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Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Paul E. Levy, Steven T. Tseng, Christopher C. Rosen and Sarah B. Lueke

In recent years, practitioners have identified a number of problems with traditional performance management (PM) systems, arguing that PM is broken and needs to be fixed…

Abstract

In recent years, practitioners have identified a number of problems with traditional performance management (PM) systems, arguing that PM is broken and needs to be fixed. In this chapter, we review criticisms of traditional PM practices that have been mentioned by journalists and practitioners and we consider the solutions that they have presented for addressing these concerns. We then consider these problems and solutions within the context of extant scholarly research and identify (a) what organizations should do going forward to improve PM practices (i.e., focus on feedback processes, ensure accountability throughout the PM system, and align the PM system with organizational strategy) and (b) what scholars should focus research attention on (i.e., technology, strategic alignment, and peer-to-peer accountability) in order to reduce the science-practice gap in this domain.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Jennifer A. Farris, Eileen M. van Aken, Geert Letens, Pimsinee Chearksul and Garry Coleman

The purpose of this paper is to describe and illustrate an application of a structured approach to assess and improve an organization's performance measurement review process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and illustrate an application of a structured approach to assess and improve an organization's performance measurement review process.

Design/methodology/approach

This approach was implemented within an ongoing action research project in a large telecommunications organization. Assessment elements were defined based on literature review, and the assessment approach was designed based on performance excellence frameworks such as Baldrige and EFQM. Data collection included interviews, observations, and document review, and an external assessment team was used.

Findings

The approach can be used to generate useful and actionable feedback for leadership to increase the effectiveness of the performance measurement review process and can also be used as a reference framework for establishing an effective performance review process initially.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive yet detailed methodology for assessing the performance review process. This methodology is more targeted in scope than measurement system assessment tools emerging in the literature. Practitioners can gain specific feedback to improve the performance review process. Researchers benefit by having a more standard, structured approach for collecting and codifying detailed observations and artifacts when studying the performance review process.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Manoochehr Najmi, John Rigas and Ip‐Shing Fan

This paper aims to describe a structured review framework for managing business performance. The framework entails the review of business performance, including the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a structured review framework for managing business performance. The framework entails the review of business performance, including the strategic relevance of the measures, as well as the efficiency and effectiveness of the performance measurement system itself.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of approaches and tools are employed in the framework, which features a review card providing a high‐level view of the review process, showing the different types of review perspectives and their interactions.

Findings

The performance measurement system of an organisation is a mechanism to manage and control the organisation. Maintaining the effectiveness of the organisation and the measurement systems requires a systematic review process. The process of reviewing performance is a complex task that spans the whole organisation. A good review process seeks the correct balance between organisational benefits and the effort required.

Originality/value

Overall, the framework presented provides a structured path of performance review in a methodical and effective manner. This is useful for practitioners to apply and adapt in their situations.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Manoochehr Najmi, Mohammad Etebari and Samin Emami

The purpose of this paper is to develop an exclusive review framework for the Performance Prism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an exclusive review framework for the Performance Prism.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature survey on performance measurement is used to identify the main aspects of the review in such systems. Various dimensions related to the characteristics of Performance Prism are explored. All the findings are then rationally put together to develop the proposed conceptual framework.

Findings

The paper presents a conceptual model to review performance measurement systems (PMS) which are designed based on Performance Prism. The presented framework categorizes review processes and tools into two main categories; Business Performance Review (BPRw) and Performance Measurement System Review (PMSR). In BPRw, a loop is presented in three levels – with regards to the five facets of Performance Prism – which indicates the performance management process. PMSR deals with reviewing the efficiency and effectiveness of the design and implementation of the PMS itself. Several methods and tools have been gathered from the literature (e.g. relevance test, measures profile, etc) in this section to examine the relevance of measures, and some have been introduced (including a method to determine inconsistencies in organization's performance trends between stakeholder, strategic and operational level) to study and challenge the validity of strategic assumptions and strategies, and appropriateness of infrastructure. Implications of various factors such as organizational culture, change management, and characteristics of the measures (level of the measure, managers who receive reports including the measure, and supporting infrastructure) are highlighted.

Research limitations/implications

In contrast to PMS design and implementation, research on PMS review is limited. This is more evident in the literature concerning Performance Prism. The empirical evidence of usefulness is beyond the scope of this article.

Practical implications

The framework provides a procedural action for reviewing both business performance and PMS performance when applying the Performance Prism in practice and provides a foundation for further empirical research.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the body of literature, by proposing a comprehensive review framework to be used in Performance Prism.

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Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2016

Jan van Helden and Christoph Reichard

An examination of the commonalities and differences between performance management practices in the public and private sector.

Abstract

Purpose

An examination of the commonalities and differences between performance management practices in the public and private sector.

Methodology/approach

A literature review of 100 publications in international academic journals over the last 20 years.

Findings

The chapter develops a framework which links the dimensions of the public/private-distinction (ownership, funding, control and type of goals) to the design and use of performance management systems (PMS). This framework subsequently informs a literature review, which can be summarised as follows: Multi-dimensionality of the PMS is core in both public and private sector organisations, but quite many private sector papers point to a financial focus at the top of the PMS, while public sector organisations show a broad variety of performance indicators, including those on societally relevant goals. In addition, a link between the PMS and strategies can be found in the public and the private sector, but the match between different strategies and PMS design is more elaborated in the private sector. These findings are largely in accordance with our expectations. The review also finds support for the assumption that performance information in public sector organisations is primarily used for external accountability reasons, while internal managerial control is the main purpose in private firms. The use of performance information is quite intensive and mostly functional in both sectors, which does not meet our expectations. Overall, the differences between performance management practices in the public and private sector are less stringent than expected.

Research limitations

Due to limited evidence about the importance of performance-related pay systems and no evidence about targeting in both sectors, a more focused literature review on these issues would be desirable.

Practical implications

Mutual learning between both sectors, for example the public sector can learn from the private sector on how to link strategy to the PMS and the private sector can learn from the public sector about serving a multitude of stakeholders in the PMS.

Originality/value

A comprehensive review of performance management practices in the public and private sector.

Details

Performance Measurement and Management Control: Contemporary Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-915-2

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Article
Publication date: 23 April 2019

Susan Shortland and Stephen J. Perkins

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of organisational performance and development review policy and practice on women’s access to international careers via…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of organisational performance and development review policy and practice on women’s access to international careers via long-term expatriate assignments in the oil and gas industry, with a specific focus on women’s perceptions of procedural justice.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative cross-sectional case study research design is used to analyse performance and development review, and international assignment policies in two firms, together with in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 14 Human Resource policy custodians and 21 female long-term current assignees.

Findings

Women assignees do not see performance and development reviews as effective mechanisms to access expatriate roles. Nonetheless, women use these procedures while also operating within senior male networks to signal their desire to expatriate.

Research limitations/implications

This study identifies differences between organisational policy objectives and policy implementation, and female assignees’ experiences and expectations of accessing expatriate roles. Women’s perceptions of organisational justice are not harmed because women place more emphasis on process and conversations than on policy. Research propositions are suggested extending organisational justice theory.

Practical implications

Clear articulation of performance and development review processes aids organisational succession planning. Formalised, transparent expatriate career management supports women’s access to expatriation. The roles of key personnel in determining access to expatriate career paths require clarification.

Originality/value

This paper extends our knowledge of women’s organisationally assigned expatriate careers and perceptions of procedural justice. Women use performance and development reviews to access expatriate opportunities. Employer action aligned to policy intent could help increase female expatriate participation.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Sheng Huang, Yunxia Zhu, Kun Zhang and Zhenkuo Ding

The purpose of this paper is to critically review and synthesize the articles on determinants of international new venture (INV) performance to identify the research gaps…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically review and synthesize the articles on determinants of international new venture (INV) performance to identify the research gaps in this area and develop a future research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a semi-systematic review approach with a fucus on using a vote-counting technique, this paper reviews 99 journal articles published between 1994 and 2019 to assess the determinants of INV performance.

Findings

The results indicate that the majority of the INV performance articles employ a clearly specified theoretical foundation, focus on INVs in developed economies and non-service sectors, identify numerous firm-level determinants of INV performance and use advanced statistical methods (e.g. structural equation modeling and panel data models). However, the research of INV performance is still limited by a lack of a broader integration of theories at different levels, inconsistent theoretical predictions and empirical results, knowledge gaps, and estimation biases (e.g. endogeneity).

Originality/value

INV performance has received increasing attention over recent decades, but this area is still characterized by fragmentation and inconsistency. This paper provides a comprehensive and nuanced review that synthesizes and clarifies our current knowledge on the determinants of INV performance, provides further discussion with deeper insights from both theoretical and methodological aspects, and points out some directions for future research.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 10 March 2021

YooHee Hwang, Xingyu Wang and Aysin Pașamehmetoġlu

Online reviews are perceived as credible and trustworthy across various business sectors; thus, they influence customers’ purchase decisions. However, the potential role…

Abstract

Purpose

Online reviews are perceived as credible and trustworthy across various business sectors; thus, they influence customers’ purchase decisions. However, the potential role of customer online reviews as feedback for employee performance and employee reactions to customer reviews remain largely unclear. To address this knowledge gap, this study proposes that employee characteristics, namely, self-efficacy (Study 1) and moral identity (Study 2), moderate the effect of the valence of customer reviews on hospitality employees’ helping behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a scenario-based, quasi-experimental design in two studies. They recruited a total of 215 frontline employees at independent casual dining restaurants in Istanbul, Turkey (Study 1) and 226 US residents who have worked in the restaurant industry for more than six months (Study 2). Multiple linear regressions via PROCESS and moderation analysis via Johnson–Neyman technique were used.

Findings

Study 1 demonstrates that when employees’ self-efficacy is low, positive (vs negative) customer reviews enhance employees’ helping behavior. By contrast, when employees’ self-efficacy is high, their helping behavior is invariantly high regardless of the valence of customer reviews. Study 2 reveals that when employees’ moral identity is low, their helping behavior decreases in the presence of negative (vs positive) customer reviews. Conversely, when employees’ moral identity is high, their helping behavior is similarly high regardless of the valence of customer reviews.

Practical implications

Hospitality managers may need to develop training programs to enhance their employees’ self-efficacy and moral identity. They may also provide necessary organizational support to induce their employees’ self-efficacy and moral identity, given that such psychological resources help buffer the dampening effect of negative reviews on helping behavior. Last, hospitality managers may consider incorporating customer reviews as part of employee performance feedback.

Originality/value

This study advances the understanding of employees’ responses to customer reviews, with the performance appraisal feedback framework as fresh theoretical lens. This study is among the first to demonstrate the relationship between the valence of customer reviews and subsequent helping behavior of employees toward customers. It also contributes to the emerging literature that identifies boundary conditions for employees’ responses to customer reviews.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Edem M. Azila-Gbettor, Ben Q. Honyenuga, Marta M. Berent-Braun and Ad Kil

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review and examine extant knowledge on corporate governance structures (CGS) and performance relation within family firm and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review and examine extant knowledge on corporate governance structures (CGS) and performance relation within family firm and set the agenda for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyses the content of 159 empirical articles retrieved mainly from Google Scholar and published between 2000 and 2016 in 61 highly ranked journals across different disciplines.

Findings

The review reveals fixation on quantitative approach and its associated techniques in examining CGS and performance nexus. The results from the review demonstrate heterogeneous relation between measures of CGS and performance. Suggestions for further studies include: measurement of non-economic performance of the family firm and incorporation of moderators and mediators from the organizations’ environment through the adoption of multilevel research.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this review include: first, issues relating to key/search terms and journals used for the study; this may not be exhaustive and hence likely to lead to omission of key publications. Second, scholarly attention in terms of empirical studies on family governance, including family council, family assembly and family constitution, has been scarce (Suess, 2014; Klein, 2008; Witt, 2008); hence family governance is outside the scope of this review. In sum, future work may explore other keywords and publications not used in this review and consider review of family governance.

Originality/value

The authors offer a multidisciplinary conceptual framework that synthesizes and integrates the existing literature on CGS across different disciplines within family firms. This provides researchers across different disciplines a common platform for interdisciplinary discourse.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Olivia Guerra-Santin, Aidan Christopher Tweed and Maria Gabriela Zapata-Lancaster

The purpose of this paper is to determine the usability of design reviews to inform designers about low carbon technologies and building performance. The design review of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the usability of design reviews to inform designers about low carbon technologies and building performance. The design review of three domestic and two non-domestic case studies are evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection and analysis methods include interviews and meetings with design teams and contractors, design tools audit and revision of drawings and project documentation. In addition, building's envelope and systems, and in-use performance evaluations are used to inform design teams about the actual performance of the buildings.

Findings

This study showed that targets and intentions defined in the design process are not always compatible or reality checked. These contradictions between targets within a project can undermine the performance of a building. The design review can identify unrealistic expectations to assess fairly the performance of buildings. The study showed that changes made during construction to the original design are related to lack of specifications or experience with low carbon technologies. Design reviews can help designers to identify the knowledge gaps within their practice. Furthermore, the results showed that building-related energy consumption was close to expectations, while user-related consumption was higher than expected due to occupancy assumptions made during the design. The design review showed that designers require more knowledge about buildings’ in-use performance in order to take informed-based design decisions.

Originality/value

This paper showed the main stages of a design review, and their usability to assess building performance and to inform designers. The results of this study suggest that designs can benefit from design reviews by learning about low carbon technologies installation and building's operation.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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