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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2018

Joel Hietanen, Pekka Mattila, Antti Sihvonen and Henrikki Tikkanen

The purpose of this paper is to continue the emerging stream of literature that has found knockoffs and counterfeits to be unobtrusive or even beneficial to luxury…

1182

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to continue the emerging stream of literature that has found knockoffs and counterfeits to be unobtrusive or even beneficial to luxury companies by analyzing how they produce paradoxes of meaning and contribute to the renewal of luxury markets. This is done by exploring them as doppelgänger brand images that reappropriate brand imagery for their own purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that focuses on the role of knockoffs and counterfeits in the renewal of luxury markets.

Findings

The findings highlight how knockoffs and counterfeits can contribute to the emergence and cyclical diffusion of luxury. As luxury offerings are introduced to the market, knockoffs and counterfeits accelerate the snob effect, aid in anchoring trends and contribute to induced obsolescence. During diffusion, knockoffs and counterfeits can strengthen aspiration, bandwagon and herding effects. In doing so, knockoffs and counterfeits create a paradox as they simultaneously legitimize the idea of the “authenticity” of genuine offerings through their presence in the market and create cyclical demand for novel offerings by undermining the authenticity claims of existing luxury offerings. Thus, knockoffs and counterfeits can be understood as a paradox of luxury markets that contributes to the market cyclicality not despite but because of this paradoxical interplay.

Originality/value

While research on knockoffs and counterfeiting is plentiful in the field of marketing, this is among the few studies that analyze how these offerings contribute to luxury markets and their renewal.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Juho-Petteri Huhtala, Pekka Mattila, Antti Sihvonen and Henrikki Tikkanen

Over the past 50 years, a substantial interest has been put to research on how innovation spreads within social networks over time (see Rogers, 1962, 2010). Our initial…

Abstract

Over the past 50 years, a substantial interest has been put to research on how innovation spreads within social networks over time (see Rogers, 1962, 2010). Our initial aim was to examine innovation diffusion in industrial networks. We operationalized the research through a case study of an advertising network by using systematic combining as the approach (Dubois & Gadde, 2002, 2014). From the initial focus of innovation diffusion, the rematching of data and theory led us to focus on the barriers of innovation diffusion. By doing so, we found out that multilevel strategizing appears to be an important phenomenon in understanding dynamics of innovation diffusion within industrial networks. Specifically, strategizing occurs in two levels: (1) the groups within the network compete for position, and (2) actors within a group compete for position by trying to differentiate themselves from other group actors. A strategic mismatch between the two levels leads the network to become decelerated or even static in diffusing new innovations (Abrahamsen, Henneberg, & Naudè, 2012). Uncovering these findings would not have been possible without the use of systematic combining and the constant matching between theoretical and empirical domains.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Business-to-business Marketing and Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-080-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Abstract

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Business-to-business Marketing and Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-080-3

Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Abstract

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Business-to-business Marketing and Purchasing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-080-3

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Ulla Hakala, Arja Lemmetyinen and Satu‐Päivi Kantola

The purpose of this paper is to examine the country image of Finland among potential travellers and potential consumers of Finnish products. Three research questions are…

4549

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the country image of Finland among potential travellers and potential consumers of Finnish products. Three research questions are addressed, each of which contributes to the overall aim: What is the level of awareness about Finland among the respondents? How is the awareness constructed in terms of dimensions? Where does the image stem from (the source)?

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among US, French and Swiss university students. Given the high number of respondents who had not visited Finland, the analysis focused on non‐visitors. Six hypotheses were formulated based on existing theory.

Findings

Awareness is a key indicator of people's knowledge about the existence of a country. Branding may be an elementary tool in enhancing awareness as well as altering or reinforcing stereotypical views. The results of this study bring out the cross‐cultural aspects.

Research limitations/implications

Including the respondents’ sources of information enhances the results of previous studies on country image. The findings contribute to the theoretical discussion on the source of the image and the factors that affect it.

Practical implications

Knowledge of the information sources and their role in image building will help destination marketers to influence potential travellers, including non‐visitors, and thereby increase the likelihood of a first or repeat visit.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to focus on awareness of a country among non‐visitors.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Pekka Leviäkangas, Raine Hautala, Virpi Britschgi and Risto Öörni

The aim of this research was to evaluate the new procurement practices of information and communication technology (ICT) services in Finnish-speaking schools in the City…

Abstract

The aim of this research was to evaluate the new procurement practices of information and communication technology (ICT) services in Finnish-speaking schools in the City of Kauniainen. In the new model, schools define their needs and school administration mandates the procurement through tendering. The research included a review of the problems associated with procurement practices and the assessment of the procurement model. The results show that service levels have been improved and unit costs as well as the environmental load have been reduced. The new model requires the schools to have the skills and expertise to define their needs and the competencies to prepare and execute the procurement process. The case analysis of the Finnish “Dream School” in Kauniainen shows that administrative and governance aspects are equally important in successful deployment of technology.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Juan Gabriel Brida, Nicolás Garrido and María Jesús Such Devesa

The purpose of this paper is to explain the onshore satisfaction of cruise passengers, in the port of call of Cartagena de Indias.

2052

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the onshore satisfaction of cruise passengers, in the port of call of Cartagena de Indias.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was given to 1,361 passengers of 28 cruise ships during October and November of 2009, then factor analysis and cluster analysis were employed.

Findings

The results suggest that although visitors held a high overall satisfaction of the onshore experience, there are two dimensions that require the attention of tourist policy makers: the city infrastructure (traffic, noise, cleanliness and infrastructure) and the general shopping experience. In particular, the worst experience seems to be related to street vendors. Moreover, there is evidence that tourists from the USA are more exigent of being fully satisfied.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was only conducted in the months of October and November. Future research can also include the repetition of the study in different seasons to compare results. The study shows that there is a good potential for the growth of tourism activity of the destination because over 52 per cent of the participants declared their intention of return to the city as land tourists and more than 60 per cent will recommend the destination to their friends.

Originality/value

The application of known methodologies to an emergent destination, in which many stakeholders are involved and concerned about cruise tourism evolution and its effects on the destination.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2007

Tommi Laukkanen, Suvi Sinkkonen, Marke Kivijärvi and Pekka Laukkanen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate innovation resistance among mature consumers in the mobile banking context. The reasons inhibiting mature consumers' mobile…

9793

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate innovation resistance among mature consumers in the mobile banking context. The reasons inhibiting mature consumers' mobile banking adoption were compared to those of younger consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Following Ram and Sheth, resistance was measured with five barriers namely Usage, Value, Risk, Tradition and Image barriers. An extensive internet survey was implemented and 1,525 usable responses were collected, of which 370 respondents (24.3 percent) represented the mature consumer segment (age over 55) and 1,155 respondents (75.7 percent) represented the younger consumers.

Findings

The empirical findings indicate that the value barrier is the most intense barrier to mobile banking adoption among both mature and younger consumers. However, aging appears to be related especially to the risk and image barriers; the most significant differences between mature and younger consumers' perceptions of mobile banking were related to input and output mechanisms of information, the battery life of a mobile phone, a fear that the list of PIN codes would be lost and end up in the wrong hands and the usefulness of new technology in general.

Practical implications

The study has practical implications to marketers in different fields in that strategies to overcome resistance to innovations like mobile banking are discussed.

Originality/value

Innovation resistance can be seen as a less developed concept in adoption research. While the majority of studies have focused on the success of innovations and reasons to adopt, this study empirically investigates the reasons preventing innovation adoption.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Pekka Laukkanen, Suvi Sinkkonen and Tommi Laukkanen

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of innovation resistance by dividing internet banking non‐adopters into three groups based on their intentions to…

8402

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to further the understanding of innovation resistance by dividing internet banking non‐adopters into three groups based on their intentions to use the innovation. Thereafter, the aim is to identify how the resistance differs in these customer groups.

Design/methodology/approach

This study identifies three groups of internet banking non‐adopters, namely postponers, opponents and rejectors. The data were collected by conducting an extensive postal survey among the retail banking customers in Finland who had not adopted internet banking. The measurement development was based on consumer resistance theory and the earlier literature on internet banking. Principal component analysis was used to classify the resistance items into five adoption barriers derived from the earlier literature. Thereafter, analysis of variance was used to analyse the statistical differences in resistance to internet banking between the three groups.

Findings

Significant differences were identified between the groups explored. The resistance of the rejectors is much more intense and diverse than that of the opponents, while the postponers show only slight resistance. The results also indicate that psychological barriers are even higher determinants of resistance than usage and value, which are constructs related to ease‐of‐use and usefulness determining acceptance in the traditional technology acceptance model. Moreover, the findings highlight the role of self‐efficacy in bank customers' risk perceptions to internet banking.

Originality/value

This study provides further understanding of what inhibits internet banking adoption by comparing three non‐adopter groups with respect to their resistance to internet banking. It also has implications for management in overcoming non‐adopters' resistance to the innovation.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2012

Christian Grönroos

356

Abstract

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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