group. Utilitarian value was a significant driving value in using mobile data services in the male group and showed a stronger effect for the male group than the female group. The results supported that the effects of hedonic value and utilitarian value on using mobile data services generated different mobile data services usages across the gender groups.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that mobile data services can be gendered in terms of utilitarian value and hedonic value. The task‐oriented utilitarian value of mobile data services can be classified as preferred by males and the communicative and hedonic aspect of mobile data services can be classified as preferred by females.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to determining driving value in using mobile data services sought by each gender and the results provide insights for mobile marketers to use in successfully positioning mobile data services into targeted markets.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

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