Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Isabelle T. Szmigin, Deirdre Mary O'Loughlin, Morven McEachern, Kalipso Karantinou, Belem Barbosa, Grigorios Lamprinakos and María Eugenia Fernández-Moya

In the context of European consumers’ experiences of austerity, this study aims to advance current resilience theory in marketing through developing persistent resilience

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of European consumers’ experiences of austerity, this study aims to advance current resilience theory in marketing through developing persistent resilience from a context of austerity influenced consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an interpretivist approach, 38 face to face, in-depth interviews were conducted with European consumers from Ireland, UK, Spain, Portugal, Italy and Greece who were affected in some way by the global financial crisis.

Findings

Building upon limited conceptual and empirical investigations in social geography, the analysis identifies the themes of persistent stressors and temporal orientation as constants, alongside day-to-day coping, relating and pragmatism, consumer adjustment, repertoires of resistance and transformation as key elements of persistent resilience within the consumption context of austerity.

Research limitations/implications

The study addresses the limited theoretical and empirical focus on persistent resilience and austerity and directly contributes to consumer behaviour and marketing theory in understanding persistent resilience and its implications.

Practical implications

Changes to behaviours as a result of persistent resilience included reducing and stopping consumption, discount shopping, alternative consumption in the form of growing or making and mindful consumption through wastage reduction and re-use.

Social implications

The study highlights the significant social impact of austerity while also identifying positive outcomes for social relations among family, friends and the wider community.

Originality/value

This study develops and extends Golubchikov’s (2011) theory of persistent resilience through exploring European consumer responses to austerity, identifying key consumption characteristics relevant for marketing theory and practice.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Ali Mostafavi and Alex Inman

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the pathway toward operationalizing resilience in management of transportation infrastructure.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the pathway toward operationalizing resilience in management of transportation infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

The research approach includes a comprehensive survey of the State Transportation Agencies (STA) in the USA. The information collected from the survey is analyzed using statistical analysis to explore the determinants of operationalizing resilience in transportation infrastructure management.

Findings

The results reveal that the current practices of STA need improvement in terms of pre-disaster vulnerability and exposure analysis as well as pre-disaster retrofit and betterment efforts. A pathway toward this end is identified with the major components being: funding availability, integration of efforts across different units, use of risk and vulnerability assessment approaches, and use of resilience indices.

Practical/implications

The pathway, along with the other findings, enhances the understanding of the status quo, drivers, and barriers toward operationalizing resilience in transportation infrastructure management. Such an understanding is critical for infrastructure agencies to better adapt and enhance the resilience of their assets in response to various stressors such as the impacts of climate change as well as natural disasters.

Originality/value

The study presented in this paper is the first of its kind to identify the pathway toward operationalizing resilience in transportation infrastructure management.

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

Dilek Yılmaz Börekçi, Sinem Büyüksaatçı Kiriş and Sinem Batmaca

Workarounds are defined as user-formulated solutions that overcome the obstacles preventing the system's execution from the users' lenses. In this paper, the authors aim…

Abstract

Purpose

Workarounds are defined as user-formulated solutions that overcome the obstacles preventing the system's execution from the users' lenses. In this paper, the authors aim to analyze the workarounds in system implementations and post-implementations with reflections on different levels of resilience in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors conduct a critical review of enterprise resource planning (ERP) system workarounds by evaluating whether the workarounds are treated as resilience enhancers or as hinderers at multiple levels. While doing this evaluation, the authors try to understand the nature of the workarounds (self-serving, social-serving) with respective levels of analysis for resilience (ERP resilience, organizational resilience, team resilience, employee resilience) and to integrate the assessment of similar concepts to resilience such as adaptability, flexibility and agility (in survival and sustainability dimensions).

Findings

Workaround solutions can be treated as resilience enhancers when the alternative solutions overcome some systemic problems and prevent system failures in the short run, but in the long term, they should motivate positive change and organizational dynamics. Otherwise, weaknesses of informal workarounds may become embedded in practice, and prevent confronting and correcting the shortcomings of the system and thus harm resilience.

Originality/value

The differentiation of workarounds as self-serving or social-serving and the resilience perspective toward workarounds with different levels of analysis and integrating resilience relevant concepts such as adaptability, agility and flexibility are new as far as the authors know.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Lisa Rowe

This review explores the Confederation of British Industry Education and Skills Annual Report (2018), which considers the issues and challenges facing employers in…

1186

Abstract

Purpose

This review explores the Confederation of British Industry Education and Skills Annual Report (2018), which considers the issues and challenges facing employers in managing future workforce requirements against a backdrop of unprecedented global change. The review examines the evolvement towards the broader competencies of problem solving, resilience, communication and leadership to address concerns of a growing talent shortage. The review incorporates debate surrounding the relevance of student-owned identity, work-based learning, degree apprenticeships, lifelong learning and reflective practice. The purpose of this paper is to share a practitioner’s view of the report and provide a range of recommendations to develop and improve employer and higher education institutions practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This review combines desk research combining an industry-based perspective with a literature review to effectively consider the implications upon current and emerging higher education institutions and employer practice.

Findings

There were a number of key themes which emerged from the report. These include the need for effective, employer-led curriculum design, resilience building strategies, effectively situated workplace learning, the creation of time and space for reflective practice and normalising lifelong learning.

Research limitations/implications

As global change and technology continues to gather pace, skills demands will shift, new programmes and competitors will enter the higher education market and opportunities, funding and resourcing will rapidly change in the context of government policy, impacting upon employer appetite and strategies for supporting lifelong learning. This means that additional findings, beyond those highlighted within this review may emerge in the near future.

Practical implications

There are a number of practical implications in supporting skills development in the workplace from this research. These are reflected in the recommendations and include the development of flexible, innovative and collaborative curricula and effective work-based pedagogies.

Social implications

This review is of particular social relevance at this time because of the alarming fall in part-time and lifelong learning numbers juxtaposed with the threat of funding cuts and United Kingdom Government’s failed initiative to expand the number of apprenticeships in the workplace to 3m new starts by 2020.

Originality/value

This review is based upon one of the first published skills reports of the employers’ perspective within the new apprenticeship policy context in the United Kingdom. As a result, the work offers a unique insight into the emerging challenges and issues encountered by higher education institutions and employers working collaboratively in the twenty-first century business environment.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Shirleyana, Scott Hawken, Riza Yosia Sunindijo and David Sanderson

This paper aims to discuss what people perceive as risks and resilience factors, and how they build everyday resilience.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss what people perceive as risks and resilience factors, and how they build everyday resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focuses on Kampung (literally “village”) Plampitan, a neighbourhood in the inner-city part of Surabaya. The research used field observation, in-depth interviews and workshops during community meetings to collect data.

Findings

The results show how people respond to daily risks and find the support necessary to survive. The problems and risks revealed in the study include crime and economic difficulties, such as unemployment and insufficient income. Coping strategies identified are classified into place-based adaption, people-based network and political network. These strategies can serve as a starting point for local communities to assess their resilience and assist them in enhancing “everyday” resilience.

Originality/value

The paper argues that the concept of resilience must go beyond top-down approaches to disaster risk management and integrate bottom-up understanding from the perspective of local people, especially among marginal and disadvantaged communities. The paper develops the emerging and overlooked concept of “everyday resilience” and suggests that it is essential in surviving both “everyday” or small-scale chronic risks and large-scale disasters.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2022

Rory Mulcahy, Shahab Pourfakhimi, Girish Prayag, Elham Falatoonitoosi and Noel Scott

This study aims to theorise and empirically test a model based on the hierarchy of effects behavioural learning approach (“do-think-feel”) to explain how travel during a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to theorise and empirically test a model based on the hierarchy of effects behavioural learning approach (“do-think-feel”) to explain how travel during a crisis assists consumer well-being. The paper also examines whether the effect travel has on well-being is serially mediated by perceived risk and resilience and moderated by the personality trait of sensation-seeking.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a quasi-experimental design involving Australian consumers based on a sample of n = 307 who had travelled and n = 277 who had not during the COVID-19 pandemic (N = 584). A replication study (N = 290) is also undertaken to assess the robustness of the hierarchy of effects uncovered in the main study. Data were analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM) and Hayes PROCESS macro.

Findings

The results reveal travellers have significantly higher levels of both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being than non-travellers, suggesting the transformative potential of travel experiences during a crisis. The transformative potential of travel is driven by perceived risk and psychological resilience, which mediate the relationship between travel frequency and well-being. Further, spotlight moderation analysis demonstrates that the effect of travel on well-being is most profound for those with lower levels of sensation-seeking. These relationships are also confirmed in the replication study.

Originality/value

This research is among the first in transformative service research (TSR) to test the mediators of perceived risk and resilience together in a singular study, showing how experiences such as travel are potentially transformative. It also evaluates personality traits such as sensation-seeking as a moderating factor, which is uncommon in TSR. Further, this study empirically validates a do–think–feel behavioural learning approach, as opposed to other hierarchy of effects sequences that are dominant in TSR and the wider services marketing literature.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2022

Tracy F. H. Chang, Rebecca N. Baelen, Triya Tessa Ramburn and Pradeep Purandare

The study evaluated the effect of a comprehensive yogic methodology called “Inner Engineering Online” (IEO) on developing positive self-leadership. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The study evaluated the effect of a comprehensive yogic methodology called “Inner Engineering Online” (IEO) on developing positive self-leadership. The authors hypothesized that IEO would equip participants with knowledge and skills to optimize their functioning in major experiential dimensions of the self (body, mind, emotion, and energy) and produce a synergistic effect in enhancing well-being and positive organizational behavior for employees, leaders, and entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a field quasi-experimental one group design with pre- and post-tests. The sample consists of 97 employees, 84 leaders and 76 entrepreneurs in various industries (N = 264).

Findings

The pairwise t-test results show that IEO has a positive effect on well-being (mindfulness, joy, vitality, and restfulness) and positive organizational behavior (meaningful work, psychological capital, and work engagement).

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the lack of a control group. Future research may use a randomized control design to confirm the present findings and explore the mechanisms through which IEO exercises its effect and other positive outcomes.

Practical implications

IEO complements the behavioral and cognitive strategies of self-leadership by including emotional and energetic strategies to produce a synergistic effect on positive outcomes. The program is multi-lingual and scalable and can be implemented in and outside of the organizational settings globally.

Originality/value

The study proposes the concept of positive self-leadership and is the first study to investigate the potentiality of an emerging program for developing positive self-leadership.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 41 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Brent Davies and Barbara J. Davies

Academies are semi‐autonomous schools set up outside the normal local government structures with sponsors from business and charity groups to create new and innovative…

7417

Abstract

Purpose

Academies are semi‐autonomous schools set up outside the normal local government structures with sponsors from business and charity groups to create new and innovative ways of creating and sustaining school transformation. The aim of this paper is to assist in a strategic conversation within the academy movement on talent development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at talent identification, talent development and establishing a talent culture. It provides points in the text for readers to reflect on their own talent practice and provides case examples from current academies.

Findings

The paper shows that the longer‐term sustainability of the academy movement needs to address the key issue of developing leadership talent.

Originality/value

The paper provides an original and useful framework for developing talent management in academies.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2020

Maria Agusti, Jose L. Galan and Francisco J. Acedo

This paper aims to examine what firms in Spanish industrial sectors redeployed their resources, depending on their organisational slack (resource excess), when faced with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine what firms in Spanish industrial sectors redeployed their resources, depending on their organisational slack (resource excess), when faced with the global economic crisis of 2008.

Design/methodology/approach

Various financial measures for slack resources and performance have been analysed from more than 400 Spanish firms from 2006 (pre-crisis) to 2017 (recovery).

Findings

The first finding is that every slack is useful against an economic downturn. The results show how industrial companies use their slack resources when faced with a generalised crisis according to the level of slack possessed. The key role of the available slack against this environmental threatens is remarked.

Research limitations/implications

Not every resource is useful against an economic downturn. The results show how industrial companies use their slack resources when faced with a generalised crisis in accordance with the types and levels of slack. The key role of the liquid resources, in particular cash, against this environmental threat is discussed. However, we also observe the behaviour of firms with only a few excess resources and find very similar resource consumption patterns.

Originality/value

Although organisational slack is a well-known concept in management, few studies deal with how companies consume or use other types of resources when confronting a crisis. This paper not only addresses this question but also offers insights for a detailed evaluation of various types of slack during and after a crisis.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Mahak Sharma and Rajat Sehrawat

This study aims to identify the critical factors (barriers and drivers) influencing the adoption of cloud computing (ACC) in the manufacturing sector in India.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the critical factors (barriers and drivers) influencing the adoption of cloud computing (ACC) in the manufacturing sector in India.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a mixed methodology approach is used. Interviews are conducted to investigate factors (drivers and barriers) influencing the ACC, which are further categorized as controllable determinants (weaknesses and strengths) and uncontrollable determinants (threats and opportunities) using a SWOT analysis. Fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (FAHP) has been utilized to highlight the most critical drivers as well as barriers. Finally, decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) has been used to find the cause-effect relationships among factors and their influence on the decision of adoption.

Findings

The manufacturing sector is in the digital and value change transformation phase with Industry 4.0, that is, the next industrial revolution. The 24 critical factors influencing ACC are subdivided into strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. The FAHP analysis ranked time to market, competitive advantage, business agility, data confidentiality and lack of government policy standards as the most critical factors. The cause-effect relationships highlight that time to market is the most significant causal factor, and resistance to technology is the least significant effect factor. The results of the study elucidate that the strengths of ACC are appreciably more than its weaknesses.

Research limitations/implications

This study couples the technology acceptance model (TAM) with technology-organization-environment (TOE) framework and adds an economic perspective to examine the significant influences of ACC in the Indian manufacturing sector. Further, it contributes to the knowledge of ACC in general and provides valuable insights into interrelationships among factors influencing the decision and strategies of adoption in particular.

Originality/value

This is the first scholarly work in the Indian manufacturing sector that uses the analysis from SWOT and FAHP approach as a base for identifying cause-effect relationships between the critical factors influencing ACC. Further, based on the extant literature and analysis of this work, an adoption framework has been proposed that justifies that ACC is not just a technological challenge but is also an environmental, economic and organizational challenge that includes organizational issues, costs and need for adequate government policies.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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