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1 – 10 of 905
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Bevin Croft, Jami Petner-Arrey and Dorothy Hiersteiner

The United States’ National Center on Advancing Person-Centered Practices and Systems provides technical assistance to human service systems on person-centered thinking…

Abstract

Purpose

The United States’ National Center on Advancing Person-Centered Practices and Systems provides technical assistance to human service systems on person-centered thinking, planning and practices. To apply for the Center's technical assistance, 33 state human service systems submitted applications and participated in interviews in which they detailed technical assistance needs. This technical paper examines themes that emerged from these technical assistance applications and interviews. These themes offer a view into barriers, obstacles and priorities for human service systems as they work toward more person-centered practices. Common themes point to key areas that, if enhanced, could result in a more person-centered system overall.

Design/methodology/approach

The application process generated 33 applications containing technical assistance goals and priorities, summaries of recent and ongoing initiatives to advance person-centered approaches, measurement methods and anticipated challenges. Using thematic analysis, the authors organized the information into seven themes.

Findings

Applicants identified seven themes to improve person-centered thinking, planning and practices: Staff Training and Competencies, Participant Engagement, Measurement and Quality Improvement, Cross-System Consistency in Planning and Practice, Payment and Managed Care, Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness and Other Practice-Related Goals. They also articulated contextual factors that help or hinder systems efforts and a vision for an ideal person-centered system.

Originality/value

The themes provide a unique window into human service system administrators' priorities for achieving more person-centered human service systems and the conditions that may promote or hinder systems change.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2022

Ali Kazemi and Tinna Elfstrand Corlin

Drawing on the organizational psychology literature and social resource theory, this research aimed to investigate how attitude toward the employer (i.e. loyalty) and…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the organizational psychology literature and social resource theory, this research aimed to investigate how attitude toward the employer (i.e. loyalty) and attitude toward the client (i.e. approach to work: professional, market-oriented and person-centered) relate to the perceived importance of socio-emotional resources in providing care to older people.

Design/methodology/approach

Swedish frontline care staff members participated in an electronic survey using a cross-sectional design. Mediation analyses were conducted to examine proposed direct and indirect effects of loyalty on the perceived importance of socio-emotional resources in care through three different approaches to work in care settings.

Findings

In general, the results confirmed the hypotheses. Thus, the analyses showed a positive association between employee loyalty and the perceived value of socio-emotional resources in care, which was partially mediated by the person-centered and professional approaches to work. Moreover, the analyses showed that the person-centered approach was more strongly related to the perceived value of socio-emotional resources in care than the other two approaches, lending support to the superiority of the person-centered approach in this context.

Originality/value

The study highlights that there exist multiple approaches to work in care settings. Also, the insights about how loyalty toward the employer relates to approach to work in care settings and the perceived value of socio-emotional resources in care are novel and of crucial importance to practitioners and the outcomes of care.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 44 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2022

Martin R. Edwards and Michael Clinton

This study aims to examine configurations of person-centered psychological change during organizational restructuring and downsizing in a public sector setting. Drawing on…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine configurations of person-centered psychological change during organizational restructuring and downsizing in a public sector setting. Drawing on a social cognitive framework of organizational change the authors explore and identify the existence of different groups of employees who demonstrate varied responses (on commitment, engagement and anxiety) to restructuring and downsizing.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys were collected from employees in three longitudinal waves (Time 1 N = 253; Time 2 N = 107; Time 3 N = 93, twelve months apart) at a UK public sector organization shortly before, during and after restructuring and downsizing.

Findings

Three classes of response emerged based on levels of and change in anxiety, organizational commitment and work engagement: a positive “Flourishers” profile was identified along with two relatively negative response profiles, labeled as “Recoverers” and “Ambivalents”. Higher levels of job control accounted for membership of the more positive response profile; higher structural uncertainty predicted membership of the most negative response group.

Practical implications

Using a person-centered approach, the authors form an understanding of different types of employee responses to downsizing; along with potential factors that help explain why groups of employees may exhibit certain psychological response patterns and may need to be managed differently during change. Thus, this approach provides greater understanding to researchers and managers of the varied impact that restructuring/downsizing has on the workforce.

Originality/value

To date there has been little research exploring employee responses to organizational restructuring and downsizing that has attempted to take a person-centered approach, which assumes population heterogeneity. Unlike variable centered approaches, this unique approach helps identify different patterns of employee responses to restructuring and downsizing.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Sjanne Marie Elyse van den Groenendaal, Silvia Rossetti, Mattis van den Bergh, T.A.M. (Dorien) Kooij and Rob. F. Poell

As the current “one size fits all” research approach is likely to be ineffective in identifying the conditions that promote the entrepreneurial career of the solo…

1430

Abstract

Purpose

As the current “one size fits all” research approach is likely to be ineffective in identifying the conditions that promote the entrepreneurial career of the solo self-employed, this paper advances the current understanding of the heterogeneity among the solo self-employed.

Design/methodology/approach

A person-centered approach is used to identify groups among the solo self-employed based on their starting motives and to examine their engagement in proactive career behaviors.

Findings

Using Latent Class Analysis (LCA), six groups displaying distinct motivational profiles are identified: (1) the pushed by necessity, (2) entrepreneurs by heart, (3) control-seekers, (4) occupationally-driven, (5) challenge-seekers and (6) the family business-driven. In line with the argument that starting motives affect behavior because they reflect the future work selves that individuals aim for, results show that solo self-employed with distinct motivational profiles differ in their engagement in proactive career behaviors. For future research, it is recommended to examine the role of demographic characteristics in the engagement in proactive career behaviors.

Originality/value

Although starting motives among self-employed people have been studied frequently, this research applies an innovative methodological approach by using LCA. Hereby, a potentially more advanced configuration of starting motives is explored. Additionally, this study applies a career perspective towards the domain of solo self-employment by exploring how solo self-employed with distinct motivational profiles differ in terms of managing their entrepreneurial careers.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 November 2019

Jingjing Li, Jian Zhang, Bo Shao and Chunxiao Chen

Previous research draws on the dualistic model of passion (harmonious and obsessive passion) overlooks how the different two types of passion interact within individuals…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research draws on the dualistic model of passion (harmonious and obsessive passion) overlooks how the different two types of passion interact within individuals using a variable-centered approach. The purpose of this paper is to identify work passion profiles and their antecedent and consequences adopting a person-centered approach, and to explain inconsistences in previous studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts three studies (n=2,749 in total) using a latent profile analysis. Study 1 identifies three work passion profiles, namely, dual passion, pro harmonious passion and pro obsessive passion; study 2 examines dialectical thinking as an antecedent to work passion profile membership; study 3 examines how each profile relates to work performance and well-being.

Findings

This paper finds that the participants with a dual passion profile showed higher task performance and subjective well-being than the participants with the other two profiles; the participants with a pro obsessive passion profile were higher in task performance, interpersonal performance and psychological well-being than the participants with a pro harmonious profile.

Originality/value

This paper is the first that uses a latent profile analysis approach to examining work passion configurations. It provides a unique perspective to investigate how different types of passion configure and interact within individuals; it explores an antecedent (i.e. dialectical thinking) and outcomes (i.e. performance and well-being) of the three work passion profiles.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Carol M. Hipfner, Lacey Bennett, Denise Gettle, Catherine New and Susan Howell

A foundational tenet of psychiatric nursing is person-centered care. Research suggests person-centered care requires a therapeutic relationship based on partnerships; this…

Abstract

Purpose

A foundational tenet of psychiatric nursing is person-centered care. Research suggests person-centered care requires a therapeutic relationship based on partnerships; this partnership is integral to service users’ recovery. The purpose of this paper is to describe the integration of the concept map within a tidal/recovery framework. The integration may assist psychiatric nursing students to effectively apply recovery principles to their individual nursing practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper outlines the Tidal Model (TM) of Recovery and Reclamation philosophy, concept maps, and how these elements integrate into the psychiatric nursing practice education. Second-year psychiatric nursing students were asked to use the TM with concept mapping while working with service users in practice education settings.

Findings

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual model that the authors, psychiatric nursing educators, designed to help psychiatric students integrate the recovery principles with the service user’s care plan. Future directions include devising a research study to examine the effectiveness of the TM concept map. The authors did not conduct a research study.

Originality/value

Applying recovery principles improved person-centered care and enhanced the collaboration between service users and nursing students, and prepared students to practice from a collaborative perspective.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2018

Wencang Zhou, Xi Yang, Yuanqing Li and Yanli Zhang

By using a nontraditional configuration approach, the purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of personality on entrepreneurial intention and success. Previous…

1187

Abstract

Purpose

By using a nontraditional configuration approach, the purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of personality on entrepreneurial intention and success. Previous research has focused on why individuals become entrepreneurs and why some are more successful than others. However, most studies have investigated only single factors or primary personality traits. The current study investigates not only the strength of the personality-entrepreneurship link, but also clarifies the nature of the relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using two independent samples and an innovative regression-based pattern recognition procedure, the study investigates whether the nature of the personality-entrepreneurship relationship is driven by individuals’ absolute trait levels or by their idiosyncratic configuration of personality traits. The non-entrepreneur sample consisted of 225 business students in Eastern China, specializing in a variety of business subjects. The entrepreneur sample consisted of 120 business owners in a university entrepreneurial park in Eastern China.

Findings

Results support hypotheses that the two different types of entrepreneurship criteria are predicted by different personality profile effects. Entrepreneurial intentions are driven by individuals’ personality patterns (peaks and valleys in profiles). In contrast, entrepreneurial success is driven by personality levels (individuals’ relative standing on personality traits compared to other entrepreneurs).

Research limitations/implications

The findings enrich the understanding of entrepreneurial personality. The more significant contribution of the present study was that it differentiated between personality profile pattern and level effects and investigated whether the nature of the personality-entrepreneurship relationship is driven by individuals’ absolute trait levels (i.e. how high or low they score compared to others), or by their idiosyncratic configuration of personality traits (i.e. their strengths and weaknesses).

Practical implications

The findings of this study may help entrepreneurs to figure out how to be successful running their own businesses, if they are not graced with a personality pattern that is not favorable to entrepreneurship. In addition, these findings can help entrepreneurship educators to understand how best to train entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

The adoption of both person-centered approach and process perspective of entrepreneurship allowed this study to make major contributions to entrepreneurial personality research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2021

Jennifer A. Kurth, Michael L. Wehmeyer, Carly A. Roberts and Elissa Lockman Turner

Assessing learners with extensive support needs has traditionally been rooted in deficit perspectives, in which student incapacities are highlighted. We start this chapter…

Abstract

Assessing learners with extensive support needs has traditionally been rooted in deficit perspectives, in which student incapacities are highlighted. We start this chapter with an overview of this historical view and identify its shortcomings. Next, we identify alternate assessment and progress monitoring as key efforts for shifting the lens from deficit-oriented assessment toward more grade-aligned, inclusive-, and strengths-based strategies. We also identify strategies for comprehensive assessment that can continue this shift in approach. Finally, we conclude with ideas for future directions in assessing learners with extensive support needs.

Details

Traditional and Innovative Assessment Techniques for Students with Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-890-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 August 2019

The researchers wanted to find out a number of things. First, they wanted to assess the influence of strong unions on approaches to HRM. Second, they wanted to know if the…

417

Abstract

Purpose

The researchers wanted to find out a number of things. First, they wanted to assess the influence of strong unions on approaches to HRM. Second, they wanted to know if the strategic HR function had a positive effect on both person-centered and performance-centered HRM. Third, they tested the theory that the economic context had a significant influence on HRM practices. Companies in liberal market economies (LMEs), for example, were expected to adopt more performance-centered HRM, but for companies in coordinated market economies the reverse was likely to be true (CMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

Cristiani et al collected their data from the Cranet 2009 survey, the world’s largest comparative analysis of HRM practices. They sent out a questionnaire to senior managers responsible for HRM at private multinational companies. The authors sampled 3,406 firms across 14 countries. They placed six OECD nations in the LME group (Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, the UK, and the USA) and ten in the CME group (Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Japan, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and the Netherlands).

Findings

The data revealed that the strategic HR function had a positive effect on the adoption of both person-centered and performance-centered HRM. The study also demonstrated that a more powerful union presence encouraged the use of person-centered approaches, whereas it discouraged performance-centered ones. The data suggested that the variety of capitalism (VoC) moderated the relationships between the strategic HR function role and performance-centered HMR, but the same impact on person-centered approaches was not found.

Originality/value

Proof of the moderating effect of the VoC shows that HR professionals – especially at multinationals - need to align their practices with the larger context in which their company is operating. The most valuable finding for businesses was the impact of a strong union presence on which HRM practices were likely to be accepted, or rejected.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Chunxiao Chen, Jian Zhang, Huirong Tian and Xing Bu

Entrepreneurial passion has important implications for entrepreneurial success and psychological well-being. But their connections are complicated by the fact that three…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurial passion has important implications for entrepreneurial success and psychological well-being. But their connections are complicated by the fact that three entrepreneurial passions (passion for inventing, passion for founding and passion for developing) can be combined differently according to their level and shape difference. A variable-centered approach cannot explain their relationship very well, by only focusing on the level difference and ignoring the different combination of entrepreneurial passion in subpopulations. The purpose of this study is to explore the function of entrepreneurial passion on entrepreneurial success and psychological well-being from a person-cantered approach.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors conducted latent profile analyses to identify different configurations of different entrepreneurial passions (passion for inventing, passion for founding, passion for developing) on two samples of Chinese students and entrepreneurs. Then in the sample of Chinese entrepreneurs, the authors utilized the DCON command in Mplus to provide comparisons among the profiles on entrepreneurial success and psychological well-being.

Findings

Based on identity theory, the authors found four entrepreneurial passion profiles across two samples—fully passionate, action-driven, interest-driven and dispassionate. Furthermore, the authors found that fully passionate entrepreneurs showed the highest level of entrepreneurial success, followed by action-driven, and then by interest-driven and dispassionate showed the lowest level. Action-driven entrepreneurs experienced the highest level of psychological well-being, followed by fully passionate entrepreneurs, then by interest-driven and dispassionate.

Originality/value

The results provide new insights into the nature and influence of entrepreneurial passion on entrepreneurial success and psychological well-being from a person-centered perspective.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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