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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Mahmut Kayar

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of perfume on cotton fabrics and satisfy the perfume user’s curiosity on this issue.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of perfume on cotton fabrics and satisfy the perfume user’s curiosity on this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the selected perfume was applied on woven and knitted cotton fabric samples in order to investigate the effects of perfume on mechanical and colour properties of the fabrics. For this purpose the chosen perfume was applied in two different amounts (four spraying and eight spraying) from the same distance to the fabric surface. Then the fabric samples were left for 24 hours in order to fulfill the daily usage conditions. Samples were evaluated in terms of tensile strength, pilling and abrasion tests, respectively. Colour measurement test was performed for investigating the fading effect of the perfume and FTIR analysis was carried out for examining the chemical changes.

Findings

Result of the study revealed that perfume did not have any effects on tensile strength properties of cotton knitted and woven fabrics and caused serious decrease in pilling and abrasion values and negatively affected colour characteristics of fabrics.

Originality/value

In literature there was no study investigating the effect of perfume on mechanical and colour properties of garment. Thus this study will be the first concerning this issue.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Book part
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Priyanka Lalwani

The origin of perfumery can be traced back to the true cradle of human civilization and culture in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt. The world’s first referenced chemist was…

Abstract

The origin of perfumery can be traced back to the true cradle of human civilization and culture in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt. The world’s first referenced chemist was a perfumer named Tapputi-Belatekallim who lived in Babylon more than 3,000 years ago. She used her intimate knowledge of chemistry to develop various formulations and techniques to revolutionize the process of perfumery creation. Similarly, Ajmal is one of the first companies in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) to have pioneered the science and art of perfumery creation. This case study describes the inspiring journey of Ajmal Perfumes which began in the farms of a small village located in Hojai, Assam, to becoming a world-class perfumer with a global reach of over 45 countries. From “Farm to Flacon,” (Flacon a.k.a glass bottle) the company’s perfect control over their seamless value chain has enabled them to sustainably grow their business while maintaining high standards of quality. Their performance across five major dimensions (finance, market, processes, people, and corporate social responsibility [CSR]) is used to gauge their success. In this case analysis, the strategic framework behind the success of Ajmal Perfumes is captured. Transformational Leadership (TL), Customer Centricity (CC), Intrapreneurial Behavior (IB), Total Quality Management (TQM), Innovation Success (IS), Absorptive Capacity (AC), and CSR are identified as their key drivers of success. A critical review of existing literature related to success drivers was also undertaken that brought forward knowledge gaps and future areas of research in the domain of TQM and AC.

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2018

Kavitha Krishnamoorthi and Srinivasan Jagannathan

The purpose of this paper is to present a laboratory-based test method to evaluate colourfastness of silk fabrics when perfumes are applied on it.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a laboratory-based test method to evaluate colourfastness of silk fabrics when perfumes are applied on it.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different simple methods like simple spray method, rubbing and perspirometer were used. In simple spray method, standard quantity was sprayed from constant distance. In rubbing fastness tester, perfume sprayed fabric was subjected to rubbing. Similarly, perfume sprayed fabric was kept in perspirometer similar to perspiration fastness testing method. As a new method, perfume applied fabric was again treated with perspiration solution and colour change and staining were observed.

Findings

On comparing the different methods, it is suggested that method using fabric applied with both perfume and perspiration solution kept in perspirometer will simulate actual wearing condition and will give the actual effect of Perfume on fabric colour.

Originality/value

So far, no standard method is available. Hence, this test method will enable fabric manufacturers, perfume manufacturers and customers to be aware of effect of perfumes on fabric colour and aesthetics.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2018

Mohammed Z. Salem

The purpose of this paper is to examine perfume packaging in Spain and its effects on Basque female consumers’ purchase decision. The study population was made up of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine perfume packaging in Spain and its effects on Basque female consumers’ purchase decision. The study population was made up of females, as they represent the highest consumer in the perfume market, accounting for 67 percent of the total perfume sales (Trufragance.com). Furthermore, in the past few years the perfume industry has basically targeted females (McIntyre, 2013).

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was conducted using a questionnaire to collect primary data in order to test the hypotheses. The questionnaire was distributed to 400 randomly selected respondents, from the general female population.

Findings

The findings show a relationship between the independent variables (i.e. visual packaging design, verbal packaging design, and packaging benefits) and the dependent variable (i.e. consumer purchase decision) based on several reasons discussed thoroughly in this paper. Additionally, age, education level, marital status, monthly income, and employment category of sample subjects influence the effect of perfume packaging on purchase decisions.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is the use of simple random sampling. The research findings bear important implications for more functional, emotional, environmental, and socially responsible marketing practice where packaging is concerned.

Practical implications

The findings of this study contribute to the understanding of packaging as a strategic marketing tool and how it can significantly influence the female’s purchase decision. Thus, giving managers and marketers a competitive advantage in this increasingly growing market. A new concept and measurement scale is presented that can be used for identifying creative packaging design and its benefits.

Originality/value

This study remains one of few research works focusing on the four dimensions of packaging benefits: functional, social, emotional, and environmental. Furthermore, it attempts to fulfill the identified need for encompassing potential and generally accepted packaging elements, including both the visual and verbal elements. Therefore, the uniqueness of this study arises from its examination of both aspects simultaneously, which has been ignored in previous research.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Nisachon Tantiseneepong, Matthew Gorton and John White

The purpose of this paper is to utilise projective techniques as a method to capture and understand consumer reactions to celebrity‐endorsed perfumes. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to utilise projective techniques as a method to capture and understand consumer reactions to celebrity‐endorsed perfumes. The paper illustrates how projective techniques can aid practitioners in their selection of celebrity endorsers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is part of a wider tradition of returning to qualitative methods when research based on existing theories offers only partial or little support for them. In total, 16 females participated in the study, which utilised a range of projective techniques, including picture association. For the latter, participants were exposed first to advertisements for two leading perfumes alone and then these advertisements incorporating four contrasting celebrity endorsers. Associations and reactions to the advertisements with and without celebrity endorsers were compared.

Findings

The analysis identifies that celebrity endorsers may have a significant impact on the perceived target market for a product, highlighting their potential role in repositioning a brand. However, the celebrity may crowd out the endorsed product. The role of personal liking is critical, although this is ignored in existing source models of celebrity endorsement.

Originality/value

The application of projective techniques demonstrates their usefulness in capturing responses to celebrity endorsements. The paper uncovers some of the reasons why previous research has generated results that only partially support the existing main theoretical frameworks.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Book part
Publication date: 11 March 2021

Rinad Zuhair A. AlQurashi

This is the case of an iconic brand from the Middle East, Abdul Samad Al-Qureshi Company (ASQ), which registered an admirable growth to become a global brand. ASQ was…

Abstract

This is the case of an iconic brand from the Middle East, Abdul Samad Al-Qureshi Company (ASQ), which registered an admirable growth to become a global brand. ASQ was established in 1932 in Makkah, Al-Haram al-Sharif, the Holy Mosque. The company’s mission is to provide high-quality perfume products in the Arabian Peninsula. The company has different departments which work together to ensure that it achieves its objectives and has an extensive presence in the UAE. The company has seen a substantial increase in the number of staff members while sales have increased significantly. The customers’ satisfaction rate grew immensely resulting in the continuous number of awards that the company for its performance. The major drivers of success at ASQ are strong brand image, customer satisfaction, quality product, effective employee training programs, unique market offerings, and market research.

Details

Corporate Success Stories in the UAE: The Key Drivers Behind Their Growth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-579-7

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Joseph L. Scarpaci, Eloise Coupey and Sara Desvernine Reed

Communicating the national values of artists and the role of product benefits as symbols of national values, infuse iconic national brands. This paper aims to validate a…

Abstract

Purpose

Communicating the national values of artists and the role of product benefits as symbols of national values, infuse iconic national brands. This paper aims to validate a conceptual framework that offers empirical insights for cultural identity that drives brand management.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies and cross-cultural focus group research establish the present study’s conceptual framework for cultural branding.

Findings

Brand awareness of a perfume named after a Cuban dancer and a spirit named for a Chilean poet, reflect authentic emblems of national identity. Informants’ behavior confirms the study’s model of icon myth transfer effect as a heuristic for cultural branding with clear, detailed and unprompted references to the myths and brands behind these heroines.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s ethnography shows how artists reflect myth and folklore in iconic brands. Future research should assess whether the icon myth transfer effect as a heuristic for cultural branding occurs with cultural icons beyond the arts and transcends national boundaries.

Practical implications

The study challenges conventional branding, where the brand is the myth, and the myth reflects the myth market. The authors show how the myth connects to a national identity yet exists independently of the brand. The branding strategy ties the brand to the existing myth, an alternative route for cultural branding mediated by the icon myth transfer effect.

Social implications

These two Latin American brands provide a much-needed connection among the branding literatures and images surrounding gender and nationalism in lesser-known markets.

Originality/value

Most research explores iconic myths, brands and folklore in one country. This study extends cultural branding through social history and by testing a conceptual model that establishes how myths embody nation-specific values. Iconic myths are a heuristic for understanding and describing brands, revealing an unexamined path for cultural branding.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Victoria Seitz

In the advertising of self‐projective products, marketers have focused on image advertising. However, today advertisers are integrating direct response with image based…

Abstract

In the advertising of self‐projective products, marketers have focused on image advertising. However, today advertisers are integrating direct response with image based advertising, in essence, to “get more bang for the buck”. Hence, the purpose of the study was to investigate direct response advertising in upscale fashion magazines in the European Union as well as the USA. Eight hundred and seventy advertisements of perfumes, women’s apparel and cosmetics were evaluated via the editions of Vogue. Direct response advertisements were most prevalent among advertisements of women’s apparel and primarily in US editions of Vogue. Furthermore, advertisements for perfumes and women’s apparel were image based while advertisements for cosmetics were balanced. Implications of the findings are given regarding advertising fashion products in the European Community.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 98 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 31 July 2017

Girish Taneja

The case has been designed specifically for a Brand Management course. However, it can be used for a basic course in marketing management.

Abstract

Subject area

The case has been designed specifically for a Brand Management course. However, it can be used for a basic course in marketing management.

Study level/applicability

The case has been developed for the students of MBA or Executive MBA. The case needs to be taught after the students have understood the concepts of the marketing mix, segmentation, targeting and the basics of marketing strategy to ensure effective learning.

Case overview

The case discusses the entrepreneurial journey of Parminder Sandhu. Sandhu initiated an entrepreneurial venture by launching a brand of perfume in India. Parminder, with his business partner Arun, got the idea of using the brand name “Next” from Next Plc store while travelling around in the UK. Subsequently, “Next Care” successfully launched two product lines “Next” and “English Leather” and offered 51 SKUs. “Next Care” became the third highest selling perfume brand firm in India. “Next Care” suffered a setback when one of their factories was raided by “Lacoste” and had to stop production of one brand extension “Nextcare Crocodile” due to the deceptively similar logo. Parminder learned that “Next Plc” was planning to open its stores and may launch the NXT brand of perfumes in India. Sandhu, Mahajan and Wadhawan have been debating whether they should continue with the “Next” brand name.

Expected learning outcomes

The expected learning outcomes are as follows: to appreciate the marketing and legal perspective of a brand name; to introduce the concept of deceptively similar brands and implications of the same on the business; and to understand the process of brand name registration.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2013

N. A. Ibrahim, Z. M. El-Sayed, H. M. Fahmy, A. G. Hassabo and M. H. Abo-Shosha

The inclusion of softeners (20 g/l), namely, Siligen VN (silicon based), Basosoft SWK (cationic), or Leomin NI (nonionic), in a dimethyloldihydroxy ethylene urea (DMDHEU…

Abstract

The inclusion of softeners (20 g/l), namely, Siligen VN (silicon based), Basosoft SWK (cationic), or Leomin NI (nonionic), in a dimethyloldihydroxy ethylene urea (DMDHEU, 50 g/l) finishing formulation of 65/35 cotton/polyester blended fabric, enhances the resiliency of the fabric, which is expressed as the dry wrinkle recovery angle (WRA). The fabric acquires the ability to keep a rose oil fragrance upon storage up to 3 months. Improving the WRA and acquiring the ability to keep the fragrance can be descendingly arranged as follows: Siligen VN>Basosoft SWK>Leomin NI. Increasing the Siligen VN concentration (0-30 g/l) in the finishing formulation is accompanied by a small increase in the WRA, and a noticeable enhancement in the ability to keep the rose oil fragrance upon storage. By increasing the rose oil concentration (100-300 g/l) in a perfumed bath of cross-linked/Siligen VN, the softened fabric is accompanied by a slight drop in the WRA, and a decreasing ability to keep the fragrance up to 3 months.

However, the extent of the fragrance is higher at higher rose oil concentrations, regardless of the storage time. The ability of the fabric to keep the fragrance can be attributed to solubilization and/or encapsulation of the perfume in the oleophilic segments of the softener, and its slow release with time, so that the smell can be sensed. This ability decreases after increasing the storage time up to 3 months, and depending on the type of perfume oil used, is descendingly arranged as follows: jasmine oil > rose oil > sandal oil.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

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