Search results

1 – 10 of over 17000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 August 2010

Simon Bradstreet and Rebekah Pratt

This article describes the development of peer support roles and programmes in Scotland, and includes findings from an evaluation of a peer support worker pilot scheme…

Abstract

This article describes the development of peer support roles and programmes in Scotland, and includes findings from an evaluation of a peer support worker pilot scheme. The evaluation assessed the impact of the pilot on service users, peer support workers and the wider service system, along with considering the issues involved in implementing peer support programmes.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Clio Berry, Mark I. Hayward and Ruth Chandler

The integration of peer support workers with lived experience of mental health problems into existing mental health services has been found beneficial in some ways…

Abstract

Purpose

The integration of peer support workers with lived experience of mental health problems into existing mental health services has been found beneficial in some ways. However, some peer support workers have experienced unique challenges in terms of role confusion and limited opportunities for networking and support. Qualitative research and evaluation regarding peer support worker integration is limited. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The current paper presents a qualitative evaluation of the experiences of two peer support specialist (PSS) workers and their managers within one UK mental health trust. The PSS workers and managers were interviewed individually using a semi‐structured format. Thematic analysis was applied to the interview transcripts.

Findings

In agreement with prior research and evaluation, positive experiences and challenges were identified in relation to PSS employment, both for PSS workers and their teams. Overarching themes concern the PSS worker as “other”, the PSS worker as a “change agent”, and “readiness for PSS worker employment”.

Originality/value

The evaluation is limited by the small sample size but the findings could be used to inform the integration of PSS workers into other existing services. This evaluation begins to untangle some of the tensions around the integration process. Strategies to support PSS integration based on the recommendations of participants and the findings of the current evaluation are presented.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Fay Jackson and Tim Fong

The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on peer work and insights from Flourish Australia’s journey in growing a thriving peer workforce. Flourish Australia…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a perspective on peer work and insights from Flourish Australia’s journey in growing a thriving peer workforce. Flourish Australia is a large not-for-profit organisation that has been supporting people with their recovery journeys for over 60 years. The organisation provides, predominantly, non-clinical community-based support to enable people who live with a mental health issue and/or psychosocial disabilities to lead contributing lives in their community.

Design/methodology/approach

Flourish Australia developed and implemented a number of strategic directives in order to support the growth of a peer workforce. Central to these directives were policy positions that encouraged a shared understanding of the value and contribution that people with a lived experience of a mental health issue add to an organisation. From this policy foundation, the Why Not a Peer Worker? strategy and Transformation Peer Worker strategy were implemented and embraced by hiring managers across the organisation.

Findings

The “Why Not a Peer Worker?” campaign, coupled with the Transformation Peer Worker strategy, resulted in an increase in Flourish Australia’s peer workforce of almost 600 per cent over an 18-month period to now number 145 positions.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides organisations who are seeking to develop or grow their peer workforce with practical ideas that have been successfully implemented by Flourish Australia that can be discussed and debated when developing a peer workforce.

Originality/value

This paper provides unique insights into Flourish Australia’s peer workforce journey.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Liza Hopkins, Glenda Pedwell, Katie Wilson and Prunella Howell-Jay

The purpose of this study was to identify and understand the barriers and enablers to the implementation of youth peer support in a clinical mental health service. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to identify and understand the barriers and enablers to the implementation of youth peer support in a clinical mental health service. The development of a lived experience workforce in mental health is a key component of policy at both the state and the federal level in Australia. Implementing a peer workforce within existing clinical services, however, can be a challenging task. Furthermore, implementing peer support in a youth mental health setting involves a further degree of complexity, involving a degree of care for young people being invited to provide peer support when they may be still early in their own recovery journey.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on a formative evaluation of the beginning stages of implementation of a youth peer workforce within an existing clinical mental health service in Melbourne.

Findings

The project found that it was feasible and beneficial to implement youth peer support; however, significant challenges remain, including lack of appropriate training for young people, uncertainty amongst clinical staff about the boundaries of the peer role and the potential for “tokenism” in the face of slow cultural change across the whole service.

Originality/value

Very little evaluation has yet been undertaken into the effectiveness of implementing peer support in youth mental health services. This paper offers an opportunity to investigate where services may need to identify strengths and address difficulties when undertaking future implementation efforts.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Kyt Proctor, Rachael Wood and Katherine Newman-Taylor

A pilot project commissioned to assess feasibility and impact of peer support in an Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) service highlighted the importance of team…

Abstract

Purpose

A pilot project commissioned to assess feasibility and impact of peer support in an Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) service highlighted the importance of team readiness. The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the lessons learned in recognising and facilitating team readiness in an NHS setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature suggests that mental health teams need to be ready to implement peer support, if this is to be done successfully. The authors describe the process of preparing for peer support, obstacles that arose and ways that the team found to address these.

Findings

The team had actively sought to develop peer support for some time, and negotiated with Trust managers to agree these roles in principle. However, initially unspoken concerns about duty of care emerged as a key obstacle. An arguably paternalistic desire to protect potential peer worker colleagues from stress and distress could have resulted in unnecessary risk aversion and a narrowing of the role. Willingness and opportunity to reflect on the change in relationship from service user/professionals to colleagues enabled these concerns to be aired, and practical solutions agreed.

Practical implications

Team enthusiasm is not the same as team readiness. The team’s willingness to identify and reflect on implicit concerns facilitated an acceptance of the change in relationship with peer workers, which in turn enabled the development of standard operating procedures to ensure safe and effective peer support as “business as usual.”

Originality/value

This paper considers the process of welcoming peer workers in an EIP team and offers practical suggestions that may be of value to other teams seeking to implement peer support in similar adult mental health settings.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Nicole Margaret Nannen

Peer support workers are becoming more involved in mental health services in Australia. Peer support workers have had to overcome challenges and dilemmas whilst embedding…

Abstract

Purpose

Peer support workers are becoming more involved in mental health services in Australia. Peer support workers have had to overcome challenges and dilemmas whilst embedding their role within mental health settings. This includes coping with scrutiny from fellow colleagues, supporting consumers and managing their own mental health. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper will explore the author’s perspective and experience of working as a peer support worker in a psychiatric hospital and how the skills, knowledge and values she has developed during her recovery from mental illness have been essential in undertaking the daily activities with consumers and clinicians, overcoming the challenges and dilemmas, and managing her own wellness.

Findings

The paper provides insight into the experience of a peer support worker at a psychiatric hospital for adults.

Originality/value

The author’s personal experience of being a peer support worker in a mental health facility.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Steve Gillard, Rhiannon Foster, Sarah Gibson, Lucy Goldsmith, Jacqueline Marks and Sarah White

Peer support is increasingly being introduced into mainstream mental health services internationally. The distinctiveness of peer support, compared to other mental health…

Abstract

Purpose

Peer support is increasingly being introduced into mainstream mental health services internationally. The distinctiveness of peer support, compared to other mental health support, has been linked to values underpinning peer support. Evidence suggests that there are challenges to maintaining those values in the context of highly standardised organisational environments. The purpose of this paper is to describe a “principles-based” approach to developing and evaluating a new peer worker role in mental health services.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of peer support values was generated through systematic review of research about one-to-one peer support, and a second set produced by a UK National Expert Panel of people sharing, leading or researching peer support from a lived experience perspective. Value sets were integrated by the research team – including researchers working from a lived experience perspective – to produce a principles framework for developing and evaluating new peer worker roles.

Findings

Five principles referred in detail to: relationships based on shared lived experience; reciprocity and mutuality; validating experiential knowledge; leadership, choice and control; discovering strengths and making connections. Supporting the diversity of lived experience that people bring to peer support applied across principles.

Research limitations/implications

The principles framework underpinned development of a handbook for a new peer worker role, and informed a fidelity index designed to measure the extent to which peer support values are maintained in practice. Given the diversity of peer support, the authors caution against prescriptive frameworks that might “codify” peer support and note that lived experience should be central to shaping and leading evaluation of peer support.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the literature on peer support in mental health by describing a systematic approach to understanding how principles and values underpin peer worker roles in the context of mental health services. This paper informs an innovative, principles-based approach to developing a handbook and fidelity index for a randomised controlled trial. Lived experiences of mental distress brought to the research by members of the research team and the expert advisors shaped the way this research was undertaken.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Chris Lloyd, Philip Lee Williams, Gabrielle Vilic and Samson Tse

Initiated by the service user movement, recovery-oriented practices are one of the keystones of modern mental health care. Over the past two decades, substantial gains…

Abstract

Purpose

Initiated by the service user movement, recovery-oriented practices are one of the keystones of modern mental health care. Over the past two decades, substantial gains have been made with introducing recovery-oriented practice in many areas of mental health practice, but there remain areas where progress is delayed, notably, the psychiatric inpatient environment. The peer support workforce can play a pivotal role in progressing recovery-oriented practices. The purpose of this paper is to provide a pragmatic consideration of how occupational therapists can influence mental health systems to work proactively with a peer workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed current literature and considered practical approaches to building a peer workforce in collaboration with occupational therapists.

Findings

It is suggested that the peer support workforce should be consciously enhanced in the inpatient setting to support culture change as a matter of priority. Occupational therapists working on inpatient units should play a key role in promoting and supporting the growth in the peer support workforce. Doing so will enrich the Occupational Therapy profession as well as improving service user outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to provide a pragmatic consideration of how occupational therapists can influence mental health systems to work proactively with a peer workforce.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Dominiek Coates, Patrick Livermore and Raichel Green

There has been a significant growth in the employment of peer workers over the past decade in youth and adult mental health settings. Peer work in mental health services…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been a significant growth in the employment of peer workers over the past decade in youth and adult mental health settings. Peer work in mental health services for older people is less developed, and there are no existing peer work models for specialist mental health services for older people in Australia. The authors developed and implemented a peer work model for older consumers and carers of a specialist mental health service. The purpose of this paper is to describe the model, outline the implementation barriers experienced and lesson learned and comment on the acceptability of the model from the perspective of stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

To ensure the development of the peer work model met the needs of key stakeholders, the authors adopted an evaluation process that occurred alongside the development of the model, informed by action research principles. To identify stakeholder preferences, implementation barriers and potential solutions, and gain insight into the acceptability and perceived effectiveness of the model, a range of methods were used, including focus groups with the peer workers, clinicians and steering committee, consumer and carer surveys, field notes and examination of project documentation.

Findings

While the model was overall well received by stakeholders, the authors experienced a range of challenges and implementation barriers, in particular around governance, integrating the model into existing systems, and initial resistance to peer work from clinical staff.

Originality/value

Older peer workers provide a valuable contribution to the mental health sector through the unique combination of lived experience and ageing. The authors recommend that models of care are developed prior to implementation so that there is clarity around governance, management, reporting lines and management of confidentiality issues.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Julie Repper and Emma Watson

In April 2010, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS trust won Regional Innovation Funding to recruit, train and employ six peer support workers in community mental health teams…

Abstract

Purpose

In April 2010, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS trust won Regional Innovation Funding to recruit, train and employ six peer support workers in community mental health teams. At the time, practical examples of the employment of peer support workers were lacking in England. An earlier paper focuses on the lessons learned in this first year of peer support. The aim of this paper is to examine the nature and dynamics of peer support: what the peers did with clients and what difference this made.

Design/methodology/approach

The project was evaluated using a simple evaluation model reflecting service structure, processes and outcomes, collected through qualitative methods: documentary analysis, semi‐structured interviews and a focus group.

Findings

The six peers worked with 83 clients over the six month period. They offered emotional, practical, social support, support specific to care and support specific to recovery. They felt that the shared knowledge that they too had experienced mental health challenges was critical in engaging with clients in a trusting relationship and in informing their work.

Originality/value

In the absence of English service models for peer support workers, this paper provides some guidance for new peer support teams, and some evidence to support the helpful nature of peer support work.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 17000