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Article

Matti Christersson, Christopher Heywood and Peggie Rothe

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the social impacts of short-distance office relocation that also involved a new way of working, as perceived by employees…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the social impacts of short-distance office relocation that also involved a new way of working, as perceived by employees during a relocation process. Relocation is any process of moving business premises and can consist of (often) significant change in locality, building change, workplace change and ways of working. This case study was not influenced by the effect of locality change making it hence a short-distance relocation.

Design/methodology/approach

The social impacts are analysed based on the perceptions of approximately 15 per cent (nine employees) of the case organization across the relocation process – two months before, one week before and four months after the move. The qualitative data collection is conducted by semi-structured interviews, supplemented by diaries and participatory action research.

Findings

Before the relocation, the subject organization’s old premises were considered inadequate. Still, employees had concerns during the process about the new open office environment including the adoption of new ways of working. Some employees did experience resistance towards the change, although the amount of engagement possibilities was deemed sufficient and engagement recognized as an important part of the process. After the relocation, adaptation was considered easier than originally anticipated and experiences of improved inter-team collaboration were reported by most while others experienced just the opposite, pointing out to emerging individual differences.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study arise mainly from the ability to statistically generalize on the basis of a single case study which this paper represents. Furthermore, since the last interviews were made four months after the move, all post-occupancy implications were possibly not yet fully experienced.

Originality/value

The paper provides information on the social impacts of organizational relocation process, as it identifies individual employee perceptions during a relocation process where locality change is minimal. Moreover, the threefold research approach across the relocation process enables the appearance of possible time-dependent development of adaptation to change in employee perceptions and these perceptions to be analysed in more detail.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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Article

Heidi Rasila, Peggie Rothe and Heidi Kerosuo

The purpose of this paper is to study the usability dimensions that end‐users utilise when they assess the usability of built environments in Finland.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the usability dimensions that end‐users utilise when they assess the usability of built environments in Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is carried out by utilising directed content analysis. A directed content analysis starts by creating (theoretical) pre‐understanding of possible categories and then goes on to test this pre‐understanding with empirical evidence.

Findings

The findings suggest that the users use 12 different dimensions when they assess the usability of built environments.

Practical implications

Understanding the usability dimensions end‐users use in assessing built environments makes it possible to make improvements in existing environments and in creating new environments that suit end‐user needs better.

Originality/value

Even though discussion about usability dimensions and user experiences is vast, the existing discussion about usability dimensions in built environments is limited and this paper adds understanding of four “new” dimensions that have not been discussed previously in this particular context.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article

Peggie Rothe, Anna‐Liisa Lindholm, Ari Hyvönen and Suvi Nenonen

The work environment has been identified to influence employee satisfaction and work performance. In order to develop and provide work environments that meet the…

Abstract

Purpose

The work environment has been identified to influence employee satisfaction and work performance. In order to develop and provide work environments that meet the preferences of as many employees as possible, more information about user preferences and possible preference differences between different kinds of users is required. The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding concerning office users' work environment preferences. The aim is to investigate whether there are differences in the preferences of office users based on their age, gender, their mobility, and whether they work individually or with others.

Design/methodology/approach

Office users' work environment preferences are studied through a survey directed to office employees. Statistical analysis is used in order to identify work environment preference differences between respondents of different age, gender, and the way they work.

Findings

The results indicate that there are differences between office users' work environment preferences concerning some characteristics of the work environment. The results show that the preferences vary both based on demographic issues such as age and gender as well as based on how they work.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to the Helsinki Metropolitan Area, Finland, so the cultural context has to be taken into account when generalising the results.

Originality/value

The paper provides several stakeholders, such as user organisations, designers, consultants, and investors, valuable information on what kind of work environments office users prefer.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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Article

Heidi Marja Rasila, Peggie Rothe and Suvi Nenonen

This paper aims to present a methodology for assessing end‐user experiences of workplace environments and proposes an “experience sheet” as a way to illustrate the findings.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a methodology for assessing end‐user experiences of workplace environments and proposes an “experience sheet” as a way to illustrate the findings.

Design/methodology/approach

In the theoretical part, the article combines understanding from post‐occupancy evaluations in the facilities management field with service process audits in the hospitability sector. This methodology is then tested in a case environment.

Findings

The findings suggest that the methodology and the experience sheet provide a usable and interesting way of assessing user experience in the workplace environment.

Practical implications

This article offers an illustrative way to understand user experience in workplace environments, and through that helps in improving existing working environments and in creating new ones.

Originality/value

This article combines theoretical understanding in a cross‐disciplinary manner in a novel way, and through that introduces a usable method for workplace improvement for practitioners.

Details

Facilities, vol. 27 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article

Peggie Rothe, Anna‐Liisa Lindholm, Ari Hyvönen and Suvi Nenonen

The paper aims to identify the differences and similarities in work environment preferences of office users of different age.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify the differences and similarities in work environment preferences of office users of different age.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses results of a preference survey answered by more than 1,100 office employees in Finland. The survey included questions concerning user preferences in terms of location, buildings, workspaces, and services. The analysis starts with a principal component analysis (PCA). The respondents are divided into five clusters based on their year of birth, and their responses are compared based on regression analysis. The identified differences are confirmed by discriminant analysis.

Findings

The study shows that there are differences in the work environment preferences of users of different age. Significant differences were found concerning personal services, commuting, collaboration, restaurant services, and adjustability of indoor climate. The study also identifies areas in which preferences between younger and older employees did not differ remarkably, such as privacy and the virtual environment.

Research limitations/implications

While the study indicates that there are preference differences in the workforce as it currently exists, it does not explain whether the identified differences are connected to generations, or if they are simply a result of age and experience.

Practical implications

The paper includes findings that are valuable for all parties that are involved in designing and managing work environments.

Originality/value

The results give new insights on what office users of different age prefer in their work environments. The paper proposes that some general notions regarding generational differences in the workplace lack academic evidence, and presents results that suggest that the differences are not as significant as generally thought.

Details

Facilities, vol. 30 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article

Peggie Rothe, Chris Heywood, Matti Christersson and Anna-Liisa Sarasoja

The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of the management of office relocations in Finnish organisations with a focus on the use of, and need for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of the management of office relocations in Finnish organisations with a focus on the use of, and need for, external advisory services.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a sequential mixed method approach. First, the use of relocation-related services, and organisations’ perception of the need for them, was assessed through a questionnaire sent to all organisations with more than 50 employees in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area (HMA). The data includes 83 responses. Subsequently, service experiences, perceived service needs, and the challenges that organisations face in relocation are studied through thematic interviews with 15 organisations that have recently relocated.

Findings

The findings show that, despite facing many challenges when relocating, many organisations do not consider using external service providers. Most organisations do not acknowledge the complexity of the process until afterwards, and they also lack knowledge of the availability of relocation-related services.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is the population size of the questionnaire. A larger population would have allowed for more generalisations, but the results do provide insight into the organisations’ issues in managing their relocations.

Practical implications

In order to facilitate the better organisational relocation experiences, and to develop the market for relocation-related services, service providers need to begin educating organisations of the challenges and opportunities of relocation, and successively increase the awareness of the availability of services.

Originality/value

Relocation, when it is considered in the literature, is most often construed as being about location, or site selection. This study approaches the phenomenon from the organisations’ perspective and considers relocation a process that needs to be managed.

Details

Property Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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Article

Heidi Rasila and Peggie Rothe

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the youngest generation at work perceives problems that are linked to open‐plan offices. They are the future users of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the youngest generation at work perceives problems that are linked to open‐plan offices. They are the future users of the work environments and thus it is important to understand how they perceive different office solutions. The paper looks at one specific type of job and one group of office employees: generation Y – those born in the 1980s and early 1990s – working in a contact centre environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out as a case study. In total, 20 thematic interviews were conducted among the representatives of generation Y from three different sites of one big Finnish telecommunications company. The themes of the interviews were outlined by a thorough literature review concerning problems that are often linked to open office solutions.

Findings

The findings suggest that in this case, the generation Y employees in fact liked their open‐plan office. They acknowledged most of the issues or “problems” that the literature suggests, but they did not necessarily see these purely in a negative way. Instead, they often perceived these issues as fair trade‐offs for some greater good. This result supports the idea that open‐plan offices are complex and interrelated systems where all parts affect the others.

Research limitation/implications

The main limitation of this research is the small sample size. The results cannot be generalized to all young office employees; rather, they are intended to give a first in‐depth insight into the experiences of one specific group of users in the complex interrelated open‐plan office system.

Originality/value

The paper's findings add to the understanding about how generation Y perceives their work environment. The research also highlights a limitation in earlier open‐plan offices and suggests that future research needs to take a broader perspective on this complex system.

Details

Property Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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Article

Peggie Rothe, Anna-Liisa Sarasoja and Christopher Heywood

This paper aims to examine short-distance firm relocations, the most frequent form of relocation, to better understand how employees as individuals experience those…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine short-distance firm relocations, the most frequent form of relocation, to better understand how employees as individuals experience those relocations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was a multiple-case study with five organisations that had relocated within the same metropolitan area during the previous 18 months. To understand why and how the relocation was carried out, 15 semi-structured interviews were conducted with company representatives who were actively involved in making decisions and executing the relocation of their organisation. Subsequently, to study the employees’ experience and perception of the process, 17 employees who did not have an assigned role in the process were also interviewed.

Findings

The findings show that even within the same organization, people experience relocation differently; therefore, the employees should not be treated as one object of change but as several individuals who experience change. Further, it was identified that relocation included both location and workplace change aspects.

Research limitations/implications

The study is of qualitative nature and, therefore, the findings should not be generalized to individuals outside of the context of study. Instead, the value lies in the description and the themes developed in the specific context. The findings show that emphasis needs to be put on how the relocation process is managed, and that relocation change management efforts should include both location and workplace changes.

Originality/value

This study provides new insight on how individual employees experience the relocation process and augments the previous body of knowledge on employee experiences and satisfaction with various elements in the work environment and/or with new ways of working, and the previous studies on relocation that focus on comparing employees’ experiences of the old office with the new one.

Details

Facilities, vol. 33 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article

Matti Christersson and Peggie Rothe

Relocation is a significant event in the course of an organization's lifetime. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the impacts that relocation has on the relocating…

Abstract

Purpose

Relocation is a significant event in the course of an organization's lifetime. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the impacts that relocation has on the relocating organization itself and to identify the economic, social, and environmental impacts of office occupier relocation.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from the existing literature on impacts of occupiers' relocation, a conceptual framework for modelling organizational relocation impacts is developed. The literature review is done by a systematic review of the ten most relevant journals within the corporate real estate, property, and facilities sector.

Findings

Relocation has various impacts including relocation costs, disruption, employee reactions to change, altered lease attributes, and changed environmental footprint. Further, the changes in productivity, employee satisfaction, employee turnover, organizational dynamics, ways of working, commuting, accessibility for external stakeholders, and organizational culture and image are all possible impacts of organizational relocation.

Research limitations/implications

The identified impacts are limited to office occupiers' short distance relocations. As the paper is conceptual by nature, there is a need for more empirical research on the impacts of relocation. The framework introduced in the article requires testing with experiences of relocated case companies and accordingly, it is to be developed further.

Practical implications

The paper provides central questions that relocating organizations should ask themselves.

Originality/value

Using the perspective of the relocating organization, the paper provides insight into the impacts of relocation from the expanded spectrum of Triple Bottom Line of sustainability. The study is of value to corporate real estate researchers and practitioners.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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Article

Peggie Rothe and Christopher Heywood

The purpose of this paper is to describe different short-distance relocation management approaches applied by organisations in Finland. Corporate short-distance relocation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe different short-distance relocation management approaches applied by organisations in Finland. Corporate short-distance relocation is a significant event in the course of an organisation’s lifetime. While these kinds of relocations happen frequently, they are an infrequent event from the perspective of a single organisation. Therefore, few organisations have experience and knowledge on relocation management, which can result in improvised ways of managing the process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a multiple-case study approach where the relocation management of five organisations is assessed post-relocation. Different aspects of the process, such as process phases and tasks, the organisation involved and employee participation, are scrutinized through 32 interviews with company representatives and documents provided by the organisations.

Findings

The study describes five unique relocations that vary based on the level of change from a “routine move” to a “new beginning”. It further identifies four different models of managing the process: “one-man-show”, “orchestra”, “expert taskforce” and “democracy”.

Originality/value

While previous studies have focused on either site selection decision-making or design of an already chosen space, the study describes five relocation processes that start from the relocation trigger and end when the organisation has relocated and settled into their new space.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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