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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Christian Gadolin, Erik Eriksson and Patrik Alexandersson

The aim of this paper is to empirically describe and analyze factors deemed to be relevant for the successful provision of coordinated paediatric oncology care by…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to empirically describe and analyze factors deemed to be relevant for the successful provision of coordinated paediatric oncology care by physicians and nurses involved.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study primarily consisting of interviews.

Findings

The paper's findings indicate that certain factors (i.e. distinct mission, clear treatment protocols and support from external stakeholders) relevant for the provision of coordinated paediatric oncology care have not received sufficient attention in previous research. In addition, emphasis is placed on the necessity of facilitating constructive working relationships and a bottom-up perspective when pursuing improved care coordination.

Originality/value

The factors described and analyzed may act as insights for how paediatric oncology might be improved in terms of care coordination and thus facilitate care integration. In addition, the paper's findings identify factors relevant for further empirical studies in order to delineate their generalizability.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Kate Murphy and Sarah Governey

The purpose of this paper is to feedback the results of a survey of paediatric occupational therapists completed by the Paediatric Advisory Group (PAG) regarding…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to feedback the results of a survey of paediatric occupational therapists completed by the Paediatric Advisory Group (PAG) regarding perceptions and practices of the assessment of need (AON) process. This survey was completed to gather feedback from occupational therapists about the impact of the AON process on paediatric occupational therapy practice in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed by the authors, who were on the PAG committee, to specifically gather quantitative and qualitative information about the AON. A snowball sampling method was utilised. The results were grouped into themes related to the practices and recommendations from occupational therapists nationally.

Findings

Surveys were returned from 98 paediatric occupational therapists with a wide national geographical spread with the majority working in the HSE. The amount of time spent on AON assessments, as well as the length of reports, varied nationally. The process of how assessments were completed (unidisciplinary or multidisciplinary) and whether a diagnosis was provided was inconsistent. Concerns were raised about the negative ethical impact of the AON on service provision and intervention and the need for further training of staff along with more frequent assessment reviews. The respondents also highlighted concerns about the increasing age of the AON criteria, with no increase in resources, and they provided suggestions for improvements for the future.

Research limitations/implications

The survey was sent to all AOTI and PAG members via gatekeepers and then forwarded to others, resulting in a snowball sampling technique; however, this does not represent all paediatric occupational therapists nationally as membership in these groups is voluntary.

Practical implications

The concerns and inequities raised in the survey regarding occupational therapy practices of completing the AON process need to be shared with relevant stakeholders both at the occupational therapy management level and in the HSE and Department of Health/Disability. The PAG will continue to highlight these concerns from their members to relevant parties and by disseminating findings in articles such as this.

Social implications

Ethical concerns were raised by some members about the equity of access to interventions as a result of the AON process. The social implication of this for families and children is pertinent, particularly in the context of the increased age in the AON criteria without any increase in resources.

Originality/value

The PAG aims to support paediatric occupational therapists nationally and the committee often gathers feedback from members regarding concerns which affect day-to-day practice in paediatric OT. Sharing of this information with IJOT readers helps to highlight the challenges faced by paediatric occupational therapists nationally.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2011

Pamela Block, Eva L. Rodriguez, Maria C. Milazzo, William S. MacAllister, Lauren B. Krupp, Akemi Nishida, Nina Slota, Alyssa M. Broughton and Christopher B. Keys

Purpose – Researchers use the concept of biosociality and a disability studies framework of empowerment to present and analyze examples of community formation and…

Abstract

Purpose – Researchers use the concept of biosociality and a disability studies framework of empowerment to present and analyze examples of community formation and participation for youth with pediatric multiple sclerosis.

Methodology – The data were collected using participant observation, individual and focus group interviews during Teen Adventure Camps held in the summers of 2004–2009 and an Educational Transition Retreat held in the fall of 2008.

Findings – Evidence of community formation and identification include the development of formal and informal systems for mutual support and mentoring, as well as transformations in self-perception and collective identity. Challenges to community formation include differing perspectives about disability-pride vs. diagnosis-specific affiliations.

Research implications – This research indicates that there are many pathways to individual and community identification which may include and even intertwine both diagnosis-specific and disability-pride approaches. The process of community formation is transformative, thus preferences with regard to community identification should not be considered stable, but rather understood as a developmental process that may change over time.

Originality/value of paper – Building upon social and minority group theories, this research moved beyond social critique to develop and implement strategies for community development, individual, and group empowerment.

Details

Disability and Community
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-800-8

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2020

Michael Behan, Tanjila Nawshin, Samuel Nemanich, Jesse Kowalski, Ellen Sutter, Sunday Francis, Janet Dubinsky, Rebecca Freese, Kyle Rudser and Bernadette Gillick

Recruitment for pediatric non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) studies is often challenged by low enrollment. Understanding parental perceptions regarding NIBS is crucial…

Abstract

Purpose

Recruitment for pediatric non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) studies is often challenged by low enrollment. Understanding parental perceptions regarding NIBS is crucial to develop new communication strategies to increase enrollment.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrating a crossed-disciplinary approach, the authors conducted a survey at the 2018 Minnesota State Fair querying the perception of risk and preferences of current and future parents associated with pediatric NIBS research. The survey consisted of 28 closed-text questions including demographics, photographs portraying NIBS, terminologies and factors related to NIBS studies.

Findings

Complete surveys were analyzed from 622 parent participants. A significant number of participants (42.8%) perceived the photographs of NIBS as “risky.” Additionally, 65.43% perceived the term “Non-invasive brain therapy” as not risky, a word combination not currently being used when recruiting potential participants. Over 90% (561/622) of participants chose the photograph of child-friendly MRI suite.

Research limitations/implications

Although this survey identified aspects crucial in recruitment for pediatric NIBS research, there were limitations. For example, the authors did not record the sex or demographic distribution (e.g. rural versus urban setting) of the participants. These factors may also influence recruitment messaging.

Originality/value

For important medical research to impact and improve the lives of the potential remedies, participation by the public in clinical trials is necessary. Often the general public perceives the trials as risky as a result of poor marketing communication recruitment material. This study sought to be understood if how the message is encoded has an impact on the decoding by the receiver.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Daniel Stark, Sophie Thomas, David Dawson, Emily Talbot, Emily Bennett and Arleta Starza-Smith

Modern healthcare services are commonly based on shared models of care, in which a strong emphasis is placed upon the views of those in receipt of services. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Modern healthcare services are commonly based on shared models of care, in which a strong emphasis is placed upon the views of those in receipt of services. The purpose of this paper is to examine the parents’ experiences of their child’s neuropsychological assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a mixed-methodology study employing both quantitative and qualitative measures.

Findings

The questionnaire measure indicated a high overall level of satisfaction. Qualitative analysis of parental interviews provided a richer insight into the parental experience and indicated four major themes.

Practical implications

Implications covered three major areas. Firstly, whilst a high value was placed upon the assessment, the need for further comprehensive neurorehabilitation and intervention was highlighted. Secondly, this study highlights the significant adversity experienced by such families and subsequent unmet psychological needs which also require consideration. Finally, findings from the current study could assist in improving future measures of satisfaction in similar services.

Originality/value

This is the first published study of parental experiences of and satisfaction with paediatric neuropsychological assessment in the UK.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Alice Wang, Helena Pelletier, Diana Calligan, Angela Coates and Karen Allison Bailey

Nutrition plays a key role in the recovery of pediatric trauma patients. A catabolic state in trauma patients may hinder recovery and inadequate nutrition may increase…

Abstract

Purpose

Nutrition plays a key role in the recovery of pediatric trauma patients. A catabolic state in trauma patients may hinder recovery and inadequate nutrition may increase morbidity, mortality and length of hospital stay. The purpose of this paper is to review the current nutrition support practices for pediatric trauma patients at McMaster Children’s Hospital (MCH), describe patient demographics and identify areas to improve the quality of patient care.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective chart review was conducted on pediatric trauma patients (age<18 years) identified through the trauma registry of MCH. Pediatric trauma patients admitted from January 2010 to March 2014 with an Injury Severity Score (ISS)=12 and a hospitalization of =24 hours were included.

Findings

In total, 130 patients were included in this study, 61.1 percent male, median age ten years (range: 0-17 years) and median ISS of 17 (range: 12-50). Blunt trauma accounted for 97.7 percent of patients admitted and 73.3 percent had trauma team activation. In total, 93 patients (71.5 percent) had ICU stays. The median time to feed was 29 hours (interquartile range: 12.5-43 hours) from the time of admission. An increased hospital length of stay was associated with longer time to initiation of nutrition support, a higher ISS and greater number of surgeries (p<0.05).

Originality/value

Local nutritional support practices for pediatric trauma patients correspond with recommended principles of early feeding and preferential enteral nutrition. Harmonization of paper-based and electronic data collection is recommended to ensure that prescribed nutritional support is being delivered and nutritional needs of pediatric trauma patients are being met.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Byungjoon B.J. Kim, Theodore R. Delbridge and Dawn B. Kendrick

Overcrowding in emergency departments (EDs) leads to longer waiting times and results in higher number of patients leaving the ED without being seen by a physician. EDs…

Abstract

Purpose

Overcrowding in emergency departments (EDs) leads to longer waiting times and results in higher number of patients leaving the ED without being seen by a physician. EDs need to improve quality for patients’ waiting time and length of stay (LoS) from the perspective of process and flow control management. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The retrospective case study was performed using the computerized ED patient time logs from arrival to discharge between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010. Patients were divided into two groups either adult or pediatric with a cutoff age of 18. Patients’ characteristics were measured by arrival time periods, waiting times before being seen by a physician, total LoS and acuity levels. A discrete event simulation was applied to the comparison of quality performance measures.

Findings

Statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in terms of arrival times, acuity levels, waiting time stratified for various arrival times and acuity levels. The process quality for pediatric patients could be improved by redesign of patient flow management and medical resource.

Research limitations/implications

The results are limited to a case of one community and ED. This study did not analyze the characteristic of leaving the ED without being seen by a physician.

Practical implications

Separation of pediatric patients from adult patients in an ED can reduce the waiting time before being seen by a physician and the total staying time in the ED for pediatric patients. It can also lessen the chances for pediatric patients to leave the ED without being seen by a physician.

Originality/value

A process and flow control management scheme based on patient group characteristics may improve service quality and lead to a better patient satisfaction in ED.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 August 2011

Renee Hosang

Purpose – This chapter has three major points. First, I present the legal context that guides pediatric clinical interactions in the United States. Second, I argue that…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter has three major points. First, I present the legal context that guides pediatric clinical interactions in the United States. Second, I argue that pediatric care is incomplete if the child patient is not identified as a knowledgeable and serious resource, thereby illustrating the concept called child inclusion. Third, it recognizes the child as a research participant.

Methodology – This chapter will present an argument for the concept of child inclusion by presenting limited data from research at a private clinic in the state of Florida, USA. It will present recommendations for the inclusion of children in the pediatric setting and comment on the child-centered method used for this research. The concept of child inclusion acknowledges the agency of a child in health care and places the child at the forefront of research. It presents qualitative data from ongoing research on indicators for child inclusion in a pediatric clinical setting, assuming that such indicators can only manifest in a partnership model of clinical interaction, where physician authority does not dominate clinical care and patients are actively involved in the negotiation of their health care.

Findings – I present recommendations for the inclusion of children in the pediatric setting and comment on the child-centered method used for this research. The concept of child inclusion acknowledges the agency of a child in health care and places the child at the forefront of research. This work calls for the child to no longer be in the background of pediatric care and social science research.

Details

The Well-Being, Peer Cultures and Rights of Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-075-9

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Ellen Belitzky, Christian Bach and Erika Belitzky

This study aims to understand how healthcare social media offer nonmedical psycho-social support for pediatric oncology patients and their care community and how social…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand how healthcare social media offer nonmedical psycho-social support for pediatric oncology patients and their care community and how social media can be exploited for healthcare knowledge management.

Design/methodology/approach

Social media capabilities were identified and categorized based on psycho-social support services for pediatric oncology patients, caregivers and their community of care. Data were collected from 187 service sites representing more than 100 organizations. These broadly defined capabilities in trusted care organizations were analyzed to understand use of social media in providing psycho-social support.

Findings

Analysis revealed resource guides, stories and in-person support at clinics as the most prevalent forms of technology-guided psycho-social support. Privacy, security and information integrity rose as technical challenges for interactive social media platforms. Medical community trust is inconsistent, leading to immature adoption of critical psycho-social support as a knowledge management source. Findings further indicate the not-for-profit support sector provides robust social media capabilities compared to the healthcare sector.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may extend to maturing healthcare and not-for-profit sector services and to private sector products such as mobile applications and other technologies.

Practical implications

Survivor and caregiver quality of life depend on psycho-social support communities and services delivered via social media.

Social implications

Child protection social implications require significant attention due to sensitivity of security, privacy concerns and longevity of digital footprints for pediatric patients.

Originality/value

Research demonstrates opportunity for medical provider, healthcare organization, not-for-profit sector, patient and caregiver cooperation using social media. Data indicate healthcare technology systems leveraging social media can extend knowledge management capability beyond organization boundaries.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

K. Banu Priya, P. Rajendran, Sandeep Kumar M., Prabhu J., Sukumar Rajendran, P.J. Kumar, Thanapal P., Jabez Christopher and Jothikumar R.

The computational model proposed in this work uses the data's of COVID-19 cases in India. From the analysis, it can be observed that the proposed immunity model decides…

Abstract

Purpose

The computational model proposed in this work uses the data's of COVID-19 cases in India. From the analysis, it can be observed that the proposed immunity model decides the recovery rate of COVID −19 patients; moreover, the recovery rate does not depend on the age of the patients. These analytic models can be used by public health professionals, hospital administrators and epidemiologists for strategic decision-making to enhance health requirements based on various demographic and social factors of those affected by the pandemic. Mobile-based computational model can be used to compute the travel history of the affected people by accessing the near geographical maps of the path traveled.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors developed a pediatric and geriatric person’s immunity network-based mobile computational model for COVID-19 patients. As the computational model is hard to analyze mathematically, the authors simplified the computational model as general COVID-19 infected people, the computational immunity model. The model proposed in this work used the data's of COVID-19 cases in India.

Findings

This study proposes a pediatric and geriatric people immunity network model for COVID- 19 patients. For the analysis part, the data's on COVID-19 cases in India was used. In this model, the authors have taken two sets of people (pediatric and geriatric), both are facing common symptoms such as fever, cough and myalgia. From the analysis, it was observed and also proved that the immunity level of patients decides the recovery rate of COVID-19 patients and the age of COVID-19 patients has no significant influence on the recovery rate of the patient.

Originality/value

COVID-19 has created a global health crisis that has had a deep impact on the way we perceive our world and our everyday lives. Not only the rate of contagion and patterns of transmission threatens our sense of agency, but the safety measures put in place to contain the spread of the virus also require social distancing. The novel model in this work focus on the Indian scenario and thereby may help Indian health organizations for future planning and organization. The factors model in this work such as age, immunity level, recovery rate can be used by machine leaning models for predicting other useful outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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