Search results

1 – 10 of over 19000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Riikka Aro and Terhi-Anna Wilska

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the material conditions of peoples’ daily lives by investigating changes in the self-perceived necessities of ten technology- and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the material conditions of peoples’ daily lives by investigating changes in the self-perceived necessities of ten technology- and leisure-related consumer goods and services between 1999 and 2009. The authors also look at the socio-demographic predictors of the perceptions and the development of the ownership of the goods under investigation.

Design/methodology/approach

The data are derived from surveys “Finland – Consumption and way of life” 1999 (N=2,417), 2004 (N=3,574), and 2009 (N=1,202). The statistical analysis methods include ANOVA and descriptive statistics. Also official statistics are used.

Findings

Many technological goods, in particular, have become necessities for most people, and the ownership rates have increased notably. Age, type of household, place of residence and gender affected the necessity of most items. Income affected the necessity of expensive goods and services.

Practical implications

The ways goods become social decencies does not always follow economic rationalities or are explained by conventional socio-economic determinants. The meaning of life course stage and related daily practices are probably more important than is usually recognized in social studies. Particularly many ICT goods become socially perceived necessities soon after their emergence, which changes the perceptions of adequate living standards, affecting thus the definition of “basic needs” and related social policy.

Originality/value

The perceptions of necessities and other measures of living standards have been mainly looked at from the viewpoint of poverty and income. This study explains the perceived necessity of goods and services by several socio-demographic variables.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 34 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Younghee Noh

To propose correct metadata elements, it was deemed necessary to close the gap between the perception of metadata creators and data creators through a user behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

To propose correct metadata elements, it was deemed necessary to close the gap between the perception of metadata creators and data creators through a user behavior analysis. This study aims to improve metadata elements of web‐based reference resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed three types of surveys: behavior analysis of metadata creators, perception analysis of users, and system satisfaction. For analysis of metadata creators, the study examined data fields where metadata were recorded among metadata elements of reference resources. For user awareness analysis, respondents were asked to answer the necessity of 17 elements after they actually had entered data and to recommend other necessary elements. Finally, system satisfaction survey was followed.

Findings

As a result, first, it was found that the respondents recognized five elements: contributor, source, data, format, and relation as necessary input elements, which in practice had not been well recorded in real operating systems. The usability test also found that users entered the five elements more than other elements. Second, the first survey experience did not impact the second survey response. It was found that previous experience of system use had significantly impacted respondents' recognition of necessary metadata elements. It was also found that data input rate in the data input test had a significant influence on the change in the perception regarding necessary metadata. Third, the most chosen elements when searching for reference resources were found to be title, subject, description, and creator, in order of frequency. Fourth, respondents were surveyed on their satisfaction regarding nine questions after they had used a system (factor analysis). In this analysis, it was found that the users' satisfaction was relatively high in system usefulness, ease of system use, ease of understanding information, and sufficiency of metadata elements.

Originality/value

Since the 1990s, studies on the development of metadata elements for web‐based reference resources have been made and applied to the real world. Ever since, many reference resources web sites have been developed. However, it was found that no standard metadata format was built for web‐based reference resources and each website provided its own item to the minimal degree. The result of this study can provide a standardized and more consistent service for web‐based resource.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Aron Perenyi, Roxanne Zolin and Alex Maritz

Why is self-employment an attractive option for certain seniors and what drives seniors into business start-ups? In this study, the motivations and preferences of senior…

Abstract

Purpose

Why is self-employment an attractive option for certain seniors and what drives seniors into business start-ups? In this study, the motivations and preferences of senior entrepreneurs in Australia, to become self-employed, by means of business start-ups, are explored. The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical basis for policy implications.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods study is conducted. Members of the National Senior’s Association in Australia were interviewed and surveyed. The semi-structured interviews identified the key factors influencing senior entrepreneurs in relation to self-employment and entrepreneurial choices at a later career stage. The survey collected information on intentionality, motivation, skills, opportunities, success, satisfaction, participation, barriers, benefits, education and training, and perceptions of policy support for senior entrepreneurs.

Findings

Respondents gave an account of the prevalence of pull factors motivating their choice of an entrepreneurial career. Multivariate statistical analysis of survey responses showed that senior entrepreneurs are more driven by opportunity than necessity and are primarily internally motivated.

Research limitations/implications

Results of this study suggest a weak link between motivation by others and the act of start-up, but this may also imply that those seniors who are more likely to become entrepreneurs are more likely to ignore the impulses from their social context. This requires further investigation to ensure a robust identification of drivers and an elimination of contextual effects. Further research is suggested to compose a relevant model structure in different contexts and a representative sample to confirm the model outcomes.

Originality/value

This is the first mixed methods study of the antecedents of senior entrepreneurs’ start-up intentions in Australia. The study also uses entrepreneurial activity as opposed to intention as its dependent variable, which allows for a more accurate evaluation of antecedents to the senior entrepreneurship phenomenon.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurship for Deprived Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-988-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Satoshi Sugahara and Kim Watty

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the overall perceptions of accounting academics from Japan and Australia about global convergence of accounting education; and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the overall perceptions of accounting academics from Japan and Australia about global convergence of accounting education; and their beliefs about the contextual factors affecting the goal of global convergence.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of this research was collected via a questionnaire-based survey of accounting academics who were teaching at the undergraduate and postgraduate level in tertiary institutes in Japan and Australia. This study adapted the questionnaire originally used by Sugahara (2013) to extend the survey of accounting academics in Japan, to accounting academics in Australia. The questionnaire administered in this research asked their overall perceptions regarding the convergence of accounting education and associated contextual factors.

Findings

Findings reveal some similarities and differences across contextual factors that influence academic perceptions about global convergence. Further the authors identify a link between academic position and respondent views of global convergence.

Originality/value

The findings of this cross-country study provide insights for the International Accounting Education Standards Boards (IAESB) about the views of a key stakeholder group, accounting academics. Further the authors recommend the development of a communications strategy that targets accounting academics, and better explains the work of the IAESB and the intended value of global convergence using IES.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

William E. Hauck and Nancy Stanforth

This research aims to investigate differences between cohorts and perceptions of luxury goods and services.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate differences between cohorts and perceptions of luxury goods and services.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey asked participants to rate goods to determine their perceptions of luxury. Participants also provided information concerning elasticity and motivations for purchasing goods and services. A total of 347 participants in three age groups completed the questionnaire.

Findings

The study shows that there are significant differences between cohort groups in their perceptions of luxury goods and services, especially between the oldest and youngest cohorts. The elasticity measures showed that for all three cohorts, certain goods and services were inelastic and, therefore, were considered not to be luxury goods. The reasons why people buy goods they do not need varied between cohorts.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the study may not be generalizable to other groups of consumers because it was a convenience sample.

Practical implications

The results of this study show that marketers need to tailor messages to individual cohort groups. Consumers' experiences at their “coming of age” do influence perceptions of luxury. There are different motivations for buying among the cohort groups. Identifying and leveraging these motivators in marketing communication will help to target these groups with appropriate messages. Marketers need to understand those motivations and develop communication campaigns that target those groups.

Originality/value

Little research has focused on the cohort perception of luxury. Although there is evidence to suggest there will be differences between age groups, this study seeks to investigate those differences to help marketers to tailor their messages more effectively.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Hala M. G. Amin and Ehab K. A. Mohamed

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of auditors in Egypt toward the role that continuous auditing (CA) can play in offsetting the challenges facing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions of auditors in Egypt toward the role that continuous auditing (CA) can play in offsetting the challenges facing the quality of Internet-reported financial information. The paper also examines the impact of audit firm type and years of experience on these perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Ninety-six auditors working in the Big 4 and large local audit firms are surveyed to attain their perceptions on the issues examined. Chi-square, Mann–Whitney and t-test are used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The overall results indicate that the majority of auditors in Egypt agree that implementing CA can offset the challenges associated with the Internet financial reporting (IFR) environment. The results also reveal that there are significant differences between auditors working in Big 4 audit firms and those working in local firms regarding the perceptions of the effect of CA on some aspects of the timeliness of information.

Research limitations/implications

The paper extends the stream of research on both CA and IFR that confirms that the widespread use of the Internet in disclosing financial information continues to be a worrisome problem for auditing firms.

Practical implications

The paper provides insights into the challenges facing auditing in the IFR environment and how implementing CA can help offset these challenges.

Originality/value

To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first to examine issues related to CA in the IFR environment in the Middle East and, in particular, Egypt.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Elspeth McFadzean, Jean‐Noel Ezingeard and David Birchall

Information security is becoming increasingly more important as organisations are endangered by a variety of threats from both its internal and external environments. Many…

Abstract

Purpose

Information security is becoming increasingly more important as organisations are endangered by a variety of threats from both its internal and external environments. Many theorists now advocate that effective security policies should be created at senior management level. This is because executives are able to evaluate the organisation using a holistic approach as well as having the power to ensure that new systems and procedures are implemented in a timely manner. There is, however, a continuing lack of understanding regarding the strategic importance of managing information security. In addition, there is a gap in the literature on the relationship between directors and information security strategy. This paper attempts to close this gap by exploring how directors perceive their organisation's security and what factors influence their decisions on the development and implementation of information security strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on constructivist grounded theory. Forty‐three interviews were conducted at executive level in 29 organisations. These interviews were then coded and analysed in order to develop new theory on directors' perception of risk and its effect on the development and implementation of information security strategy.

Findings

The analysis shows that senior managers' engagement with information security is dependent on two key variables: the strategic importance of information systems to their organisation and their perception of risk. Additionally, this research found that these two variables are affected by both organisational contextual factors and the strategic and operational actions undertaken within the business. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that the two board variables also have an impact on the organisation's environment as well as its strategic and operational actions. This paper uses the data gathered from the interviews to develop a model of these factors. In addition, a perception grid is constructed which illustrates the potential concerns that can drive board engagement.

Practical implications

The paper illustrates the advantages of using the perception grid to understand and develop current and future information security issues.

Originality/value

The paper investigates how organisational directors perceive information security and how this perception influences the development of their information security strategy.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Robert Jones, Guenter Arndt and Richard Kustin

Utilizes a survey of 272 Australian ISO 9002 quality certified companies to examine two issues: first, the relationship between a company’s initial motivation for seeking…

Abstract

Utilizes a survey of 272 Australian ISO 9002 quality certified companies to examine two issues: first, the relationship between a company’s initial motivation for seeking certification (QCert) and its perception of the benefits it has received; and, second, the impact of time on perceptions of benefits received. Companies which sought QCert because of an externally‐imposed perception of the necessity to “obtain a certificate” were found to experience fewer beneficial outcomes of QCert, in comparison with companies which sought QCert because of an internally‐driven desire to improve organizational performance. Additionally, no evidence was found that longer‐certified companies experience more benefits than recently‐certified companies, regardless of the initial motivation for seeking QCert. Cautions against the drive towards “forcing” companies to seek QCert as a result of a perception of an external threat. Such a process appears to be counterproductive.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Shih‐Jui Tung, Ching‐Chun Shih, Sherrie Wei and Yu‐Hua Chen

This study aims to examine the attitudinal inconsistency among Taiwanese consumers toward organic agriculture/food, and its relationship to their willingness to pay a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the attitudinal inconsistency among Taiwanese consumers toward organic agriculture/food, and its relationship to their willingness to pay a premium and purchase for organic product.

Design/methodology/approach

A telephone survey consisting of 913 households was made to reach an estimated 3.3 percent sampling error with 95 percent confidence level.

Findings

It was found that those who were female, who had higher occupation prestige, who had college education levels, who were aged in their 40s, and who possessed an optimistic opinion toward the necessity of organic farming tend to pay a premium for and buy organic food. The majority of Taiwanese respondents showed a high level of concern about pesticides but a low trust in organic food, which revealed an attitudinal inconsistency toward organic agriculture/food. A multiple discriminant analysis with a moderating variable shows that consumers' trust in organic food and their pesticide concern jointly explain the respondents' willingness to pay a premium and purchasing behavior. The influence of consumers' pesticide concern on their willingness to pay a premium and purchase actually depends on their levels of trust.

Originality/value

As a whole, lack of trust and confusing organic product certification levels is the main barrier to Taiwan's organic agriculture development. Further communication and policy modification is needed to reinforce consumers' confidence in organic agriculture/food.

1 – 10 of over 19000