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Book part
Publication date: 22 December 2016

Andrea North-Samardzic and Michael Cohen

We examine the question of whether peer-mentoring programs in higher education develop leadership skills in student mentors.

Abstract

Purpose

We examine the question of whether peer-mentoring programs in higher education develop leadership skills in student mentors.

Methodology/approach

The various forms of peer mentoring are discussed, as well as the benefits that these programs can bestow on mentors. We then turn to a discussion of the relationship between peer mentoring and leadership, and place particular emphasis on implicit leadership theories and the research in this area. A case study of a large peer-mentoring program at an Australian university is undertaken and the various aspects of implicit leadership theory are examined in the light of comments collected from both mentees and mentors.

Findings

Evidence of implicit leadership skills of mentors was seen in the responses of mentees. However, the explicit treatment of leadership skills in the peer-mentoring program needs to be approached in a more deliberate manner if students are to benefit fully from the experience of mentoring.

Originality/value

While the results of this study were inconclusive, it does provide a basis for further inspection of leadership development within peer-mentoring communities.

Details

Integrating Curricular and Co-Curricular Endeavors to Enhance Student Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-063-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Linda Holbeche

Describes the differences between “conventional” mentoring and peer mentoring. Highlights the increasing relevance and need for peer mentoring in changing organization…

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Abstract

Describes the differences between “conventional” mentoring and peer mentoring. Highlights the increasing relevance and need for peer mentoring in changing organization structures where management support may be disappearing or non‐existent. Outlines various approaches to establishing peer mentoring relationships, whether this is at the initiative of individuals or of the organization. Identifies some of the potential pitfalls, as well as the key benefits of peer mentoring relationships.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 1 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Benterah C. Morton and Elizabeth Gil

The purpose of this paper is to describe the origins of a co-constructed peer-mentoring model designed by and for early-career faculty representing historically…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the origins of a co-constructed peer-mentoring model designed by and for early-career faculty representing historically underrepresented groups in the field of educational leadership. The model, which includes components of the multicultural feminist model of mentoring, pays specific attention to early-career faculty development and well-being and outlines the need for and benefits of peer-mentoring programs.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study details the experiences of the development and implementation of a peer-mentoring program based on a review of literature that points out the need to provide mentoring opportunities for early-career educational leadership faculty, from historically underrepresented populations, and further posits peer-mentoring as an avenue to enhance faculty development and well-being.

Findings

Faculty representing historically underrepresented groups often experience challenges related to their identities, alongside the general pressures of working toward tenure. Peer-mentoring groups provide support with which to navigate these challenges. Peer-mentor groups are a supplement to other professional groups and interactions within departments and institutions.

Practical implications

The model has implications of being able to prepare institutional leaders to work toward institutionalizing mentoring programs that take into consideration invisible labor while promoting professional growth and personal wellness, thereby increasing the satisfaction and retention of faculty.

Originality/value

This peer-mentoring model can be used as a tool to leverage collective support, rather than emphasize individual success. As a support vehicle, it can foster a cultural change within the field of educational leadership that supports collaboration over competition.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Kat McConnell, Rachel Louise Geesa and Kendra Lowery

The purpose of this paper is to discover peer mentors’ perspectives of an education doctoral (Doctorate of Education) peer mentoring program implemented in a mid-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discover peer mentors’ perspectives of an education doctoral (Doctorate of Education) peer mentoring program implemented in a mid-sized public institution.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from one focus group and an interview collected from peer mentors as part of a larger case study of mentors and mentees in a peer mentoring program for education doctoral students are presented. Four (n=4) peer mentors participated in a focus group (n=3) and an interview (n=1). Participants were asked about their perceptions of the program and their experiences as mentors.

Findings

Four themes were discovered within the data: mentors relate to social, emotional and academic life balances of mentees, mentors provide support and reassurance to mentees, mentors guide mentees to focus on the future, and mentors gain personal and professional growth from the peer mentoring program. Results indicated that mentors believed that the program was helpful for their mentees and beneficial to their own personal and professional development.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include the small sample size (n=4) and the short period of time in which participants were asked to be a part of the mentoring program and reflect in focus groups and interview (one academic year). Implications of this study include the benefits of peer mentoring for both mentors and mentees alike.

Originality/value

In contrast to many other studies of peer mentoring programs, this peer mentoring program targeted scholar-practitioner students who were balancing full-time careers with their coursework and family lives. Thus, peer mentors focused more on career and work-life balance with mentees than mentors may in other programs, as well as finding benefit to their own professional development.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2014

Ouedraogo Noufou, Davar Rezania and Muhammad Hossain

– The purpose of this paper is to measure students’ willingness to mentor their peers and explores key factors to student peer mentoring effectiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure students’ willingness to mentor their peers and explores key factors to student peer mentoring effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a hybrid research methodology consisting of a survey and a focus group discussion. The survey was conducted with students of a bachelor of commerce (BCom) program of a North American university to analyze the impact of organizational culture and altruism on their willingness to mentor their peers. The focus group discussion was carried out with students of the same program to explore the objectives, focus, and factors contributing to their willingness to mentor and to peer mentoring effectiveness.

Findings

Organizational culture and altruism significantly affect students’ emotional and intentional willingness to mentor their peers. Peer mentoring can help students prepare their transition from high school to university, guide them through university programs, and help them prepare their transition from university to workplace. Critical factors to peer mentoring effectiveness include a good fit between mentors and mentees, a reasonable ratio of mentor to protégés, and an understanding of and a willingness to address each student's specific needs.

Practical implications

Business schools should embrace and promote a culture of mutual help, look for altruistic students as prospective peer mentors, and promote voluntary student peer mentoring. A mentoring program should be flexible enough to meet each student's needs. Attention should be paid to finding a good fit between mentors and protégés. Communication should focus on the benefits of student peer mentoring for mentors and protégés.

Originality/value

This research brings empirical evidence on peer mentoring by testing and confirming the impact of altruism and organizational culture on students’ willingness to mentor their peers. It also provides practical insight to business schools for implementing student peer mentoring programs.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Amanda Rockinson-Szapkiw, Jessica Herring Watson, Jackie Gishbaugher and Jillian L. Wendt

While previous research has examined the effectiveness of peer mentoring from the mentee's perspective, more research is needed to uncover how and why the interplay of the…

Abstract

Purpose

While previous research has examined the effectiveness of peer mentoring from the mentee's perspective, more research is needed to uncover how and why the interplay of the peer-mentoring relationship in a virtual format, especially for racial and ethnic minority (REM) women in historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) seeking a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) degree, impacts STEM success. This study seeks to address weaknesses in the mentoring literature by presenting a thorough and thick description of the peer mentoring experience for REM women in HBCU pursuing STEM degrees.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-site case study approach (Yin, 2014) was employed to explore to what extent, if at all, and how did participating in the virtual STEM peer-mentoring experience influence peer mentees' STEM beliefs, interests, skills and behaviors.

Findings

Findings demonstrated that the experiences of undergraduate REM women mentees supported engagement in virtual STEM peer mentoring as it was beneficial to developing a sense of belonging, enhancing interest in STEM, encouraging STEM identity, building STEM self-efficacy and, ultimately, promoting STEM persistence. The current study provides a rich picture of how and why peer mentoring is perceived as effective by mentees in STEM programs at HBCUs.

Originality/value

The findings from this study contribute greatly to the body of knowledge and will serve as a foundational model on which future VSTEM PM relationships can be built and fostered among other HBCUs, with the potential to broaden participation in STEM.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Amanda Rockinson-Szapkiw and Jillian L. Wendt

The unequitable representation among genders in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) degrees and careers remains a persisting challenge. Peer mentoring

Abstract

Purpose

The unequitable representation among genders in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) degrees and careers remains a persisting challenge. Peer mentoring has been cited as one method for supporting women and racial and ethnic minorities in becoming interested in, experiencing self-efficacy in and persisting in STEM. The current study was undertaken to explore how and in what ways peer mentors' participation in the program (namely, the mentoring experience) influenced their STEM self-efficacy beliefs, interests, skills and behaviors, including their intent to persist and actual persistence in STEM.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multisite case study design, the current study implemented a blended peer mentoring program at two historically black institutions.

Findings

The experience in the peer mentoring process increased mentors' self-efficacy, career interest, perceived mentoring skill development in most areas and intent to persist in STEM. Evidence from the interviews and open-ended survey questions demonstrated that the peer mentoring experience had a direct influence on the mentor's self-efficacy, career interest, leadership and professional skills and persistence. The thematic analysis of the data sources revealed that specific elements of the peer mentoring experience influenced mentors' beliefs, interests, skills and behaviors, including recognition, functioning as a mentor, developing an other's orientation, engaging in a sisterhood and developing competencies.

Originality/value

Findings support the benefit of the blended peer mentoring program model among women who identify as a racial or ethnic minority across two historically black college or universities (HBCUs). Peer mentoring programs should include training to increase competencies and skills, should provide resources targeted to specific mentor needs and should include opportunities for self-reflection and components of faculty support.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2018

Maureen Nokuthula Sibiya, Thembelihle Sylvia Patience Ngxongo and Somavathy Yvonne Beepat

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of peer mentoring on critical care nursing students’ learning outcomes in critical care units.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the influence of peer mentoring on critical care nursing students’ learning outcomes in critical care units.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative exploratory research design was used to conduct the study. Ten critical care nursing students were recruited from critical care units in the five private and two public hospitals. Descriptions of their experiences were gained through individual face-to-face interviews.

Findings

The study reinforces peer mentoring as a vital strategy in helping the critical care nursing students to attain their learning outcomes. However, peer mentoring was not consistent in all hospitals and there were no structured support systems to ensure that peer mentoring was formalized. Making peer mentoring a vital component in the registered nurses core competencies would enable efficiency and guarantee the viability of peer mentoring.

Research limitations/implications

Mentors for the critical care nursing students were not included in the study.

Practical implications

The study identified a need for incorporating a formalized mentorship programme into the core competencies of all qualified critical care nurses, the unit mentor to familiarise themselves with the prescribed learning objectives of the critical care nursing student and an allocation of supernumerary time for the critical care nursing student and mentors to allow for formal mentoring responsibilities to take place.

Originality/value

The study reinforces peer mentoring as a vital strategy in helping the critical care nursing students to attain their learning outcomes and conscietises registered nurses of their responsibility as mentors.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Elly Quinlan, Trevor Crowe, Frank P. Deane and Meredith Whittington

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a peer mentoring relationship may support provisional psychologists engaged in postgraduate education in Australia. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a peer mentoring relationship may support provisional psychologists engaged in postgraduate education in Australia. The theoretical lens for this study draws from the real relationship framework and significant events literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative and qualitative data were obtained via a web survey from a sample of 23 mentors and 41 mentees. Participants had engaged in a one-year peer mentoring program on a volunteer basis. The survey contained measures of functions of mentoring, perceived genuineness and realism in the relationship, and overall satisfaction with peer mentoring. Participants also provided accounts of helpful events, hindering events and open feedback.

Findings

Perceived satisfaction was significantly correlated with greater genuineness and realism in the relationship. Satisfaction was associated with psychosocial and clinical functions of mentoring for both mentors and mentees, and career functions for mentees only. Qualitative findings indicated that the most helpful events included psychosocial support, mutual understanding and skill development. The most frequent hindering events were logistics/time, lack of structure and mentor technique/activity.

Practical implications

Peer mentors show great promise for supporting provisional psychologists. Recommendations for higher education providers include providing peer mentors with guidance regarding the importance of psychosocial support, clinical skill development and creating genuine and real relationships. Peer mentor training would also benefit from the inclusion of career development strategies and psychoeducation on transference.

Originality/value

This study is the first to apply the real relationship framework and significant events analysis to the psychology peer mentoring context.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Sara Connolly

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of first generation peer mentoring experiences on retention, grade point average and students’ perception of their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of first generation peer mentoring experiences on retention, grade point average and students’ perception of their academic and leadership development.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized a mixed methods approach. Focus groups and interviews were utilized to determine the reported leadership experiences of the mentors. Descriptive statistics were used to compare grade point averages and retention rates.

Findings

The study found peer mentors in residential life perceived an increase in leadership skills; including role modeling, time management, personal confidence, and problem solving. The peers were challenged in their roles, and perceived these challenges to help them to grow as leaders. When compared to their peers, the peer mentors experienced increased retention and similar grade point averages. The results indicated that peer mentoring experiences can be beneficial for the mentors who are first generation college students, even experiences that are particularly challenging.

Research limitations/implications

The biggest limitation to this study is the fact that this was a small sample, without a control group. A further limitation is that it was difficult to get students to participate in the study. Future research might examine peer mentoring experiences of first generation students on larger campuses or on multiple campuses to allow for a control group of first generation peers without a peer mentoring experience.

Practical implications

The results indicated that peer mentoring experiences can be beneficial for the mentors who are first generation college students, even experiences that are particularly challenging.

Social implications

Due to the potential for their success, these types of experiences should be expanded for first generation students, a group that is at a higher risk for drop out. Special attention should be paid to ongoing training in peer mentoring experiences, given the level of commitment by the mentors.

Originality/value

While other studies have examined the impact of peer mentoring on those that have been mentored, and a few have examined the impact of the experience on the mentors themselves this study extends the research by looking at first generation college students. This is valuable because first generation students continue to lag in their success in college and practical research on what can improve the student experience for this group is necessary.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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