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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Philip H. Siegel

This article shows how peer relationships in work settings can affect adjustments and personal and professional growth during stressful periods caused by mergers and…

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Abstract

This article shows how peer relationships in work settings can affect adjustments and personal and professional growth during stressful periods caused by mergers and acquisitions. After identifying subordinate, peer and mentoring relationships and demonstrating how individuals normally form such relationships at various career stages, the study finds that peer relationships may provide an antidote to stress at all professional levels. Moreover, accountants tend to favor the psycho‐social aspect of peer relationships during and after a merger.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Denise L. Peroune

The purpose of this article is to investigate the role peer relationships play in making tacit knowledge explicit and accessible in the wider organization and whether they…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to investigate the role peer relationships play in making tacit knowledge explicit and accessible in the wider organization and whether they contribute to learning in a learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A dominant‐less dominant design, with the qualitative design being the dominant paradigm. Semi‐structured interviews provided qualitative data while the dimensions of the learning organization questionnaire (DLOQ) yielded quantitative data.

Findings

It was found that peer relationships provide the context within which sensemaking can take place and that the peer relationship by definition is the context within which these constructs already function effectively.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are relevant to this case, a small organization within a specific industry, printing, and so cannot be generalized. Existing research addresses sensemaking in hierarchical organizations. Future research should address sensemaking in the context of the flatter organization. Such research must look at the role of peer relationships.

Originality/value

Adds to limited existing body of knowledge peer relationships. Shows how peer relationships can contribute to learning within the organization through the use of dialogue, inquiry, and the process of sensemaking and that the learning organization is environment in which sharing of tacit knowledge can take place.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Fergus Gracey, Suzanna Watson, Meghan McHugh, Andrew Swan, Ayla Humphrey and Anna Adlam

Clinically significant childhood acquired brain injury (ABI) is associated with increased risk of emotional and behavioural dysfunction and peer relationship problems. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Clinically significant childhood acquired brain injury (ABI) is associated with increased risk of emotional and behavioural dysfunction and peer relationship problems. The purpose of this paper is to determine how emotional and peer related problems for children with ABI compare with those of children referred to mental health services, and to identify clinical predictors of peer relationship problems in a heterogeneous sample typical of a specialist community rehabilitation setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 51 children with clinically significant ABI (32 traumatic brain injury; 29 male) referred for outpatient neuropsychological rehabilitation. Emotional, behavioural and social outcomes were measured using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), and executive functioning was measured with the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Functions. Correlational analyses were used to explore variables associated with peer relationships. A subgroup (n=27) of children with ABI were compared to an age and sex matched mental health group to determine differences on SDQ subscales.

Findings

The SDQ profiles of children with clinically significant ABI did not significantly differ from matched children referred to mental health services. Time since injury, peer relationship problems, metacognitive, and behavioural problems correlated with age at injury. These variables and SDQ emotional problems correlated with peer relationship problems. Linear multiple regression analysis indicated that only metacognitive skills remained a significant predictor of peer relationship problems, and metacognitive skills were found to significantly mediate between age at injury and peer relationship problems.

Research limitations/implications

The study confirms the significant effect of childhood ABI on relationships with peers and mental health, those injured at a younger age faring worst. Within the methodological constraints of this study, the results tentatively suggest that age of injury influences later peer relationships via the mediating role of poor metacognitive skills within a heterogeneous clinical sample.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the roles of emotional, behavioural and executive variables on the effect of age at injury on peer relationship problems in a sample with a wide range of ages and ages of injury.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Elly Quinlan, Trevor Crowe, Frank P. Deane and Meredith Whittington

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a peer mentoring relationship may support provisional psychologists engaged in postgraduate education in Australia. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a peer mentoring relationship may support provisional psychologists engaged in postgraduate education in Australia. The theoretical lens for this study draws from the real relationship framework and significant events literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative and qualitative data were obtained via a web survey from a sample of 23 mentors and 41 mentees. Participants had engaged in a one-year peer mentoring program on a volunteer basis. The survey contained measures of functions of mentoring, perceived genuineness and realism in the relationship, and overall satisfaction with peer mentoring. Participants also provided accounts of helpful events, hindering events and open feedback.

Findings

Perceived satisfaction was significantly correlated with greater genuineness and realism in the relationship. Satisfaction was associated with psychosocial and clinical functions of mentoring for both mentors and mentees, and career functions for mentees only. Qualitative findings indicated that the most helpful events included psychosocial support, mutual understanding and skill development. The most frequent hindering events were logistics/time, lack of structure and mentor technique/activity.

Practical implications

Peer mentors show great promise for supporting provisional psychologists. Recommendations for higher education providers include providing peer mentors with guidance regarding the importance of psychosocial support, clinical skill development and creating genuine and real relationships. Peer mentor training would also benefit from the inclusion of career development strategies and psychoeducation on transference.

Originality/value

This study is the first to apply the real relationship framework and significant events analysis to the psychology peer mentoring context.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Angélique Rodhain and Philippe Aurier

– The purpose of this paper is to study the child–brand relationship dynamic in interaction with the relationships children develop with their family, peers and teacher.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the child–brand relationship dynamic in interaction with the relationships children develop with their family, peers and teacher.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, six classes in French primary schools are observed for six months. Among the 112 children observed, aged 10-11 years, 24 of them are interviewed twice individually and 24 others are interviewed in focus groups.

Findings

A lack of coherence between parents, peers and the teacher, as well as with the child’s own desires, affects the child–brand relationship and reduces the child’s self-esteem. Based on this, this study proposes a four-case typology of child–brand relationship dynamics with two criteria: the child’s attitude toward the brand relationship (favorable and unfavorable) and the consistency of attitudes in his/her socialization spheres (peers, parents and teacher) relative to this relationship. Then, the most frequent trajectories children follow across these brand relationship cases are identified.

Research limitations/implications

This study applies to branded clothes.

Practical implications

From a marketer’s perspective, this study reveals that there are different qualities in child–brand relationships. The strongest one appears when the child feels free from outside pressure and when peers, parents and the teacher create a virtuous circle for brands (or at least do not contradict the child’s desires for brands).

Social implications

For public policymakers, it can be useful to be aware that when peers, parents and teachers’ opinions about brands differ, this affects the child’s self-esteem.

Originality/value

The study offers a dynamic approach to child–brand relationships.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 July 2022

Magan Calhoun and Vikkie McCarthy

As public accounting firms continue to leverage technology to retain and recruit employees, options for flexible work arrangements (FWAs) expand. However, offering FWAs…

Abstract

Purpose

As public accounting firms continue to leverage technology to retain and recruit employees, options for flexible work arrangements (FWAs) expand. However, offering FWAs may not be enough. This study aims to investigate the influence of FWAs on perceived peer resentment and turnover intentions in public accounting. A mediation effect of perceived peer resentment between types of FWAs used and turnover intentions is explored.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on survey data collected from a total of 212 respondents currently or recently working in public accounting. Hypotheses have been tested using ordinary least squares regression and the PROCESS macro in SPSS.

Findings

Study findings indicate that the number of types of FWAs used and perceived peer resentment positively influence turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

This study explores developments in retaining and recruiting employees when public accounting firms implement FWAs. In particular, it discusses a new potential unintended consequence, perceived peer resentment toward employees using FWAs.

Practical implications

Public accounting firms that seek to retain and recruit top talent must go beyond offering various forms of FWAs if they intend to reduce turnover in their firms. This study provides evidence that peer relationships play a greater role in the turnover intention process when FWAs are used.

Originality/value

This study is among a few which examine the variable perceived peer resentment in relationship to FWAs and its influence on turnover in public accounting firms.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Carolyn Gregoric and Annabelle Wilson

– The purpose of this paper is to explore an informal interdisciplinary peer-mentoring relationship between two early career researchers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore an informal interdisciplinary peer-mentoring relationship between two early career researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach, using autoethnography, was employed to explore the relationship from a complex adaptive systems (CAS) perspective.

Findings

Informal peer-mentoring relationships may improve the work effectiveness and quality of the doctoral student and early career researcher experience. CAS can be an effective overarching theory for expanding understandings about mentoring.

Research limitations/implications

This case study is limited to two early career researchers.

Practical implications

Informal peer mentoring may help to overcome challenges encountered by doctoral students, early career researchers and university staff members. CAS accounts of mentoring have the potential to open new possibilities for future mentoring research.

Originality/value

This paper provides unique insights into the experiences of doctoral students postgraduation and a long-term informal peer-mentoring relationship. Explorations of mentoring relationships from a CAS perspective are innovative.

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2021

Tehreem Fatima, Ahmad Raza Bilal, Muhammad Kashif Imran, Arslan Ayub and Hira Arshad

The purpose of this study is to uncover how peer ostracism (POS) elicits knowledge hiding directed towards ostracizing peers through the intervening role of peer contact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to uncover how peer ostracism (POS) elicits knowledge hiding directed towards ostracizing peers through the intervening role of peer contact quality (PCQ). Moreover, the authors aim to highlight the role of the need to belong (NTB) as a first-order boundary condition in direct and indirect hypothesized paths.

Design/methodology/approach

The research opted for a three-wave time-lagged survey design. The data were obtained from the 234 teaching and non-teaching employees working in Higher Educational Sector in Pakistan through random sampling. Mediation and moderated mediation analysis was done by using PROCESS Models 4 and 7.

Findings

The results embraced the mediation, moderation and moderated mediation hypotheses. It was noted that POS creates negative exchange relationships. As a result, the ostracized employees withhold knowledge from the predating peer. NTB served as a buffering agent between POS and PCQ, as well as, in the indirect POS, PCQ and peer-directed knowledge hiding relationship.

Practical implications

This research serves as a guideline for management and faculty of Higher Educational Institutions for minimization of POS to promote effective collegial contact quality and curb knowledge hiding.

Originality/value

Although the research in workplace ostracism and knowledge hiding is not new, yet how this association emerges from the viewpoint of peers is not known. This study has added to the literature by answering who is more likely to reciprocate ostracism from peers by having poor quality contact and directing knowledge hiding towards the predator. By this, the authors have added to the limited stream of moderated mediation mechanisms underlying ostracism and knowledge hiding behaviour. In addition, the authors have drawn attention to the importance of peer relationships in higher educational settings.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Shuai Yang, Yiping Song, Sixing Chen and Xin Xia

This study aims to provide a taxonomy of relational benefits that drive customer loyalty in sharing-economy services, assess the relative strengths of these relational…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a taxonomy of relational benefits that drive customer loyalty in sharing-economy services, assess the relative strengths of these relational benefits in influencing customer loyalty and examine whether commitment mediates the influence of relational benefits on customer loyalty in this context.

Design/methodology/approach

Relational benefits of sharing-economy services were explored through a focus group interview, followed by an online survey completed by 440 respondents in China. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This study shows that confidence and social benefits have significant and positive effects on commitment in sharing-economy services. In addition, safety benefits, a new type of relational benefits, also significantly affect commitment in this context. Furthermore, the findings suggest that commitment acts as a mediator between confidence, social and safety benefits and customer loyalty. Special treatment benefits had no effect on commitment and loyalty in the sharing-economy context.

Practical implications

This paper provides sharing-economy service providers with insight on how to better create and sustain loyal relationships with customers through the provision of relational benefits.

Originality/value

This study offers initial insight into why customers would stay in peer-to-peer relationships in the sharing economy, and suggests how to strengthen relationships between customers and peer service providers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2015

Mallory D. Minter, Monica A. Longmore, Peggy C. Giordano and Wendy D. Manning

Prior researchers have documented significant effects of family violence on adult children’s own risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). Yet, few studies have examined…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior researchers have documented significant effects of family violence on adult children’s own risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). Yet, few studies have examined whether exposure to family violence while growing up as well as emerging adults’ reports of their current peers’ behaviors and attitudes influenced self-reports of intimate partner violence perpetration. The current study based on interviews with a large, heterogeneous sample of men and women assessed the degree to which current peers’ attitudes and behaviors contributed to risk of intimate partner violence perpetration, net of family violence.

Methodology/approach

Using data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (TARS) (n = 928), we examined associations between family violence indicators, peers’ behaviors and attitudes, and self-reports of intimate violence perpetration among adults ages 22–29. We used ordinary least squares regression and controlled for other known correlates of IPV.

Findings

For men and women, we found a significant relationship between witnessing parental violence during adolescence and IPV perpetration in emerging adulthood, and a positive relationship between current peers’ IPV experiences and attitudes and respondents’ perpetration. We also found that for respondents who reported higher, compared with lower, peer involvement in partner violence, the effects of parental violence were stronger.

Originality/value

We provided a more comprehensive assessment of peers’ IPV to this body of research, which tends to focus on family violence. Studies have examined peers’ attitudes and behavior during adolescence, but we extended this work by examining both peer and familial influences into emerging adulthood.

Details

Violence and Crime in the Family: Patterns, Causes, and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-262-7

Keywords

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