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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Bevin Croft, Jami Petner-Arrey and Dorothy Hiersteiner

The United States’ National Center on Advancing Person-Centered Practices and Systems provides technical assistance to human service systems on person-centered thinking

Abstract

Purpose

The United States’ National Center on Advancing Person-Centered Practices and Systems provides technical assistance to human service systems on person-centered thinking, planning and practices. To apply for the Center's technical assistance, 33 state human service systems submitted applications and participated in interviews in which they detailed technical assistance needs. This technical paper examines themes that emerged from these technical assistance applications and interviews. These themes offer a view into barriers, obstacles and priorities for human service systems as they work toward more person-centered practices. Common themes point to key areas that, if enhanced, could result in a more person-centered system overall.

Design/methodology/approach

The application process generated 33 applications containing technical assistance goals and priorities, summaries of recent and ongoing initiatives to advance person-centered approaches, measurement methods and anticipated challenges. Using thematic analysis, the authors organized the information into seven themes.

Findings

Applicants identified seven themes to improve person-centered thinking, planning and practices: Staff Training and Competencies, Participant Engagement, Measurement and Quality Improvement, Cross-System Consistency in Planning and Practice, Payment and Managed Care, Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness and Other Practice-Related Goals. They also articulated contextual factors that help or hinder systems efforts and a vision for an ideal person-centered system.

Originality/value

The themes provide a unique window into human service system administrators' priorities for achieving more person-centered human service systems and the conditions that may promote or hinder systems change.

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

Svenja Tams

The purpose of this paper is to advance a person‐centered perspective of self‐efficacy formation. Examining people's ways of thinking about self‐efficacy at work broadens…

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5192

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance a person‐centered perspective of self‐efficacy formation. Examining people's ways of thinking about self‐efficacy at work broadens one's perspective beyond training and feedback as principal means for developing self‐efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative paper analyses 145 interviews with 74 participants from six settings (management consulting, brand design, MBA job search, restaurant service, telemarketing, and financial trading).

Findings

The paper finds that the coding suggested ten specific ways of thinking about self‐efficacy. These were grouped according to two modes of thinking – attending and reflecting – and two focuses – one directed at doing one's task and the other directed at one's environment. In combination, they represent four types of thinking: attending to one's doing, attending to one's environment, reflecting upon one's doing, and taking a stance towards one's environment.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that further research needs to strengthen the validity of the identified ways of thinking about self‐efficacy and examine their determinants and outcomes.

Practical implications

The paper proposes two implications for HR development practice. First, people's self‐management capacity may be improved by coaching and training that raise mindfulness of one's ways of constructing self‐efficacy. Second, the effectiveness of performance appraisal and 360° feedback may be improved by managers, HR practitioners and people themselves giving more attention to co‐constructing relevant ways of thinking about self‐efficacy.

Originality/value

Adopting a person‐centered perspective, this paper proposes to view self‐efficacy formation as a constructivist process – that is proactive, self‐organizing and coherence‐building.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Jennifer A. Kurth, Michael L. Wehmeyer, Carly A. Roberts and Elissa Lockman Turner

Assessing learners with extensive support needs has traditionally been rooted in deficit perspectives, in which student incapacities are highlighted. We start this chapter…

Abstract

Assessing learners with extensive support needs has traditionally been rooted in deficit perspectives, in which student incapacities are highlighted. We start this chapter with an overview of this historical view and identify its shortcomings. Next, we identify alternate assessment and progress monitoring as key efforts for shifting the lens from deficit-oriented assessment toward more grade-aligned, inclusive-, and strengths-based strategies. We also identify strategies for comprehensive assessment that can continue this shift in approach. Finally, we conclude with ideas for future directions in assessing learners with extensive support needs.

Details

Traditional and Innovative Assessment Techniques for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-890-1

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2018

Renee Grassi

This paper aims to provide concrete best practices to frontlines young adult and teen librarians for building positive, effective and welcoming relationships with young…

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2064

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide concrete best practices to frontlines young adult and teen librarians for building positive, effective and welcoming relationships with young adults with disabilities at the library. The scope of this paper will include customer service strategies for working with young adults with disabilities. It will also feature strategies for making existing teen programming more accessible to young adults with disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

By using the author’s professional library experience and citing other published works, this paper will present customer service strategies for librarians and library staff. It will share strategies for leading programs for and with teens with disabilities and will also address working with parents and caregivers of teens with disabilities.

Findings

This paper recommends specific strategies, so teen librarians are better equipped to provide inclusive customer service to teens with disabilities in libraries. These strategies are as follows: speak directly to the teen, consider communication and language, develop a rapport, respect their privacy, respect and encourage independence, think person-centered, invite their input, invite them to programs, be their advocate and give them permission to be teens. In addition, this paper shares various techniques for working with parents and caregivers, as developing positive relationships with parents is integral to cultivating positive relationships with teens.

Originality/value

Because of teen’s unique developmental, social and emotional needs, librarians require a specific set of competencies for positive engagement. Unless librarians have a background in accessibility or experience with someone with disabilities, they are inadequately prepared to address the needs of this population, specifically regarding customer service to teens with disabilities. This paper aims to build capacity of librarians by expanding knowledge and skills for working with teens with disabilities. As a result, librarians will be able to increase their competency and be equipped with concrete customer service tools. Librarians will be motivated to improve the accessibility of their libraries.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Jeannine Therese Moreau and Trudy Rudge

This paper examines how certain care values permeate, legitimize and authorize hospitalized-older-adults’ care, technologies and practices. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines how certain care values permeate, legitimize and authorize hospitalized-older-adults’ care, technologies and practices. The purpose of this paper is to expose how values are not benign but operate discursively establishing “orders of worth” with significant effect on the ethics of the care-setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from a discursive ethnography to see “up close” on a surgical unit how values influence nurse/older-adult-patient care occasions in the domain of older-adults and functional decline. Data are from participant observations, conversations, interviews, chart reviews and reviewed literature. Foucauldian discursive analytics rendered values recognizable and analyzable as discursive practices. Discourse is a social practice of knowledge production constituting and giving meaning to what it represents.

Findings

Analysis reveals how care values inhere discourses like measurement, efficiency, economics, risk and functional decline (loss of capacity for independent living) pervading care technologies and practices, subjugating older adults’ bodies to techniques, turning older persons into measurable objects of knowledge. These values determine social conditions of worth, objectifying, calculating, normalizing and homogenizing what it means to be old, ill and in hospital.

Originality/value

Seven older adult patients and attendant nurses were followed for their entire hospitalization. The ethnography renders visible how care values as discursive practices rationalize the social order and operations of everyday care. Analytic outcomes offer insights of how dominant care values enabled care technologies and practices to govern hospitalized-older-adults as a population to be ordered, managed and controlled, eliding possibilities of engaging humanistic patient-centered care.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2004

Ruth Silva

The current literature on the educational progress of immigrant students within the host system is encapsulated in the thesis that these students will face difficulties…

Abstract

The current literature on the educational progress of immigrant students within the host system is encapsulated in the thesis that these students will face difficulties, and that these difficulties will more often than not lead to a failure to meet the demands of the system for the majority of the immigrant students. An apposite comment by Portes (1996), queried whether the children of immigrants would be able to work their way upwards into “…the middle-class mainstream” or whether they would be blocked in this ascent based on their migrant status, and become part of an “multiethnic underclass or join an expanded multiethnic underclass.” Súarez-Orozco and Súarez-Orozco (1995, 2000) completed this perception by uncovering the implicit viewpoint within which this query was nested. He foregrounded the domination of sensationalism and myth in discussions of the “natural process” of assimilation of minorities. Finally, current discussion on the issue of these so-called at-risk students centres on how they can be made successful at school.

Details

Ethnographies of Educational and Cultural Conflicts: Strategies and Resolutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-275-7

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2011

Samantha Hall and Helen Duperouzel

The Department of Health advocates the involvement of service users in the risk assessment and management process. Studies suggest that this is not routine practice and is…

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545

Abstract

Purpose

The Department of Health advocates the involvement of service users in the risk assessment and management process. Studies suggest that this is not routine practice and is dependent on individual professionals. The “Keeping me Safe and Well” screen was developed by Mersey Care NHS as part of a human rights healthcare project and this paper aims to analyse it.

Design/methodology/approach

The screen was piloted to adopt a more participative holistic approach to risk whilst working in partnership with service users. This took place in a 16‐bed, medium secure unit for people with a diagnosis of intellectual disabilities and personality disorder; five service users took part in the pilot. Personal records were audited to assess the level of involvement in the risk assessment process and individual and focus group interviews provided narrative on the use and usefulness of the tool.

Findings

All participating service users experienced an increased awareness and knowledge of the risk assessment process and human rights issues. The screen helped them focus on their own risk issues and the rights of others. Their views of personal risk matched those of the professionals, effectively validating existing assessment methods, promoting trust between service users and professionals, giving service users an opportunity to work collaboratively with professionals on individual risk management.

Originality/value

The screen added value to the risk assessment process by engaging service users in the risk process and supporting the adoption of a more participative, holistic approach to risk by maximising autonomy and empowerment and working in partnership with the service user.

Details

Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0927

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Constantine Iliopoulos and Vladislav Valentinov

The purpose of this paper is to shed new light on the issue of preference heterogeneity in cooperatives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed new light on the issue of preference heterogeneity in cooperatives.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the ideas of Habermas and Luhmann, this paper interprets preference heterogeneity of cooperative members in terms of the precarious relationship between the categories of “system” and “lifeworld.” The argument is buttressed with a case study of an agricultural cooperative recently founded in Central Greece.

Findings

The sensitivity of cooperatives to the lifeworld contexts of their members exacts the price in the form of the member preference heterogeneity problem. If this sensitivity is taken to be the constitutive characteristic of cooperatives, then the proposed argument hammers home their fundamental ambivalence, as they are necessarily fraught with the potential for internal conflict.

Research limitations/implications

The paper urges for a radical rethinking of Georg Draheim’s thesis of the “double nature” of cooperatives. “Double nature” is shown to aggravate the member preference heterogeneity problem.

Practical implications

The results of this study inform the cooperative leaders’ quest to strike a balance between the interests of their members and the demands of the external socio-economic environment.

Originality/value

This research contributes significantly to the literature on collective decision-making costs incurred by cooperatives. The failure of cooperatives to balance the sensitivity to members’ interests and to the external environment is exposed as the root cause of the divergence and heterogeneity of member preferences. This heterogeneity is shown to boost collective decision-making costs.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2019

Jingjing Li, Jian Zhang, Bo Shao and Chunxiao Chen

Previous research draws on the dualistic model of passion (harmonious and obsessive passion) overlooks how the different two types of passion interact within individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research draws on the dualistic model of passion (harmonious and obsessive passion) overlooks how the different two types of passion interact within individuals using a variable-centered approach. The purpose of this paper is to identify work passion profiles and their antecedent and consequences adopting a person-centered approach, and to explain inconsistences in previous studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts three studies (n=2,749 in total) using a latent profile analysis. Study 1 identifies three work passion profiles, namely, dual passion, pro harmonious passion and pro obsessive passion; study 2 examines dialectical thinking as an antecedent to work passion profile membership; study 3 examines how each profile relates to work performance and well-being.

Findings

This paper finds that the participants with a dual passion profile showed higher task performance and subjective well-being than the participants with the other two profiles; the participants with a pro obsessive passion profile were higher in task performance, interpersonal performance and psychological well-being than the participants with a pro harmonious profile.

Originality/value

This paper is the first that uses a latent profile analysis approach to examining work passion configurations. It provides a unique perspective to investigate how different types of passion configure and interact within individuals; it explores an antecedent (i.e. dialectical thinking) and outcomes (i.e. performance and well-being) of the three work passion profiles.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2019

The researchers wanted to find out a number of things. First, they wanted to assess the influence of strong unions on approaches to HRM. Second, they wanted to know if the…

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330

Abstract

Purpose

The researchers wanted to find out a number of things. First, they wanted to assess the influence of strong unions on approaches to HRM. Second, they wanted to know if the strategic HR function had a positive effect on both person-centered and performance-centered HRM. Third, they tested the theory that the economic context had a significant influence on HRM practices. Companies in liberal market economies (LMEs), for example, were expected to adopt more performance-centered HRM, but for companies in coordinated market economies the reverse was likely to be true (CMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Cristiani et al collected their data from the Cranet 2009 survey, the world’s largest comparative analysis of HRM practices. They sent out a questionnaire to senior managers responsible for HRM at private multinational companies. The authors sampled 3,406 firms across 14 countries. They placed six OECD nations in the LME group (Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, the UK, and the USA) and ten in the CME group (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Japan, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and the Netherlands).

Findings

The data revealed that the strategic HR function had a positive effect on the adoption of both person-centered and performance-centered HRM. The study also demonstrated that a more powerful union presence encouraged the use of person-centered approaches, whereas it discouraged performance-centered ones. The data suggested that the variety of capitalism (VoC) moderated the relationships between the strategic HR function role and performance-centered HMR, but the same impact on person-centered approaches was not found.

Originality/value

Proof of the moderating effect of the VoC shows that HR professionals – especially at multinationals - need to align their practices with the larger context in which their company is operating. The most valuable finding for businesses was the impact of a strong union presence on which HRM practices were likely to be accepted, or rejected.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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