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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Susan Shortland and Stephen J. Perkins

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of organisational performance and development review policy and practice on women’s access to international careers via…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of organisational performance and development review policy and practice on women’s access to international careers via long-term expatriate assignments in the oil and gas industry, with a specific focus on women’s perceptions of procedural justice.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative cross-sectional case study research design is used to analyse performance and development review, and international assignment policies in two firms, together with in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 14 Human Resource policy custodians and 21 female long-term current assignees.

Findings

Women assignees do not see performance and development reviews as effective mechanisms to access expatriate roles. Nonetheless, women use these procedures while also operating within senior male networks to signal their desire to expatriate.

Research limitations/implications

This study identifies differences between organisational policy objectives and policy implementation, and female assignees’ experiences and expectations of accessing expatriate roles. Women’s perceptions of organisational justice are not harmed because women place more emphasis on process and conversations than on policy. Research propositions are suggested extending organisational justice theory.

Practical implications

Clear articulation of performance and development review processes aids organisational succession planning. Formalised, transparent expatriate career management supports women’s access to expatriation. The roles of key personnel in determining access to expatriate career paths require clarification.

Originality/value

This paper extends our knowledge of women’s organisationally assigned expatriate careers and perceptions of procedural justice. Women use performance and development reviews to access expatriate opportunities. Employer action aligned to policy intent could help increase female expatriate participation.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Peter Greenan

In light of contemporary shifts away from annual appraisals, this study aims to explore the implications of using a personal development plan (PDP) as a means of focussing…

Abstract

Purpose

In light of contemporary shifts away from annual appraisals, this study aims to explore the implications of using a personal development plan (PDP) as a means of focussing on continuous feedback and development to improve individual performance and ultimately organisational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through an employee survey in one private sector organisation in the UK finance sector using a case study approach. Secondary data in the form of completed PDPs were used to compare and contrast responses to the survey.

Findings

Results indicate that the diagnostic stage is generally effective, but support for the PDP and development activity post diagnosis is less visible. Implications of this are that time spent in the diagnostic stage is unproductive and could impact on motivation and self-efficacy of employees. Furthermore, for the organisation to adopt a continuous focus on development via PDPs would necessitate a systematic training programme to effect a change in culture.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to one organisation in one sector which reduces the generalisability of results. Research methods were limited to anonymous survey, and a richer picture would be painted following qualitative interviews. There was also a subconscious bias towards believing that a PDP containing documented goals would lead to improved individual and organisation performance; However, the discussion has identified the concept of subconscious priming which implies that verbal goals may be equally valid, and further comparative research between verbal and written goals is recommended.

Practical implications

The results indicate the potential value that using PDPs could bring to an organisation as an alternative to annual appraisal, subject to a supportive organisational culture.

Originality/value

PricewaterhouseCoopers, in a recent article for CIPD (2015), reported that two-thirds of large companies are planning to rethink their annual appraisal system. One of the key drivers for this was the desire for more regular feedback. Given the recent shift in thinking, little research has been conducted into what would replace the annual appraisal. This paper therefore focusses on the extent to which PDPs can contribute to supporting this more regular contact and feedback.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Steven H. Appelbaum, Heather Ayre and Barbara T. Shapiro

Examines career management, development and performance as proposed in the career management research by Noe, which was defined for studying individual career management…

Abstract

Examines career management, development and performance as proposed in the career management research by Noe, which was defined for studying individual career management. Reviews the organizational career management program and the outcomes of organizational development and performance. Applies the Noe model to measure outcomes and determine if there is a direct relationship between career management programs, performance and development. The study involved three different organizations in the IT sector and HRPs as the respondents. A questionnaire was developed using Burack’s career management audit, and selected measures from various sources for development and performance. The results do not prove that the relationships exist. However, recommendations for future study involve performance as a precursor to career management and development. Recommendations for organizations include a review of career paths, development moves, retirement planning, and a research oriented human resources database.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Maurice Atkinson

The purpose of this paper is to define corporate performance management, provide an overview of the Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority's performance management

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define corporate performance management, provide an overview of the Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority's performance management framework (PMF) and explain how the PMF might be used to enhance organisational effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a case study.

Findings

This paper describes the performance management framework developed by the Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority in Northern Ireland, and identifies how such a framework may be proactively used to enhance organisational effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to the analysis of the development and use of a performance management framework within a single organisation.

Originality/value

This paper has contributed to the debate on performance management by outlining a mechanism by which a performance management framework can be utilised in practice to fundamentally challenge the organisation and provide a platform for action and improvement.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Mahsood Shah and Chenicheri Sid Nair

The higher education sector in many countries is going through unprecedented changes. The changes are as a direct result of external and internal operating environments…

Abstract

Purpose

The higher education sector in many countries is going through unprecedented changes. The changes are as a direct result of external and internal operating environments which are having a significant impact on universities. Externally, changing government policy; ongoing student growth and stakeholder demand for quality; and international developments in higher education are some of the many factors driving change in universities. Internally, change in leadership and renewed institutional strategy; and financial sustainability are some of the internal factors contributing to the changes within universities. The purpose of this paper is to outline the changing context of Australian higher education and argue the need for the renewed emphasis on strategy development and effective implementation in universities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the recurring themes related to strategy development, implementation and reviews from the external quality audits of all Australian universities in cycle one audit and 29 universities who completed cycle two audit until 2011.

Findings

The paper argues the need for universities to engage in careful strategy development and implementation which aligns with institutional resourcing and risk management. Failure to engage in careful strategy development and effective implementation may put universities at risk in the current higher education landscape characterised by changing government policy and the political landscape in Australia.

Originality/value

The literature on the effectiveness of strategy development and implementation in universities is limited. This paper attempts to fill the current gap by arguing the need for institutions to engage in careful strategy development at a time when governments cannot be trusted in the funding of universities.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Gordon Wills

Posits that every enterprise must institutionalize its workplacelearning systems and opportunities in such a way that it radiates whatit has already achieved and from this…

Abstract

Posits that every enterprise must institutionalize its workplace learning systems and opportunities in such a way that it radiates what it has already achieved and from this moves on to realize its full potential – in short, the enterprise itself is the key. Examines in successive chapters: the individual manager and questioning insights (Q); the major systems which the enterprise uses to capture and structure its learning; a SWOT analysis of the enterprise′s total learning; action learning, its contribution to the achievement of enterprise growth, and the role of programmed knowledge (P); the Enterprise School of Management (ESM) as a phoenix of enlightenment and effectiveness rising from the ashes of traditional, less effective management training initiatives; and, finally, the practical realization of the action learning dream, as evidenced by emerging examples of successful and profitable implementation worldwide. Concludes with a selection of pertinent abstracts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Jacqueline A. Blackmore

To provide a best practice framework for peer review via teaching observation as a method of appraising teaching performance within UK higher education (HE) institutions.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a best practice framework for peer review via teaching observation as a method of appraising teaching performance within UK higher education (HE) institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses secondary data analysis via the current literature on peer review and peer appraisal, as well as use of primary data obtained via the design, implementation and analysis of semi‐structured interviews with management and teaching staff within the Faculty of Business and Management Science within a fictitiously named Riverbank University.

Findings

Provides a best practice framework for peer review based on the literature, where the case study university benchmarks well against the framework and an insight into the perceptions of teaching staff on the scheme.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of 40 teaching staff was from only one faculty, in one university. Before generalising the findings it would be prudent to widen the research to include a larger sample from more universities across the HE sector in the UK.

Practical implications

The research has massive implications for the UK HE sector if peer review is to be used as a method of assessing teaching performance.

Originality/value

The paper is valuable as a guide to senior management wishing to implement a peer observation scheme within their own institution.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Meaghan Stovel and Nick Bontis

The onset of the knowledge era has affected all industries. Without exception, the Canadian financial services industry has transformed itself due to the…

Abstract

The onset of the knowledge era has affected all industries. Without exception, the Canadian financial services industry has transformed itself due to the knowledge‐intensive structure it possesses. However, high competition and career‐minded professionals have created a situation in which leading financial services firms are losing key human capital each day – capital that can and will be used against them in the modern, fast‐paced labour market. In the fight for the brightest senior executives, portfolio managers and fund administrators, human resource professionals must pay attention to the investments they are making in their employees through training and development, while monitoring reward and recognition programs, so that loss of intellectual capital is kept to a minimum. This study examines 19 Canadian financial service firms and their current human capital practices. Results show that while human resource managers are effectively managing the people in their organizations through training and development, performance reviews, and the effective management of fluctuating workforce demands. However, this study highlights the need for greater attention to be paid to the leveraging of human capital that exists within their knowledge‐intensive workforce. Furthermore, research findings strongly suggest the need to increase knowledge management behaviours such as the valuation and codification of organizational knowledge assets.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1974

David Ashton and Peter Taylor

Appraisal plays a critical part in the development of management resources in any organisation. From the standpoint of the boss‐subordinate relationship, the performance

Abstract

Appraisal plays a critical part in the development of management resources in any organisation. From the standpoint of the boss‐subordinate relationship, the performance areas examined, the quality of any feedback and the way in which information is used—all these factors can directly affect the current and future performance of the individual manager who is being appraised. From the view of the overall management development role, attitudes to appraisal and the quality of information generated are key constraints upon the possible contribution of management development to organisational effectiveness. During 1973 and 1974, a research team from Durham University Business School surveyed management development and training practices in 30 British organisations, of various sizes and in a wide range of industries. As a part of this project, which involved interviewing senior line and specialist managers in these organisations, appraisal practices were examined—particularly in terms of their contribution to management development in these organisations. This article presents some of the findings and the authors' comments on these.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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