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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Patrick O’Sullivan

This paper aims to provide a brief overview of the anti-money laundering (AML) failings documented by the US Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations found in Hong Kong…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a brief overview of the anti-money laundering (AML) failings documented by the US Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations found in Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation (HSBC) Mexico. This paper focuses in on the key areas of concern raised by the 2012 report in respect of HSBC Mexico (HBMX) such as failure to undertake correct customer due diligence on high risk customers and repeated failings by senior management at HBMX to remedy these problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The relevant parts of the Subcommittee report relating to HBMX were examined along with the evidence submitted to the Subcommittee. From this examination, the author then noted the key examples of AML failings at HBMX and then commented on these examples while also referring to academic and regulatory guidance such as that from Financial Action Task Force.

Findings

Certain proposals are made throughout the paper, but these remain only suggestive. The key point is that the failings evident in HBMX may very well arise in other institutions, and this paper proposes how these failings may be resolved.

Research limitations/implications

Research for this paper remained limited to second-source references such as the Subcommittee report and the listed Exhibits along with other academic resources. The paper was also peer reviewed by a compliance officer. However, examining the paper from a more practical viewpoint may have struck a better balance between an optimal and realistic level of compliance.

Practical implications

Adopting an analytic approach to the subject of AML controls should aid those who work in compliance daily while also generating further commentary among both regulators and senior management within financial institutions.

Originality/value

The paper is the only one to date to focus on one geographical strand of the AML failings at HSBC and then comment on this from an academic perspective.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2021

Pedro Cuesta-Valiño, Pablo Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, María-Pilar Sierra-Fernández and María-Belén Aguirre García

This study analyses the dimensions of the brand equity of organic agri-food products using a multidimensional approach. It also examines the direct and indirect…

Abstract

Purpose

This study analyses the dimensions of the brand equity of organic agri-food products using a multidimensional approach. It also examines the direct and indirect relationships of this brand equity with consumers’ green satisfaction and the green image of organic agri-food products. The green brand can be understood as a tool for entrepreneurial development.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers develop a conceptual framework highlighting the dimensions of the green brand equity focusing on five constructs (green brand loyalty, green perceived quality, green brand associations, green brand awareness and the new dimension of green brand emotion), green satisfaction and green brand image. The sample consisted of 392 people aged over 18 who were occasional or habitual consumers of organic agri-food products. Partial least squares (PLS), a structural equation modelling (SEM) tool, was used in the analyses.

Findings

The results of this study show that the different dimensions of green brand equity (except for green brand awareness) reflect this variable and are important factors in its perception by consumers. This study differs from others in that it treats green brand equity as a truly multidimensional variable made up of different dimensions with different measurement scales. The study also demonstrates the importance of green satisfaction and green brand image as antecedents of green brand equity.

Practical implications

The measurement scale for green brand equity developed in this study provides entrepreneurs of organic agri-foods with a method for evaluating consumer perception of green brand equity based on those dimensions that are truly significant.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the relationships of green brand equity—as a multidimensional concept—with other variables, such as green satisfaction and green image.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Patricia S. Sánchez-Medina

Businesses in Mexico, particularly small and mid-sized companies, are faced with numerous challenges: a lack of competition, difficulty in positioning and maintaining…

Abstract

Purpose

Businesses in Mexico, particularly small and mid-sized companies, are faced with numerous challenges: a lack of competition, difficulty in positioning and maintaining oneself in the market, irrational use of natural resources, and poverty in the environment in which they develop. In spite of these problems, many are able to succeed; however, there is limited knowledge about how these businesses could implement organizational changes that would positively impact their results.

Design/methodology/approach

Using dynamic capabilities theory and survey data obtained from pottery businesses in several artisan communities in Mexico through the application of face-to-face interviews, this paper analyzes the relationship between organizational capability for change (OCC) and economic and environmental performance.

Findings

This research proves that OCC positively and significantly impacts economic and environmental performance. Results contribute to the existing literature on OCC in the context of poverty.

Originality/value

This study offers empirical research that illustrates the relationship between OCC and the environmental and economic performance of pottery businesses. Additionally it contributes to a field of knowledge in progress; that is, OCC in contexts of subsistence where poverty is a constant issue. Artisans living in this context can also develop business capabilities that contribute to the permanence of their business in the market.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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