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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Joan Marques, Svetlana Holt and Virginia Green

The purpose of the paper is to share practices with other scholars who are on the outlook for different, more rewarding ways of facilitating formal management education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to share practices with other scholars who are on the outlook for different, more rewarding ways of facilitating formal management education, and to invite feedback and additional suggestions from colleagues in formal and informal educational settings about additional approaches that make a positive difference.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is structured in a sequential format, presenting the three contributors’ practices in separate sections, yet unifying them through a coherent structure of a brief course description, a description of the creative infusion, and some sample implementations.

Findings

Management courses that focus on creativity, involvement, interaction, and a trans‐disciplinary approach, ensure greater cohesion between left‐ and right‐brain thinking.

Practical implications

Management in an increasingly diversifying yet intertwining work environment brings along challenges that have not been encountered before. Some teaching scholars in higher education consider this challenge problematic, but others perceive it as a wonderful opportunity toward more effective and rewarding approaches to learning and communicating.

Originality/value

This paper presents a valuable piece of evidence, albeit on a minute scale, that scholars who engage in practice‐based management education and include elements from the real world in their courses, experience enhanced gratification within themselves and from their students.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Andani Thakhathi

Contemporary organizations are facing an operating environment characterized by volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous, and “permanent whitewater.” To sustain high…

Abstract

Contemporary organizations are facing an operating environment characterized by volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous, and “permanent whitewater.” To sustain high performance in this context, organizations must be able to change and develop as efficiently and effectively as possible. Within organizations, there are actors who catalyze and advance change in this manner; these actors are known as “champions.” Yet the scholar who wishes to conduct research concerning champions of change and organizational development is likely to be met by a highly fragmented literature. Varying notions of champions are scattered throughout extant research, where authors of articles cite different sources when conceptualizing champions; often superficially. Furthermore, many types of highly specific and nuanced non-generalizable champions have proliferated, making it difficult for practitioners and researchers to discover useful findings on how to go about making meaningful changes in their context. The purpose of this study was to address these problems for practitioners and researchers by engendering thoroughness, clarity, and coherence within champion scholarship. This was done by conducting the first comprehensive, critical yet insightful review of the champion literature within the organizational sciences using content analysis to re-conceptualize champions and develop a meaningful typology from which the field can be advanced. The chapter first suggests a return to Schön (1963) as the basis from which to conceptualize champions and, second, offers a typology consisting of 10 meta-champions of organizational change and development – Collaboration, Human Rights, Innovation, Product, Project, Service, Strategic, Sustainability, Technology, and Venture Champions – from which change practice and future research can benefit.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-351-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Jan Jonker

States that the concept of the “classical” organisation is undoubtedly in transition. As a result new organisational concepts emerge. Addresses the nature of quality…

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472

Abstract

States that the concept of the “classical” organisation is undoubtedly in transition. As a result new organisational concepts emerge. Addresses the nature of quality management and assurance in “organisations under construction”. Starting with a brief overview of the characteristics of new organisations, blending into the concept of the “individualised company”. The assets of such a company are its core competencies linked to people. The question is: how do existing theories and practices of quality management fit in with these new organisational concepts? To provide the beginning of an answer a new quality approach labelled “personal quality management’ is explored. The essence is that quality management becomes more and more an individual responsibility. Some narrative empirical evidence is provided to support the development of this approach.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1996

Donald Skilling

Seeks to help managers and human resource practitioners understand better why many change efforts (business process re‐engineering, total quality management) often end in…

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1299

Abstract

Seeks to help managers and human resource practitioners understand better why many change efforts (business process re‐engineering, total quality management) often end in failure. Outlines an approach that can result in more change success. Explores the human side of change with a primary focus on the psychological reorientation that organizations and their people go through as they come to terms with change in their environments. The reorientation involves three key phases ‐ endings, in‐between times and new beginnings. Discusses each of these phases and their corresponding activities. Presents recommendations for effectively moving through each of the three phases and for achieving overall change success.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Donna Burnett and Kim James

Describes an empirical research study focusing on a specific form ofpersonal development for managers – the use of the outdoors. Thisdevelopment activity is believed to…

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978

Abstract

Describes an empirical research study focusing on a specific form of personal development for managers – the use of the outdoors. This development activity is believed to enhance managers′ understanding of themselves and the ways in which they interact with others, enabling them to operate more effectively in today′s turbulent business environment. Four outcome hypotheses were tested: increased self‐awareness, increased ability to “learn how to learn”, positive changes to individual′s self‐concept and increased use of “openness” behaviours. Both qualitative and quantitative data were used in testing the hypotheses. Although discrepancies arose between the qualitative and quantitative results, they do indicate that participants in the programme realized higher levels of self‐esteem and reported increased use of “openness” behaviours six months after the end of the programme.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 13 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Ronald E. Purser, Allen C. Bluedorn and Jack Petranker

New ways of managing change have run aground on the uncritical acceptance of a limited view of temporality, identified here as causal-time. Because it emphasizes identity…

Abstract

New ways of managing change have run aground on the uncritical acceptance of a limited view of temporality, identified here as causal-time. Because it emphasizes identity and state-transitions, causal-time is inherently static and past-centered. An alternative view, called flow-time, emphasizes the dynamic of the always arriving future. The claim is made that a future-centered temporality gives access to the knowledge change agents need to cope with accelerating and ongoing change.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-167-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Walter McFarland and David Jestaz

– The purpose of this paper is to suggest a relationship between talent development and organizational change, and to invite more research on this topic.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest a relationship between talent development and organizational change, and to invite more research on this topic.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a viewpoint of the authors and not a research paper. It is designed to stimulate thinking and research.

Findings

There are no findings. The paper suggests that the expanded use of talent development interventions may improve workforce engagement in organizational change and invites more thinking and research.

Research limitations/implications

It is not a research piece, a viewpoint only.

Practical implications

One practical implication of future research is to better understand the link between neuroscience, talent development and change if any.

Social implications

Several indicators– including Gallup’s most recent Global Workforce Study are suggesting profoundly low levels of employee engagement globally. One reason suggested in sheer volume and complexity of organizational change. In effect, people may be overwhelmed. Better understanding how to engage people generally, and specifically during times of large-scale organizational change may contribute to both the working lives of people and to overall organizational performance. For this reason, more research is needed.

Originality/value

The link between talent development and organizational change has, for the most part, not been explored in the research literature. The potential value of brain science in informing this link has not been explored either. For the most part, the connections discussed here are original and, with rigorous research, could inform employee engagement and organizational change.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 48 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1993

David C. Nicoll

Presents a case study which illustrates the use of employeecommunications in implementing corporate culture change, by reference tothe concept of value statements. The…

Abstract

Presents a case study which illustrates the use of employee communications in implementing corporate culture change, by reference to the concept of value statements. The study utilized structured interviews, questionnaires, participant observation and unobtrusive measures. Suggests that organizational group structure plays a role in determining familiarity with corporate value statements, but plays little part in their subsequent practice. Provides evidence of a “values gap” whereby values are understood but are not subsequently put into practice. Provides evidence to suggest that a “tall” organization structure will be less likely to be viewed as practising its own value statements than a flatter organization structure. Suggests possible rationales behind this, and means by which this may be overcome.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Brad C. Anderson

Abstract

Details

Values, Rationality, and Power: Developing Organizational Wisdom
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-942-2

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Joan F. Marques

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the need for critical review and realignment of business education as well as business practices to contemporary needs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the need for critical review and realignment of business education as well as business practices to contemporary needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes two compelling presentations from distinguished scholars in which they made a seemingly contradictory statement about the discrepancy between business education and practice. Subsequently, a critical analysis of the presentations is applied, through which some remarkable similarities emerge.

Findings

The paper finds that: there is a discrepancy between what business education knows and what it does; there is a discrepancy between what business knows and what it does; and the discrepancy on both ends should be attributed to multiple reasons, of which the most important one is: the resistance to adopt the change that epitomizes contemporary circumstances.

Practical implications

Management and organizational behavior scholars should rethink their stance toward educating and preparing today's business students for the ambiguous workplace that awaits them. At the same time, business practitioners should start adopting reward practices that fit today's predominantly organic work environments.

Originality/value

This paper presents a viewpoint that is still rejected and considered unpopular among large groups of scholars who insist on a quantifiable and highly theoretical underpinning of their teachings, even though they are confronted with an increasing gap between their teachings and writings, and the highly volatile reality.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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