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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2010

Jamie D. Collins, William J. Worthington, Pedro M. Reyes and Marisabel Romero

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual overview of the relationship between knowledge management, supply chain technology investments, and overall firm…

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4472

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual overview of the relationship between knowledge management, supply chain technology investments, and overall firm performance. Additionally, a historical review of supply chain development is offered along with a comprehensive list of supply chain measures currently in use and a discussion of how those measures align within the overall firm strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on knowledge management theory, the paper argues herein that the transitory nature of firm‐level differentiation and the ease with which competitors gain access to each others' business strategies demand that firms stay flexible. It is also argued that translating firm knowledge resources into useable knowledge management capabilities may enable firms to enhance their likelihood of competitive advantage.

Findings

Many leading firms drive towards new advantages through supply chain information capturing investments. By capturing data and mining that information, firms are better equipped to identify impending changes in the environment and to adjust their strategies accordingly.

Practical implications

Firms that have a developed sense of competiveness are more likely to capture and utilize the increased datum provided by IT investments and more likely to implement that knowledge in a way that leads to operational improvements. As firms pursue global markets, supply chain complexity grows exponentially. Firms will need to respond and operations managers will need to find ways to empirically measure their performance to find improvements. Every investment in supply technology should be driven by an understanding of the inextricably inter‐connectedness of knowledge management capabilities and the firm's ability to effectively implement its corporate strategies. By emphasizing the inter‐connection between knowledge management and supply chain technology investments, firms improve their potential for developing a competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique conceptual framework intended to aid researchers and managers develop a more thorough understanding of the linkages between knowledge management capabilities, supply chain technology investments, and overall firm performance.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Pamela J. Zelbst, Kenneth W. Green, Victor E. Sower and Pedro M. Reyes

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology utilization in manufacturing firms on manufacturing efficiency and…

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5902

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology utilization in manufacturing firms on manufacturing efficiency and effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Using systems theory as a basis, a RFID utilization and outcome(s) performance model was developed from the literature. Data from a sample of 155 manufacturers were collected and the model was assessed using a structural equation methodology.

Findings

Findings indicate that utilization of RFID technology leads to improved manufacturing efficiency and manufacturing effectiveness. Improvements in efficiency lead directly to improved organizational performance, and improvements in effectiveness lead directly to improved supply chain performance.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected during the growth stage of RFID technology adoption and were only collected from firms in the manufacturing sector. Results should be interpreted with these limitations in mind.

Practical implications

The implementation of RFID technology can result in improved manufacturing efficiency and effectiveness. Practitioners considering adoption of the technology should fully account for these potential efficiency and effectiveness related benefits when determining the justification for adoption of this technology.

Originality/value

The paper describes one of the first empirically‐based studies investigating the impact of RFID technology implementation on supply chain and organizational performance in manufacturing organizations.

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Pedro M. Reyes and Patrick Jaska

The purpose of this paper is to help managers determine whether RFID is appropriate for their particular organizational needs and to give them some guidelines for…

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4458

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to help managers determine whether RFID is appropriate for their particular organizational needs and to give them some guidelines for implementing an RFID solution.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a general review of RFID and offers instructions to managers who are in a dilemma as to whether RFID is right for their organization or application.

Findings

The results of this study provide managers with procedures to follow that will enable them to minimize RFID implementation problems.

Practical implications

For practicing managers, these implementation procedures have important implications. As with any technological implementation, the needs of the organization, its personnel, and customers must be at the forefront of the process.

Originality/value

This paper offers managers a valuable perspective on the RFID implementation process for their organization.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Pedro M. Reyes, William J. Worthington and Jamie D. Collins

The purpose of this study is to explore the investment of supply chain technology-to-performance path relationship through the lens of the resource-based view (RBV) as…

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1877

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the investment of supply chain technology-to-performance path relationship through the lens of the resource-based view (RBV) as illuminated by the organizational learning literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed top-level managers who are registered members of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals.

Findings

Using factor analysis and OLS regression on 300+ supply chain professionals, this study confirms that investments in both enterprise- and radio frequency identification (RFID)-specific knowledge management (KM) tools yield substantial benefits to the firm’s knowledge management system (KMS) which is the dependent path to higher supply chain performance.

Research limitations/implications

This sample was taken with supply chain professionals who are more likely to value supply chain investments as part of their responsibility.

Practical implications

The authors believe that the empirical study on supply chain investment from a resource-based perspective will contribute to the ongoing RBV theoretical discussions while providing insights for practitioners in the realm of supply chain investment.

Originality/value

Every investment in supply technology should be driven by an understanding of the inextricably inter-connectedness of knowledge management capabilities and the firm’s ability to effectively implement its corporate strategies. By emphasizing the inter-connection between knowledge management and supply chain technology investments, firms improve their potential for developing a competitive advantage.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2010

Chris K. Zane and Pedro M. Reyes

The purpose of this paper is to test the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) for improving track and trace of the luggage handling process and to determine…

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1747

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) for improving track and trace of the luggage handling process and to determine potential decreases in operational costs of airports, namely through reduced baggage sorting expenses.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was designed to test the feasibility of implementing a RFID‐based tracking system and to determine the practicality and the technical hurdles which must be addressed.

Findings

RFID‐optimized airline value chains can improve efficiencies through adaptive load planning, whereby luggage can be loaded onto aircraft based on final destination and reduce manual sorting.

Research limitations/implications

The experiment was tested in a small regional airport.

Practical implications

RFID allows for synchronous communication through the value chain, enabling airlines to proactively determine if departing aircraft contain the appropriately checked luggage.

Originality/value

As customers become more price elastic, the firm must improve its abilities to meet the travel flexibility requirement and provide value added services to customers. RFID can expedite value chains by removing human induced variability and manual sorting, while improving accuracy and providing a heightened awareness of the logistics system.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Alan R. Cannon, Pedro M. Reyes, Gregory V. Frazier and Edmund L. Prater

This paper aims to point to established theory bases from other disciplines that may be used to illustrate the benefits, complexities and risks accompanying the adoption…

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4259

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to point to established theory bases from other disciplines that may be used to illustrate the benefits, complexities and risks accompanying the adoption of radio‐frequency identification (RFID) technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Three theory streams are explored with respect to RFID adoption at two levels: the level of the tagged unit; and the level of the adopting firm. Each theory stream is evaluated specifically with respect to RFID, and research questions are proposed.

Findings

A variety of theoretical disciplines bring to light tension between uncertainty that spurs RFID adoption and uncertainty that accompanies RFID adoption.

Practical implications

Insights are provided for managers wrestling with: the question of whether and/or how to adopt RFID; or concerns regarding the implications of their decision to adopt RFID. In addition, the theory bases explored in this research offer guidance regarding risks that accompany RFID adoption but are not commonly considered.

Originality/value

For those contemplating adoption of, or research into, RFID technology, the paper offers a detailed synthesis of valuable theory streams, as well as promising research questions.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

John K. Visich, Suhong Li, Basheer M. Khumawala and Pedro M. Reyes

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the actual benefits of radio frequency identification (RFID) on supply chain performance through the empirical evidence.

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6365

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the actual benefits of radio frequency identification (RFID) on supply chain performance through the empirical evidence.

Design/methodology/approach

The research reviews and classifies the existing quantitative empirical evidence of RFID on supply chain performance. The evidence is classified by process (operational or managerial) and for each process by effect (automational, informational, and transformational).

Findings

The empirical evidence shows that the major effects from the implementation of RFID are automational effects on operational processes followed by informational effects on managerial processes. The RFID implementation has not reached transformational level on either operational or managerial processes. RFID has an automational effect on operational processes through inventory control and efficiency improvements. An informational effect for managerial processes is observed for improved decision quality, production control and the effectiveness of retail sales and promotions coordination. In addition, a three‐stage model is proposed to explain the effects of RFID on the supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this research include the use of secondary sources and the lack of consistency in performance measure definitions. Future research could focus on detailed case studies that investigate cross‐functional applications across the organization and the supply chain.

Practical implications

For managers, the empirical evidence presented can help them identify implementation areas where RFID can have the greatest impact. The data can be used to build the business case for RFID and therefore better estimate ROI and the payback period.

Originality/value

This research fills a void in the literature by providing practitioners and researchers with a better understanding of the quantitative benefits of RFID in the supply chain.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Pedro M. Reyes

To describe how the well‐known Shapley Value concept from cooperative game theory can be used as an approach to solve the transshipment problem.

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4594

Abstract

Purpose

To describe how the well‐known Shapley Value concept from cooperative game theory can be used as an approach to solve the transshipment problem.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a numerical example for a three‐person game in a non‐cooperative environment, a selected cooperative environment, and a fully cooperative environment. The well‐known Shapely Value concept from cooperative game theory is used as an approach to solve the transshipment problem and show “how” the pooling coalitions should be formed. The appurtenance of the Shapley Value is verified to ensure that a stable solution exists.

Findings

The primary focus of this paper is to describe how the well‐known Shapley Value concept from cooperative game theory can be used as an approach to solve the transshipment problem and show “how” the pooling coalitions should be formed.

Research limitations/implications

While pooling coalitions are presented, this paper does not discuss revenue sharing.

Practical implications

This paper helps students understand “how to” make the right decisions about where they want to position themselves with respect to supply chain strategies.

Originality/value

The principal contribution of this approach is for establishing a pooling coalition in order to provide a more stable and cooperative solution. This paper also presents application to recent supply chain management business scenarios found in industry.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Edmund Prater, Gregory V. Frazier and Pedro M. Reyes

To place the research on radio frequency identification (RFID) usage in supply chains within a specific business and market context; in this case, the grocery industry.

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14922

Abstract

Purpose

To place the research on radio frequency identification (RFID) usage in supply chains within a specific business and market context; in this case, the grocery industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers RFID research within the context of the grocery industry and outlines the market drivers that affect the way the grocery industry approaches RFID and also specific areas of research on RFID that should be undertaken to better provide the grocery industry with managerial insights into this technology's application.

Findings

Examining market drivers that are leading to RFID implementation in the grocery industry, this paper provides a theoretical framework for future applied research on RFID implementation. Specifically, it develops a research framework that includes research using modeling techniques, RFID implementation and the impact of RFID on daily operational issues.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on the market drivers for RFID implementation. While it does address other areas that are related to research in this field, it is limited in its ability to go into detailed discussion of those areas. For example, while technology implementation and innovation diffusion issues are raised, they are detailed research domains of their own which can only be superficially addressed in the context of this paper.

Practical implications

The paper provides a detailed framework of research areas that are of direct, practical importance to the grocery industry. This should encourage research into this area, for, as researchers provide insights into these issues, the grocery industry can immediately put the findings into practice.

Originality/value

RFID has garnered a great deal of research interest. However, that research has primarily focused on RFID's impact on general supply chain issues, failing to place the discussion within a specific business domain. This is necessary because the strategic environment of any business impacts on the applicability of any technology.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Downloads
1212

Abstract

Details

Management Research News, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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