Search results

1 – 10 of 431
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Keeley J. Pratt, Angela L. Lamson, Suzanne Lazorick, Carmel Parker White, David N. Collier, Mark B. White and Melvin S. Swanson

This review paper seeks to conceptualise childhood obesity through clinical, operational, and financial procedures. It informs multiple disciplines about: the trajectory…

Abstract

Purpose

This review paper seeks to conceptualise childhood obesity through clinical, operational, and financial procedures. It informs multiple disciplines about: the trajectory of paediatric obesity and current recommendations; the trends in the clinical, administrative/policy and financial worlds of paediatric obesity; and discusses commonly misunderstood collaborative terms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on analysis of national and international policy documents and research papers in the field.

Findings

Paediatric obesity treatment teams, programmes, and providers could all benefit from a document that bridges the disciplines of medicine, other professions, and financial management. A family centred, multidisciplinary approach is necessary at all stages of obesity treatment care and the three‐world model discussed is helpful in achieving this. The clinical, operational, and financial aspects of the service need to be integrated in a way that reduces the barriers to accessing services.

Originality/value

The paper combines perspectives from different service sectors: clinical, operational, and financial. To facilitate interdisciplinary cooperation, it offers common definitions of terms that often have different meanings for those involved.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 October 2008

Dimitrios Papandreou, Pavlos Malindretos and Israel Rousso

The aim of this study is to record the prevalence of overweight and obesity and to explore any relationship with nutritional status in Greek children aged 6‐15 years.

Downloads
810

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to record the prevalence of overweight and obesity and to explore any relationship with nutritional status in Greek children aged 6‐15 years.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 524 children participated in the study. Anthropometric and dietary characteristics were recorded for all subjects.

Findings

The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 21.1 per cent and 8.4 per cent for boys and 17.6 and 7.3 per cent for girls, respectively. Dietary intakes of energy, fat, protein, lipids and sugar were higher in overweight and obese children compared with the normal ones ( p < 0.001), while fibre intake was lower in the overweight and obese group ( p < 0.001) than in the normal group. The current study gives an estimation of overweight and obesity in children from Northern Greece. The composition of diet, especially low in fibre, vitamin D and high in energy and fat may play a role in the etiology of obesity.

Originality/value

The paper presents information on obesity prevalence in a Mediterranean country as well as integration of some nutrients in the etiology of obesity.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

Waraporn Khumros, Arnond Vorayingyong, Siriluck Suppapitiporn, Thanapoom Rattananupong and Vitool Lohsoonthorn

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of a modified HBM-based intervention to reduce body mass index (BMI) for age in overweight junior high school students.

Downloads
3158

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of a modified HBM-based intervention to reduce body mass index (BMI) for age in overweight junior high school students.

Design/methodology/approach

A cluster-randomized controlled trial was conducted in the first and second years of a junior high school in the center of Thailand. In total, 24 classrooms were randomly assigned to a modified health belief model intervention arm (HBMIA), and 24 classrooms were randomly assigned to a traditional school health education arm (control). In total, 479 students who were overweight (BMI forage = median +1 SD, aged 12–15 years) participated in the study. The HBMIA used the health belief model (HBM) as a motivator for behavioral strategies that included modifying diet and participating in physical activity. BMI, health knowledge and behavior for preventing obesity were recorded at baseline and at six months. A multilevel regression model was performed to calculate mean difference between HBMIA and control group.

Findings

The students who participated in the HBMIA showed a decrease in BMI of 1.76 kg/m2, while those who participated in the control showed an increase in BMI of 1.13 kg/m2, with a mean difference of –2.88 kg/m2 (95% CI =–3.01 to –2.75), an improvement in health knowledge (mean difference 27.28; 95% CI =26.15–28.41) and an improvement in health behavior (mean difference 23.54; 95% CI =22.60–24.48).

Originality/value

A modified HBM-based intervention to reduce BMI for age is effective in overweight junior high school students.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2586-940X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Laurens Holmes, Sequoia Jackson, Alexandra LaHurd, Pat Oceanic, Kelli Grant and Kirk Dabney

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of obesity/overweight using higher body mass index (BMI), assess racial/ethnic variance in overweight/obese…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of obesity/overweight using higher body mass index (BMI), assess racial/ethnic variance in overweight/obese prevalence, and to determine whether or not insurance status explains the variance.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional design was used to assess medical records of children in Nemours Healthcare System during 2011. The authors reviewed the records and extracted information on normal BMI, BMI percent, higher BMI, prevalence of overweight/obese and other variables as well as race and ethnicity. χ2 statistic, Fischer's exact and logistic regression model were used to examine the data.

Findings

Overall, the prevalence of higher BMI as overweight/obese was comparable to that of the US pediatric population, 33.4 percent. Compared to Caucasian/white, Asians were less likely to have higher BMI, prevalence odd ratio (POR)=0.79, 95 percent CI=0.70-0.90, but Blacks/African Americans (POR=1.22, 95 percent CI=1.18-1.27) and Some other Race were more likely to have higher BMI, POR=1.61, 95 percent CI=1.92-1.71. After controlling for insurance status, the racial disparities in higher BMI persisted; p<0.0001.

Research limitations/implications

Racial/ethnic disparities exist in childhood higher BMI, which were not removed after controlling for insurance coverage as a surrogate for socioeconomic status. These findings are indicative of assessing sex, religious, dietary patterns, physical activities level, environmental resources, social media resources; and geographic locale as confounders in race/ethnicity and higher BMI association.

Originality/value

Understanding the predisposing factors to obesity/overweight among diverse populations is essential in developing and implementing intervention programs in addressing this epidemic in our nation.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Dimitrios Papandreou, Pavlos Malindretos and Israel Rousso

Waist circumference (WC) is a better predictor than total body fat for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and a sensitive marker of abdominal obesity for both…

Abstract

Purpose

Waist circumference (WC) is a better predictor than total body fat for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and a sensitive marker of abdominal obesity for both adults and children. The purpose of this paper is to provide, for the first time, percentile curves of WC in children from Thessaloniki, northern Greece.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 607 children (324 boys‐283 girls) aged 7‐15 years participated in the study. Sex‐specific descriptive statistics for three age groups (7‐9, 10‐12 and 13‐15) and smoothed percentiles curves of WC were derived and presented.

Findings

WC increased with age in both boys and girls. Boys had higher mean values of WC in two age groups (10‐12 and 13‐15 years) compared with girls, while girls showed a higher mean value in the age group of 7‐9 years compared with boys. Percentile levels were higher for girls above the 90th percentile for the age groups of 7‐9 and 10‐12 years. WC correlated closely with body mass index (BMI) (r = 0.90 vs 0.89, for boys and girls, respectively). Reference curves of WC were provided for the first time. Considering the lack of such reference curves and also the high incidence of pediatric obesity in northern Greece's children, the paper aims to help identify and prevent early obesity risk factors associated with high WC values.

Originality/value

The paper informs nutritionists and clinical dietitians of new data of percentile ranges regarding waist circumference in a pediatric population.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Alan M. Delamater, Adriana Guzman and Katherine Aparicio

The purpose of this paper is to consider mental health issues in children and adolescents with chronic illness or health conditions, including their treatment, and issues…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider mental health issues in children and adolescents with chronic illness or health conditions, including their treatment, and issues related to delivery of services.

Design/methodology/approach

A selective review of the literature was conducted to highlight significant mental health issues and their treatment in youth with various types of chronic illness.

Findings

A significant portion of youth experience mental health problems related to their chronic health conditions. While evidence-based treatments are available to address these problems, significant barriers exist that impede the delivery of psychological and behavioral interventions for many youth.

Research limitations/implications

More controlled studies are needed to demonstrate the effectiveness and cost offset of delivering psychological and behavioral interventions for the population of youth with various types of chronic health conditions, particularly in clinical and community settings.

Social implications

Policy reform can ensure that mental health issues are effectively addressed for children with chronic illness. Policy is needed that promotes integrated health care, whereby psychological and behavioral interventions are delivered in health care settings along with medical interventions to reduce barriers to care.

Originality/value

Significant numbers of children and adolescents have chronic health conditions and many experience mental health problems related to their conditions. While evidence-based treatments are available to address these problems, significant barriers impede the delivery of psychological and behavioral interventions for many youth. Health care policy promoting integrated health care to deliver psychological and behavioral interventions in health care settings along with medical interventions should reduce barriers to care and improve both physical and mental health outcomes for youth.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Stacia Maher, Patricia Lopez, M. Diane McKee, Darwin Deen, Alice Fornari, Jason Fletcher and Arthur Blank

The paper aims to evaluate a primary care obesity prevention intervention, targeting low‐income minority parents in the USA. The first objective is to describe the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to evaluate a primary care obesity prevention intervention, targeting low‐income minority parents in the USA. The first objective is to describe the barriers to behavior change experienced by families. The second objective is to understand the types of strategies that were used by the health educator to empower families to engage in healthy behavior changes.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methods were used to conduct a content analysis of the intervention's instruments and health educator's notes on counseling sessions. Demographic data were collected from the patient information system.

Findings

Households were 80 percent Hispanic and 17 percent African American. A total of 26 percent of the children were overweight or obese. Themes identified were poor parenting skills, which included sub themes of picky eating, food‐related tantrums, bottle feeding, and submitting to unhealthy food requests; poor knowledge and skills regarding healthy eating; and psycho/social issues acting as barriers to healthy eating, including sub themes of housing issues, parental unemployment and intergenerational conflict regarding food choices.

Originality/value

There are few family‐based obesity prevention interventions, especially in low‐income minority communities. This study found that parents are interested in improving the intake of healthy foods for their families; however, they face substantial barriers. This study supports enhanced health assessment as part of the preschool preventive visit. The authors also found that a skilled, culturally competent, health educator is essential to extend counseling beyond the brief encounter with physicians, as well as advocacy for systematic and policy level changes, to address the complex context in which behavior change can occur.

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Didde Hoeeg, Dan Grabowski and Ulla Christensen

To treat childhood obesity, health education interventions are often aimed at the whole family. However, such interventions seem to have a relatively limited effect on…

Abstract

Purpose

To treat childhood obesity, health education interventions are often aimed at the whole family. However, such interventions seem to have a relatively limited effect on weight loss. The purpose of this paper is to examine how families enrolled in a family-based health education intervention manage the intervention in their daily lives and to understand how and why intra-familial conflicts may occur.

Design/methodology/approach

Data consist of 10 in-depth semi-structured family interviews with 25 family members (10 children, 15 parents), who were enrolled in a family-based health education intervention for families with an obese child.

Findings

Actively involving all family members in the intervention proved difficult in many families. Often, the children experienced inconsistent family support, which led to intra-familial conflicts. When parents were unsuccessful in changing unhealthy habits, the responsibility for healthy living was often passed on to the obese child. Thus, several families managed the intervention by making specific rules that only the obese child was required to adhere to. This resulted in several children feeling stigmatized in their own family.

Practical implications

Professionals working with family-based health education interventions should understand that, in order to minimize the risk of intra-familial conflicts and stigmatization of the obese child, all family members must be equally committed to the lifestyle intervention.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing literature by adding specific knowledge about how and why conflicts occur in these families and what the consequences of these conflicts are.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2008

Isabelle Streng

This article focuses on group work with children using a board game format. Combining the principles of group work and board games helps to engage and motivate children…

Abstract

This article focuses on group work with children using a board game format. Combining the principles of group work and board games helps to engage and motivate children and adolescents to address and work through their difficulties. Lifegames are a series of six therapeutic board games developed for group work with children and adolescents who encounter adversity in their life as a consequence of bereavement, family break up, poor relationships, bullying, chronic illness or obesity. The games facilitate the understanding and disclosure of the complex feelings experienced by children and young people when they are confronted with traumatic life events. The games encourage and assist the participants to obtain and maintain behavioural change. Lifegames are a means to assist professionals in their group work with children and adolescents.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Gursevak S. Kasbia

With a global increase in the prevalence of obesity, nutrition and exercise play a key role in its prevention and treatment. Natural product (nutraceutical) interventions…

Downloads
3480

Abstract

Purpose

With a global increase in the prevalence of obesity, nutrition and exercise play a key role in its prevention and treatment. Natural product (nutraceutical) interventions are currently being investigated on a large‐scale basis as potential treatments for obesity and weight management. This paper aims to examine current research on nutraceuticals and their role in the management of obesity and body composition. This paper will focus specifically on nutraceuticals, which are plant‐based, which may aid in preventing/treating the metabolic syndrome. Those that will be discussed include conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), capsaicin, Momordica Charantia (MC) and Psyllium fibre.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent empirical evidence has suggested that the utilization of such nutraceuticals to treat human cases of the metabolic syndrome may indeed be warranted. By examining various databases and conducting literature searches the following herbs and food additives were found to be of significant importance within this realm of food science. More importantly, emphasis was placed on research which used the randomized placebo control design.

Findings

Whilst many of the nutraceuticals already have widespread usage, dosage and utilization have still not been critically examined in research literature. Many studies have focused solely on animal research, while others have implemented these nutraceuticals in controlled human trials.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst many journal articles met rigorous scientific standards, international research in this area has also revealed that, language barriers may exist. The field of clinical nutraceutical research is rel atively new in North America, and thus much information is still available in the East but barriers still exist with respect to knowledge of certain herbs.

Practical implications

Clinical nutritionists as well as physicians must gain knowledge of nutraceutical usage as well as availability. With recent marketing of products online, issues of safety should also be raised with respect to clinical treatment. Some products may have contra‐indicatory properties and thus further investigation with nutraceuticals and significant interactions with physician supervised treatment should also be evaluated in future research.

Originality/value

To date few papers have evaluated nutraceutical usage specifically clinical usage and, furthermore, the implications that some may have on obesity and treatment of the metabolic syndrome. Filling this gap in the literature may allow other researchers, clinicians and physicians to learn more about nutraceuticals.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

1 – 10 of 431