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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Asad Shafiq, P. Fraser Johnson, Robert D. Klassen and Amrou Awaysheh

Firms are increasingly being pressured by the public, regulators and customers to ensure that their suppliers behave in a socially and ecologically sound manner. Yet, the…

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2097

Abstract

Purpose

Firms are increasingly being pressured by the public, regulators and customers to ensure that their suppliers behave in a socially and ecologically sound manner. Yet, the complexity and risks embedded in many supply chains makes this challenging, with monitoring practices offering one means to attenuate supply sustainability risk. Drawing on agency theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between sustainability and operations risk, supplier sustainability monitoring practices, supply improvement initiatives and firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses data from a survey and archival sources from a sample of large US firms to empirically examine the relationship between sustainability and operations risk, supplier sustainability monitoring practices, supply improvement initiatives and firm performance.

Findings

Findings indicate that higher levels of perceived sustainability risk is related to greater monitoring of supplier sustainability practices by focal firms. Perceptions of higher operations risk are indirectly related to greater social monitoring through investment in supply improvement initiatives. Monitoring of supplier sustainability practices is also found to have a positive effect on focal firm performance.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that managers process operations risks and sustainability risks independently. Greater sustainability risk leads to increased sustainability monitoring, while greater operations risk leads to increased investment in supply improvement initiatives, which in turn leads to increased social monitoring. The research also indicates that behavior-oriented approaches, such as monitoring of supplier environmental and social practices, are an effective approach to improving firm sustainability performance. However, due to resource constraints, a challenge for supply chain managers is where and when to invest in behavior-oriented approaches for suppliers.

Originality/value

This research advances supply risk literature by exploring the effects of supply sustainability risk on the use of monitoring practices to manage supplier environmental and social behavior. Using a combination of survey and archival data to independently assess the implications of sustainability monitoring practices on firm sustainability performance, this study provides a methodology for evaluating the impact of sustainability monitoring practices on the triple bottom line in supply chain management.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2019

Amjad A. Abu-Elsamen, Mamoun N. Akroush, Nermeen A. Asfour and Hana Al Jabali

This paper aims to examine contextual factors affecting intention to purchase energy-saving products (ESPs), via a research model integrating environmental awareness…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine contextual factors affecting intention to purchase energy-saving products (ESPs), via a research model integrating environmental awareness, perceived performance risk and perceived financial risk with the theory of reasoned action (TRA).

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 474 targeted Jordanian householders completed a structured survey, providing data for exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and for structural path analysis to test the research model and hypotheses.

Findings

Attitude most strongly predicts purchase intention. Environmental awareness positively influences subjective norms and reduces perceived performance and financial risks, which are related to purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This research examines perceived performance and financial risks. Others including social and physical risks have research potential. Future research on international marketing strategy and cross-cultural consumer behavior could compare Jordan with its oil-producing neighbors.

Practical implications

Environmental awareness affects ESP purchase intention. Marketing strategy should focus on reducing perceived functional and financial risks while enhancing subjective norms by encouraging positive word of mouth.

Social implications

The findings enhance environmental sustainability by indicating ways of reducing energy consumption and increasing the usage of environmentally friendly products. The study addresses behavioral and social aspects of green products, whereas most ESP suppliers focus on technology.

Originality/value

The study’s major theoretical contribution is incorporating perceived risk and environmental awareness into the TRA to better understand intention to purchase ESPs. Empirically, it conceptualizes and tests an integrated model of determinants of attitudes and intentions with new insights from an emerging market.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2022

Agung Sutrisno and Vikas Kumar

This study proposes a new model for assessing supply chain sustainability risk integrating subjectivity and objectivity of decision-maker. Research has shown the vacancy…

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes a new model for assessing supply chain sustainability risk integrating subjectivity and objectivity of decision-maker. Research has shown the vacancy of study in dealing with the above issue. To fill this research gap, a new decision support model considering the subjectivity and objectivity of decision-makers in assigning the weight of the supply chain risk reprioritization criteria is presented and demonstrated using a case example.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a new decision support model for assessing supply chain sustainability risk based on additional failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) parameters and its integration with preference selection index (PSI) methodology and the Shannon entropy. A case example of the supply chain small and medium enterprise (SME) producing handy crafts has been used in this study.

Findings

The result of the study reveals critical sustainability risk dimensions and their risk elements demanding management attention to support realization to a more sustainable business operation.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a single case study is often associated as a limitation in the research studies, and this study is based on findings from SMEs in the handy craft sector in a developing country. Nonetheless, future studies may focus on replicating this study using more samples. This preliminary study provides academics and practitioners with an exemplar of supply chain sustainability risk assessment from the SME in a developing country.

Practical implications

The result of this study is beneficial for practitioners, particularly owner-managers of SMEs who can use this study as guidance on how to identify and select the critical sustainability risks and plan mitigating strategies accordingly.

Originality/value

Scientific effort on appraising criticality of supply chain sustainability risks considering subjectivity and objectivity of decision-maker simultaneously is missing in earlier studies. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first paper applying the PSI and Shannon entropy method and using it for evaluating the impact of supply chain risk based on five sustainability pillars. The findings and suggestions for future research initiatives will provide new insights for scholars and practitioners in managing SME supply chain sustainability risks.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2018

Jan Meinlschmidt, Martin C. Schleper and Kai Foerstl

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how buying firms manage their lower tier sustainability management (LTSM) in their supply networks and what contextual factors…

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1661

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how buying firms manage their lower tier sustainability management (LTSM) in their supply networks and what contextual factors influence the choice of approaches. As most of the environmental and social burden is caused in lower tiers, the authors use the iceberg analogy.

Design/methodology/approach

Findings from 12 case studies and 53 interviews, publicly available and internal firm data are presented. In an abductive research approach, transaction cost economics (TCE) conceptually guides the analytical iteration processes between theory and data.

Findings

This study provides eight LTSM approaches grouped into three categories: direct (holistic, product-, region-, and event-specific) indirect (multiplier-, alliance- and compliance-based) and neglect (tier-1-based). Focal firms choose between these approaches depending on the strength of observed contextual factors (stakeholder salience, structural supply network complexity, product and industry salience, past supply network incidents, socio-economic and cultural distance and lower tier supplier dependency), leading to perceived sustainability risk (PSR).

Research limitations/implications

By depicting TCE’s theoretical boundaries in predicting LTSM governance modes, the theory is elevated to the supply network level of analysis. Future research should investigate LTSM at the purchasing category level of analysis to compare and contrast PSR profiles for different purchase tasks and to validate and extend the framework.

Practical implications

This study serves as a blueprint for the development of firms’ LTSM capabilities that suit their unique PSR profiles. It offers knowledge regarding what factors influence these profiles and presents a model that links the effectiveness of different LTSM approaches to resource intensity.

Originality/value

This study extends the application of TCE and adds empirically to the literature on multi-tier and sustainable supply chain management.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2020

Leila Alinaghian, Jilin Qiu and Kamran Razmdoost

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review and assess the current status of research on supply chain sustainability from a network structural perspective and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review and assess the current status of research on supply chain sustainability from a network structural perspective and provide an organising framework for future scholarship in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

By adopting an evidence-based approach, this study conducts a systematic review of 73 articles from 18 peer-reviewed journals published between 2000 and 2020.

Findings

Adopting a social network analysis approach, the review identifies specific node-level (i.e. degree centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality) and network-level (i.e. network density, network sub-groups and network diversity) structural properties that play a role in supply chain sustainability. The results reveal that structural properties determine the extent of perception of sustainability risks, the diffusion of sustainability targets, introduction of sustainable innovations, development of sustainability capabilities, adoption of sustainability initiatives and the monitoring of sustainability performance throughout the supply chain.

Originality/value

By distinguishing between supply network and sustainable supply network types, this study extends the existing understandings of the role of network connectivity patterns in supply chain sustainability through synthesising and evaluating the extant literature. This study further clarifies the role of these network structural properties in supply chain sustainability by describing their impact on a set of sustainable supply chain management practices through which firms achieve sustainability goals across their supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Anis Daghar, Leila Alinaghian and Neil Turner

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review, synthesize and critically evaluate the current research status on the role of collaborative interorganizational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically review, synthesize and critically evaluate the current research status on the role of collaborative interorganizational relationships (CIRs) in supply chain risks (SCRs) from a social capital perspective and provide an organizing lens for future scholarship in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a systematic literature review approach to investigate 126 articles from 27 peer-reviewed journals between 1995 and 2020.

Findings

This paper investigates supply chain CIRs using a social capital perspective to explain the role of structural, relational and cognitive capital that resides in these relationships in various SCRs (i.e. environmental, supply, manufacturing, demand, information, financial and transportation). The review reveals that the three social capital dimensions uniquely and both positively and negatively affect different SCRs. The findings further suggest that the perceived SCRs can influence the structural and relational capital.

Practical implications

This study calls for practitioners to consider the cognitive alignment with their supply network partners, their relational investments, as well as the interorganizational processes and systems in managing and alleviating SCRs.

Originality/value

This review offers a theoretical articulation of how various aspects of CIRs affect SCRs. Specifically, this study extends the existing understanding of the role of social capital in SCRs through offering a synthesis of dominant findings and discourses, and avenues for future research.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2021

Chee Kwong Lau and Hexin Chen

This study examines the stakeholder perception of the sustainability risks, challenges and benefits arising from managing these risks in the Singapore construction industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the stakeholder perception of the sustainability risks, challenges and benefits arising from managing these risks in the Singapore construction industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire consisting of 89 risk factors, challenges and benefits, was administered, with 216 responses received from various stakeholders. Regression analyses were used to estimate the relationships between sustainability and business risk factors, challenges and benefits associated with business sustainability practices.

Findings

Stakeholders recognise the importance of the emerging sustainability risk factors, and indeed rank these almost on a par with conventional business risk factors. The inherent business risks determine the nature of sustainability risk factors for construction firms, which in turn can affect their business risks and the performance and value creation of firms. However, most stakeholders, while acknowledging that business sustainability practices can provide benefits as well as posing challenges, do not believe that they can derive net benefits from such practices.

Research limitations/implications

Through this perception study, there is an urgent need to turn the existing awareness of the importance of business sustainability (BS) practices into more consistent and solid actions among construction firms in Singapore.

Practical implications

This study’s results imply construction firms to incorporate BS practices more systematically into their business strategies and operations, and to include sustainability risk factors alongside conventional business risks in their risk registers and risk management frameworks.

Originality/value

This study consolidates various variables and constructs of BS matters in the literature and practice into a meaningful framework for the management of BS in the construction industry.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

K. Vasileiou and J. Morris

In the context of increased interest in the sustainability of food supply chains, this paper aims to assess perceptions of the relative importance of economic, social and…

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5372

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of increased interest in the sustainability of food supply chains, this paper aims to assess perceptions of the relative importance of economic, social and environmental factors as they influence decision making by growers, merchants and retailers, using fresh potatoes in Britain as a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

Following exploratory interviews with key informants, a two‐staged survey of 240 potato growers, 17 potato merchants, and four retailers was carried out to assess perceptions of sustainability. Data analysis used a range of non‐parametric statistical methods.

Findings

Economic and related market factors associated with staying in business and maintaining competitive advantage were the dominant concern for all supply chain participants. Greater importance, however, is now given to social and environmental factors both as influences on decision making and as indicators of business performance. The social capital of the supply chain, as it describes relationships amongst participants, is an important moderator of business uncertainty. Environmental performance, measured in terms of the use of natural resources and the risk of pollution, is driven by a mix of compliance requirements and perceived market drivers.

Research limitations/implications

This research design was constrained by limited access to objective verifiable quantitative data, in part due to commercial confidentiality.

Practical implications

This paper confirms the relevance of sustainability criteria to measure and report supply chain performance.

Originality/value

This paper measures perceptions of sustainability as it affects business decisions in the supply chain. It confirms the need for a set of objectively verifiable indicators to guide and report supply chain performance.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Anna Maija Vuorio, Kaisu Puumalainen and Katharina Fellnhofer

The role of entrepreneurship has changed to include issues beyond economic growth. This has turned attention toward the drivers of entrepreneurial intentions across…

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7344

Abstract

Purpose

The role of entrepreneurship has changed to include issues beyond economic growth. This has turned attention toward the drivers of entrepreneurial intentions across entrepreneurship types, particularly in sustainable entrepreneurship. The purpose of this paper is to examine the drivers of entrepreneurial intentions in sustainable entrepreneurship. In particular, the paper aims to extend the existing intention models to include work values and attitudes toward sustainability, thereby bringing the model into the context of sustainable entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quantitative research design, data were collected in three European countries through anonymous questionnaires. The data consist of responses from 393 university students.

Findings

The results show that attitude toward sustainability and perceived entrepreneurial desirability enhance sustainability-oriented entrepreneurial intentions. Moreover, adding sustainability into the regression equation adds explanation power, hence suggesting that the theory of planned behavior needs to be adapted when applied to sustainable entrepreneurship. Attitudes toward sustainability are positively impacted by altruism, while perceived entrepreneurial desirability is driven by intrinsic and extrinsic rewards.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on one particular type of entrepreneurship and one particular age group.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the entrepreneurship literature by applying the entrepreneurial intention model to sustainable entrepreneurship. The results imply that it may be the time to consider the variance in entrepreneurial opportunities in intention models as well as the need to address the conflict between work values. The results show that sustainability-oriented entrepreneurial intentions are driven by attitudes toward sustainability and perceived entrepreneurial desirability. These two attitudes are driven by altruism and extrinsic rewards, and, especially, extrinsic reward plays an opposite role in both drivers of sustainability-oriented entrepreneurial intentions.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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