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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2009

Peggy E. Chaudhry, Jonathan R. Peters and Alan Zimmerman

The major findings of this exploratory research are that a firm’s level of market commitment through future investments will increase in strategically important markets…

Abstract

The major findings of this exploratory research are that a firm’s level of market commitment through future investments will increase in strategically important markets, regardless of high consumer complicity to purchase fake goods; that companies will employ additional anti‐counterfeiting tactics in markets with a high level of pirates and a high degree of enforcement of its intellectual property rights; and that companies employ a standardized approach of anti‐counterfeiting tactics targeted at consumers.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Peggy E. Chaudhry and Ludovica Cesareo

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the efficacy of messages in anti-counterfeiting campaigns that use a fear of legal prosecution, role models, peer pressure…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the efficacy of messages in anti-counterfeiting campaigns that use a fear of legal prosecution, role models, peer pressure, linkages to organized crime and education.

Design/methodology/approach

A web survey of consumer perceptions regarding the effectiveness of different anti-counterfeiting campaigns on complicity was administered to 1,786 consumers in Brazil, China, India, Russia and the USA.

Findings

The effectiveness of the different anti-counterfeiting campaigns varies by country. Some can be used more successfully than others to limit complicity with the goal to transform consumers from accomplices of infringers to advocates of authenticity.

Research limitations/implications

An unexpected finding of this study was that several of the anti-counterfeiting campaigns were perceived as effective by consumers who reside in countries, such as China, that are well known for flourishing domestic counterfeit markets. Thus, these exploratory results provide a starting point for future researchers and practitioners to create and evaluate the efficacy of messages in anti-counterfeiting campaigns in markets where counterfeits and pirated goods are readily accessible in both physical and virtual markets.

Originality/value

Prior research establishes why consumers accept counterfeit and pirated products and also suggests a number of strategies to decrease its occurrence, mostly from a managerial perspective. This is the first multi-country study to assess whether consumers believe anti-counterfeiting campaigns will curb product counterfeiting.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Peggy E. Chaudhry

The words in the CRM (Customer Relationship Management) have become short‐hand buzz words for describing how firms foster a 360‐degree review of the customer lifecycle…

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1768

Abstract

The words in the CRM (Customer Relationship Management) have become short‐hand buzz words for describing how firms foster a 360‐degree review of the customer lifecycle. The primary goal of this study is to provide a synopsis of innovative CRM concepts that can assist entrepreneurial small firms develop a process to effectively communicate with their customers, such as an e‐newsletter and CD‐ROM direct mail campaign. A practitioner‐oriented model is developed that depicts the CRM process of using multiple communication channels, building loyalty, establishing customer retention tactics, and changing service offers to foster the customer experience.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Stephen A. Stumpf, Peggy E. Chaudhry and Leeann Perretta

To identify ways for business managers to reduce consumer complicity with counterfeit products by better aligning their actions with consumer beliefs of complicity.

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Abstract

Purpose

To identify ways for business managers to reduce consumer complicity with counterfeit products by better aligning their actions with consumer beliefs of complicity.

Design/methodology/approach

A mall intercept methodology was used to interview 54 US and 48 Brazilian business managers' understandings of consumer complicity with counterfeit products. A parallel web survey containing the questions in the interviews was used to assess 401 US and 390 Brazilian consumers' perceptions of what is important to them in determining that a product is counterfeit, the reasons why they were willing to acquire counterfeits, and the perceived effectiveness of anti‐counterfeiting actions.

Findings

Managers in both countries held beliefs that ran counter to those of the complicit consumer, particularly in the areas of understanding the reasons for consumer complicity and the perceived effectiveness of anti‐counterfeiting actions to reduce that complicity. Several anti‐counterfeiting actions considered to be of little use by managers were reported to be important by consumers regarding their intended complicity.

Practical implications

As the different motivations of consumer complicity with counterfeit products in different country markets become better known, managers can reduce their loss of business to counterfeiters by directly targeting those factors each country's consumers believe affect their complicity.

Originality/value

Comparing manager and consumer views of complicity with counterfeit products and the anti‐counterfeiting actions that can reduce that complicity in two country markets.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Peggy E. Chaudhry, Ronald Paul Hill, Stephen A. Stumpf and Goksel Yalcinkaya

The purpose of this investigation is to examine the explanatory powers of a consumer complicity framework that uses counterfeit products and five emerging country markets…

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation is to examine the explanatory powers of a consumer complicity framework that uses counterfeit products and five emerging country markets (Brazil, Russia, India, and China). A web survey was administered to 1,600 consumers in Brazil, Russia, India, and China to test whether demographics, national origin, perceived quality, price, and a hedonic shopping environment predicted consumers' complicity in these emerging markets. Overall, the results found little support for either demographics or national origin to predict this type of illicit consumption. The best predictive variables were perceived quality, price, and hedonic shopping experience. The study concludes with a model that incorporates these results and suggests that future research employ demarketing tactics using both cognitive dissonance and expected utility theories to obtain a more holistic view for curbing complicity that goes beyond product attributes and the shopping environment.

Details

Measurement and Research Methods in International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-095-7

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Peggy E. Chaudhry and Stephen A. Stumpf

The purpose of this paper is to guide marketing managers in their efforts to decrease consumer demand for counterfeits of their products by examining the consumer beliefs…

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8669

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to guide marketing managers in their efforts to decrease consumer demand for counterfeits of their products by examining the consumer beliefs and attitudes that have been found to support consumer complicity across multiple products, in virtual and physical shopping environments, using several criteria of complicity for each product.

Design/methodology/approach

A web‐based survey of 254 students explored two ethical ideologies (idealism and relativism), collectivism, and two attitudes toward counterfeits (ethical concern and perceived quality) with respect to two counterfeit products (movies and pharmaceuticals) and reported respondents' complicity in both a virtual and physical marketplace for each good.

Findings

Consumer complicity – a consumer's willingness to obtain, share, or use counterfeit products – was predicted by the consumers' hedonic shopping experience and lack of ethical concern with two different counterfeit products. The effects of ethical ideologies and collectivism on consumer complicity were observed to operate indirectly through hedonic shopping and ethical concern with using counterfeits.

Research limitations/implications

The primary limitation is the use of a convenience sample of US college students and future research should take the scale items developed in this study and test in multiple country markets.

Originality/value

The paper extends previous research by examining several identified predictors of complicity with different products, across virtual and physical markets, and with multiple criteria incorporating both acquisition, intent to acquire, and willingness to share.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Abstract

Details

Measurement and Research Methods in International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-095-7

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Shaoming Zou

Many thanks to Professors Marko Sarstedt, Manfred Schwaiger, and Charles R. Taylor, Volume 22 has assembled a set of outstanding articles addressing the methodological…

Abstract

Many thanks to Professors Marko Sarstedt, Manfred Schwaiger, and Charles R. Taylor, Volume 22 has assembled a set of outstanding articles addressing the methodological issues in international marketing research. Readers should find these articles informative and valuable. In addition to these articles on the special topic of international marketing research methods, a regular article is included in Volume 22. Advances in International Marketing encourages innovative research and “out-of-the-box” research ideas in international marketing. In future volumes, it will continue to promote special topic-based volumes, while also publishing “regular” papers that are reviewed outside of the themed volumes. The regular papers must show innovative research that addresses any significant issues in international marketing and should be submitted to the Series Editor.

Details

Measurement and Research Methods in International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-095-7

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Claire Youngnyo Joa and Sung-Yeon Park

There is an increasing need for a better understanding of healthcare service marketing in social media. This paper aims to examine Under the framework of positioning…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an increasing need for a better understanding of healthcare service marketing in social media. This paper aims to examine Under the framework of positioning theory, popular Instagram posts related to #plasticsurgery and their accounts were analyzed and the relationships between the posts’ attributes and the number of user comments and likes were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 272 posts associated with #plasticsurgery and their account profiles were analyzed.

Findings

Plastic surgery procedures were positioned on Instagram primarily by doctors and celebrity patients who were motivated by self-promotion. Doctors often omitted their medical credential information from their account profile and posts while featuring their vanity photos, emojis and consultation solicitations. They showed patients as the objects of surgery. On the other hand, patients positioned themselves as individuals with the agency by showing their faces rather than focusing on their body parts. Instagram users responded better to the doctors who positioned themselves more as business owners than medical professionals by soliciting consultations, offering discounts, displaying surgery photos and using emojis. In responding to patient posts, Instagram users liked under-dressed images more than fully clothed images and commented more on before-and-after photos than others.

Social implications

In Instagram, doctors positioned themselves as self-interested providers of plastic surgery services, whereas patients positioned themselves as active consumers. Medical professionals’ social media activities should be more closely monitored to protect patient safety and the trust between patients and doctors.

Originality/value

This study shed light on how doctors and patients position themselves on social media and how they are received by social media users in the context of #plasticsurgery on Instagram.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2006

Raja Parasuraman and Christopher Miller

A fundamental issue driving much of the current research is the design of the interface between humans and ROVs. Autonomous robots are sufficiently different from most…

Abstract

A fundamental issue driving much of the current research is the design of the interface between humans and ROVs. Autonomous robots are sufficiently different from most computer systems as to require new research and design principles (Adams & Skubic, 2005; Kiesler & Hinds, 2004). Previous work on coordination between humans and automated agents has revealed both benefits and costs of automation for system performance (Parasuraman & Riley, 1997). Automation is clearly essential for the operation of many complex human–machine systems. But in some circumstances automation can also lead to novel problems for operators. Automation can increase workload and training requirements, impair situation awareness and, when particular events co-occur in combination with poorly designed interfaces, lead to accidents (e.g., Degani, 2004; Parasuraman & Riley, 1997).

Details

Human Factors of Remotely Operated Vehicles
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-247-4

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