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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Niels Peter Mols, Per Nikolaj D. Bukh and Jørn Flohr Nielsen

Outlines the adaptation process in the distribution channel structure of the retail banking sector as a consequence of the introduction of electronic channels, such as…

Abstract

Outlines the adaptation process in the distribution channel structure of the retail banking sector as a consequence of the introduction of electronic channels, such as telephone banking, PC banking and Internet banking. Based on responses from 42 retail banks in Denmark, their distribution channel strategies are described and their relation to selected marketing mix elements is examined. Most Danish retail banks attach decisive importance to offering a customer‐friendly PC bank service, whereas fewer of them attach the same importance to telephone, Internet and branch banking. A multiple channel strategy combining several channels is the most popular.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Jørn Flohr Nielsen, Per Nikolaj D. Bukh and Niels Peter Mols

In the retail financial sector competitive pressure seems to challenge traditional management accounting systems, which often do not allow the identification of profitable…

Abstract

In the retail financial sector competitive pressure seems to challenge traditional management accounting systems, which often do not allow the identification of profitable customer relationships. Drawing on a stage model and data from management accountants, branch managers and frontline employees in Danish financial service companies, this article investigates barriers to the implementation of customer‐oriented management accounting. The article documents how financial institutions are increasingly integrating management accounting systems with customer‐related activities thus enabling customer profitability analyses. However, several barriers related to organization structure, resources and attitudes hamper further customer‐oriented changes. Data gathered at the branch level strongly indicate problems of ownership and project sponsoring, and it is argued that new accounting systems may be less important to customer orientation than empowerment and goal‐oriented participation of the frontline employees.

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International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Niels Peter Mols, Per Nikolaj D. Bukh and Per Blenker

Provides evidence of the criteria for the choice of domestic cash management banks adopted by large European firms. A questionnaire completed by 1,129 corporate customers…

Abstract

Provides evidence of the criteria for the choice of domestic cash management banks adopted by large European firms. A questionnaire completed by 1,129 corporate customers from 20 European countries indicates that service quality is the most important criterion for choice of domestic cash management banking, followed by pricing and relationship. Using the empirical findings, discusses the appropriateness of relationship‐oriented and transaction‐oriented bank strategies across Europe. Based on the customers’ ranking of choice criteria finds no evidence of widespread successful implementation of relationship banking in Europe.

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International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Per Nikolaj Bukh and Anne Kirstine Svanholt

This paper examines how a public sector organization combined management control systems (MCS) to comply with increased uncertainty and conflicting objectives of tight…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines how a public sector organization combined management control systems (MCS) to comply with increased uncertainty and conflicting objectives of tight budget control, flexibility, and quality care simultaneously. It also analyzes how middle managers interpret management control intentions and manage conflicting objectives, and how locally developed MCS are coupled with top management goals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a case-study approach, based on interviews with top and middle managements, as well as document studies conducted at a medium-sized Danish municipality.

Findings

Both constraining and enabling control systems empower middle managers and facilitate tight budget controls. Furthermore, middle managers play a crucial role in the use of MCS, develop local control systems, adjust existing control systems and influence the decisions and strategies of top management.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is context-specific, and the role of accounting in professional work varies due to the specific techniques involved.

Practical implications

This paper shows how MCS, including budgeting and planning systems, can be applied in social services to help middle managements obtain tight budget controls while also improving service quality.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the limited extant research on the role of middle management in a control framework and demonstrates how MCS can balance conflicting goals in social services when uncertainty increases. Furthermore, this paper shows how the vertical coupling of MCS is tight when budgeting is employed for planning purposes.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Gregory White, Alina Lee, Yuni Yuningsih, Christian Nielsen and Per Nikolaj Bukh

The purpose of this research project is to compare the nature and extent of voluntary intellectual capital disclosures (ICD) by UK and Australian biotechnology companies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research project is to compare the nature and extent of voluntary intellectual capital disclosures (ICD) by UK and Australian biotechnology companies. The motivating research question was whether the nature and extent of voluntary ICD by preparers of financial report data in these countries reflected the relative maturity of the UK, compared to Australian industry.

Design/methodology/approach

ICD was measured in annual reports and financial statements published on the company websites. A Danish disclosure index was used to evaluate voluntary disclosures by 156 companies about customers, employees, IT, strategy, R&D and processes (78‐items scored for each company).

Findings

A significant leverage effect was demonstrated in relation to the “nature” of ICD by UK and Australian biotechnology companies. Interestingly, mean customer ICD were higher in annual reports from high‐leveraged compared to low‐leveraged Australian firms. In contrast, UK firms showed higher mean R&D ICD for low‐leveraged firms than high‐leveraged firms. With regards to the “extent” of ICD measured, the study demonstrated a significant country effect.

Research limitations/implications

Potential limitations or bias may exist from the use of the disclosure index: binary scoring of disclosure versus non‐disclosure reduces the richness of data otherwise obtainable by limited case study or interviews; and data collection is limiting – narrative with managers actually preparing ICD is not possible.

Practical implications

Australian company financial accountants and managers preparing and/or including ICD information could be in danger of underestimating the importance of information asymmetry existing with lenders.

Originality/value

This finding contrasts the legitimate R&D focused ICD of low‐leveraged UK firms; namely to attract stakeholder attention to their expanding intellectual property base, with the findings from Australian firms' with a relatively predictable and naïve customer focus.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Per Nikolaj Bukh, Karina Skovvang Christensen and Anne Kirstine Svanholt

This paper aims to explore how the introduction of new accounting information influences the understandings of cost-consciousness. Furthermore, the paper explores how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how the introduction of new accounting information influences the understandings of cost-consciousness. Furthermore, the paper explores how managers use accounting information to shape organizational members’ understanding of changes, and how focusing on cost-consciousness influence professional culture within social services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a case study, drawing on sensemaking as a theoretical lens. Top management, middle management and staff specialists at a medium-sized Danish municipality are interviewed.

Findings

The paper demonstrates how accounting metaphors can be effective in linking cost information and cost-consciousness to operational decisions in daily work practices. Further, the study elucidates how professionalism may be strengthened based on the use of accounting information.

Research limitations/implications

The study is context specific, and the role of accounting in professional work varies on the basis of the specific techniques involved.

Practical implications

The paper shows how managers influence how professionals interpret and use accounting information. It shows how cost-consciousness can be integrated with social work practices to improve service quality.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on how accounting information influences social work. To date, only a few papers have focused on how cost-consciousness can be understood in practice and how it influences professional culture. Further, the study expands the limited accounting metaphor research.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Per Nikolaj Bukh

Many firms have started disclosing information on intellectual capital. Financial analysts, however, ask for more disclosure related to strategy and often find…

Abstract

Many firms have started disclosing information on intellectual capital. Financial analysts, however, ask for more disclosure related to strategy and often find intellectual capital statement less relevant. Drawing on results from a study of disclosure of information on intellectual capital in Danish initial public offering (IPO) prospectuses, this commentary argues that the perceived irrelevance of intellectual capital is somewhat paradoxical since intellectual capital reports and recent prospectuses share remarkable similarities with respect to the intellectual capital indicators disclosed. Further, the commentary argues that, for intellectual capital disclosure to be perceived as relevant from a capital market perspective, the information should be disclosed as an integral part of a framework illuminating the value creation processes of the firm. The emerging practice with respect to intellectual capital offers such a framework for disclosing the business model of the knowledge‐based company.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Christian Nielsen, Per Nikolaj Bukh, Jan Mouritsen, Mette Rosenkrands Johansen and Peter Gormsen

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose and illustrate the use of a set of rules to make an analytical reading of the indicators of an intellectual capital…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose and illustrate the use of a set of rules to make an analytical reading of the indicators of an intellectual capital statement possible. Design/methodology/approach – The paper proposes a model to analyze intellectual capital statements and applies this model to an intellectual capital statement and an IPO prospectus, as these two reporting forms are suggested to be similar. Thus, they are analyzed using the same methodology. Findings – The paper demonstrates that it is possible to analyze prospectuses and intellectual capital statements systematically and even to compare companies on that basis. Since IPOs are often already part of the capital market's information, the similarities between reading IPOs and intellectual capital statement suggest that intellectual capital statements convey company‐specific information relevant for financial analysts. Practical implications – The paper presents an analytical model which can be used generally in the analysis of the intellectual capital statement and IPO prospectuses. Originality/value – The paper demonstrates the similarities between an intellectual capital report and an IPO prospectus. Further, the paper demonstrates the use of a theoretically anchored and practical, useful model for analysing disclosure in the narrative part of a financial report.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Per Nikolaj Bukh and Isa Kjærgaard Jensen

The purpose of this paper is to show how three similar utility companies have adopted intellectual capital statements as a management technology, incorporated it into…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how three similar utility companies have adopted intellectual capital statements as a management technology, incorporated it into existing practices, developed and adapted it.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on ethnomethodology using accounts where the data collection was mainly through semi‐structured interviews with practitioners. The analysis is based on the actor network theory where the idea of an intellectual capital statement is enacted and materialised.

Findings

The paper finds that the local context and the local actors have a decisive influence on the network creation taking place around the intellectual capital statement as an object, where the objects create room for different actions. It is concluded that the intellectual capital statement in the companies functions as a conceptual framework where existing initiatives can be integrated into a whole. Further, it is concluded that an actor with a strong position is necessary in order for the intellectual capital statement to be part of the management practice.

Originality/value

Previous studies of intellectual capital reporting have been based on surveys or studies of the written reports and how they at a specific point in time were used in companies. This study is based on the researchers being present in the companies while the intellectual capital statements are developed, and on following the companies for three to four years. Thus, the focus is on the construction of the statements. Further, the methodology opens up new ways of understanding intellectual capital statements.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Per Nikolaj Bukh, Christian Nielsen, Peter Gormsen and Jan Mouritsen

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether information on intellectual capital (non‐financial information on knowledge based resources) is disclosed in Danish IPO…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether information on intellectual capital (non‐financial information on knowledge based resources) is disclosed in Danish IPO prospectuses. Further, to analyse whether this voluntary disclosure has changed in the period from 1999 to 2001 and to analyse what factors can explain the amount of disclosure in the prospectuses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses content analysis to compile a measure of disclosure on each prospectus and statistical analysis to test whether there is an association between disclosure and company type, the existence of managerial ownership before the IPO, the size of the company or the age of the firm.

Findings

Based on statistical analysis, it is concluded that the extent of managerial ownership prior to the IPO and industry type affects the amount of voluntary intellectual capital disclosure, while company size and age do not affect disclosure. The results are interpreted in the light of the increasing importance of disclosing information on value drivers, strategy and intellectual capital to the capital market and constitute a contribution to the ongoing debate on corporate reporting practices.

Practical implications

Since information on intellectual capital is already disclosed in IPO prospectuses this reporting form can be used as inspiration when an intellectual capital report is developed. The results also indicate that companies and their advisers believe that this type of information is important in the capital market's assessment of the company's value. Further, it is suggested that intellectual capital reports should be read in the context of the firm's strategy in the same manner as an prospectus is read.

Originality/value

Very few papers have analysed disclosure in prospectuses and it has been from a different perspective from this paper. Further, this paper analyses a time series of data and demonstrates how the amount of disclosure has developed over the years. Finally, the paper contributes to the body of literature on what factors explain disclosure in general.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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