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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2019

Salla-Maaria Laaksonen, Alessio Falco, Mikko Salminen, Pekka Aula and Niklas Ravaja

This study investigates how media brand knowledge, defined as a structural feature of the message, influences emotional and attentional responses to, and memory of, news messages.

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates how media brand knowledge, defined as a structural feature of the message, influences emotional and attentional responses to, and memory of, news messages.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-reports, facial electromyography (EMG) and electroencephalography were used as indices of emotional valence, arousal and attention in response to 42 news messages, which varied along the valence and involvement dimensions and were framed with different media brands varying along the familiarity and credibility dimensions.

Findings

Compared to the no-brand condition, news framed with brands elicited more attention. The memory tests indicated that strong media brands override the effect of involvement in information encoding, whereas details of news presented with Facebook were not well encoded. However, the headlines of news framed with Facebook were well retrieved. In addition, negative and high-involvement news elicited higher arousal ratings and corrugator EMG activity. News framed with familiar and high-credibility brands elicited higher arousal ratings.

Research limitations/implications

Relevant for both brand managers and audiences, the findings show that building credibility and familiarity both work as brand attributes to differentiate media brands and influence information processing.

Originality/value

The results highlight the importance of media brands in news reading: as a structural feature, the brand is used as a proxy to process the message content. The study contributes by investigating how the type of source influences the reception and encoding of the mediated information; by investigating the emotional effects of brands; and by confirming previous findings in media psychology literature.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Pekka Aula

This paper aims to discuss the emergence of corporate reputational risk in terms of social media, exploring its threats to and possibilities for organizations' strategic

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33950

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the emergence of corporate reputational risk in terms of social media, exploring its threats to and possibilities for organizations' strategic reputation management.

Design/methodology/approach

Reputation risk, the possibility of damaging one's reputation, presents a threat to organizations in many ways. Little is known, however, about the connections between reputation risk management and social media as a mediated business environment. Following the latest conceptualizations of strategic reputation management and social media, the paper identifies several challenges for organizations. To make sense of this issue, the paper proposes a novel context for strategic reputation management, founded on the metaphor of ambient publicity, which involves not only social media, but also organizations and their stakeholders.

Findings

The paper argues that social media expands the spectrum of reputation risks and boosts risk dynamics, and that social media can have notable effects on corporate‐level strategic endeavors, which must be considered in order to be successful in the modern business environment. Nine tenets for corporate leaders involved in strategic reputation management are presented.

Originality/value

The paper offers new insights on social media's relation to reputation risk and its management. The ambient publicity, for example, has value to leaders involved in strategic reputation management when trying to identify factors characterizing the changing business environment. Understanding ambient publicity as an environment of meaning indicates that organizations, their stakeholders, and the public create a “complex narrative web” surrounding reputation. The more unified this web is, the stronger the organization is in terms of reputation risk.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Pekka Aula and Saku Mantere

The purpose of this paper is to expand knowledge of reputation change as a social process and to explore the implications of a social constructivist view of reputation for…

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1781

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand knowledge of reputation change as a social process and to explore the implications of a social constructivist view of reputation for the challenge of reputation management.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyze the main characteristics of a social constructivist view of reputation, and study its implications for the task of reputation management by means of an interpretative arena model of reputation change.

Findings

The authors build a framework for analyzing reputation change as dialogical interaction between an organization and active stakeholders.

Practical implications

The arena model is a tool for analyzing the task of corporate reputation change management across a variety of contexts. The arena model provides a conceptual tool for making sense of the crucial and intricate challenge of strategic reputation management, which places organizations engaging in struggles and collaborations with the stakeholders in symbolic environments.

Originality/value

The arena model is the first framework seeking to bridge the theoretical challenge of social constructivism with the managerial task of reputation change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 January 2009

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114

Abstract

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Catherine Gorrell

Downloads
95

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

S. Magala

Downloads
166

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Miia Jaatinen and Rita Lavikka

The purpose of this paper is to develop further a theoretical framework of common understanding and explore the role of common understanding in coordination.

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1236

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop further a theoretical framework of common understanding and explore the role of common understanding in coordination.

Design/methodology/approach

A constructive action research approach was employed applying abductive reasoning to develop new models with practical relevance.

Findings

A new framework of the elements of common understanding and a new theory of communication as a mechanism for coordination.

Research limitations/implications

As a longitudinal case study and part of a multiple case‐study, the findings are generalized to theory which should be further developed.

Practical implications

Presents a framework for developing shared meanings to achieve better coordination in collaborative service provisioning.

Originality/value

Presents a new model of common understanding, a refined approach to coordination.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Petro Poutanen, Olli Parviainen and Leif Åberg

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conditions that give rise to and support self‐organizing learning and creativity in blended learning environments. Particular

Downloads
1461

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the conditions that give rise to and support self‐organizing learning and creativity in blended learning environments. Particular attention is given to theoretical and practical suggestions and the roles of on‐ and offline working environments.

Design/methodology/approach

Iterative grounded theory methodology is used to provide a case analysis of a course held at the University of Helsinki in 2010 in conjunction with theoretical discussions.

Findings

Practical advice is provided for organizers of blended learning courses and a theoretical model for self‐organizing in blended learning settings is proposed. Three key considerations of self‐organizing – space, knowledge, and agency –were located and each of them is discussed with a focus on practical recommendations.

Research limitations/implications

More research is needed, especially in a “classroom” context, in order to further clarify the links of different on‐ and offline learning environments and to reach a better understanding of the interplay between them.

Practical implications

The approach presented here can be useful for implementing web‐based blended learning methods in universities and other educational organizations.

Originality/value

Technology‐ and teacher‐oriented views of learning are not successful in the context of blended learning. Conditions for self‐organizing and creativity are needed.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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