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1 – 10 of over 14000
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Jörgen Holmberg, Göran Fransson and Uno Fors

The purpose of this paper is to advance the understanding of teachers’ reframing of practice in digital contexts by analysing teachers’ pedagogical reasoning processes as…

1100

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance the understanding of teachers’ reframing of practice in digital contexts by analysing teachers’ pedagogical reasoning processes as they explore ways of using information and communication technologies (ICT) to create added pedagogical value.

Design/methodology/approach

A design-based research (DBR) approach is employed, in which the on-site researcher collaborates with eight teachers of English as a foreign language in four Swedish schools over a period of two years. Multiple data sources are included for thematic coding and analysis. The technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) framework is used as a conceptual construct in the analysis.

Findings

The findings show that teachers’ pedagogical reasoning is a complex and multidimensional process and is closely integrated with teachers’ reframing of practice. Common characteristics in the teachers’ reframing of practice are identified. The results highlight the reciprocal relationship between developments in teachers’ pedagogical reasoning and TPACK development and the need for a distinction between general and specific, theoretical and practical TPACK.

Research limitations/implications

An increased focus on TPACK research on teachers’ pedagogical reasoning is required. DBR is a relevant approach for this.

Practical implications

The pedagogical uses of ICT identified as adding value could benefit teachers in other contexts.

Originality/value

Rich data from multiple design contexts are collected and analysed over time through DBR. The paper contributes new knowledge about the process of pedagogical reasoning and its relation to teachers’ reframing of practice. The paper also contributes to TPACK theory development.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Shironica P. Karunanayaka and Som Naidu

A critical attribute of open educational practices (OEP) is the pursuit of open scholarship which comprises the release of educational resources under an open licence…

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Abstract

Purpose

A critical attribute of open educational practices (OEP) is the pursuit of open scholarship which comprises the release of educational resources under an open licence scheme that permits no-cost access, use, reuse, adaptation, retention and redistribution to others. The degree of openness in relation to this attribute will depend on the context and culture of the place and the people in it. When left to chance, the adoption and practice of open scholarship by educators is at best sketchy. For optimum impact, a design-based approach is essential. A central focus of such an approach will need to target educators’ belief systems and practices about their scholarship. Any such work will involve researchers collaborating with practitioners in real-life settings to improve educational practices through iterative analysis, design, development and implementation. The purpose of this paper is to report on how the development and use of such a design-based approach, implemented by the Open University of Sri Lanka, impacted the adoption and uptake of open scholarship among teachers in the Sri Lankan school system in terms of changes in their use of instructional resources, pedagogical thinking and pedagogical practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a design-based research (DBR) approach (Reeves, 2006), which involved researchers collaboratively working with practitioners in real-life settings to improve their educational practices along three aspects – instructional resource use, pedagogical perspectives and pedagogical practices. Based on the four stages of the DBR approach – analysis, solution, testing and refinement, and reflection, a professional development intervention programme was designed and implemented to support teachers on the integration of open educational resources (OER) and adoption of OEP in their teaching-learning process. Data collected throughout the process using multiple strategies such as questionnaire surveys, concept mapping, lesson plans, focus group interviews, self-reflections and “stories”, were analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methods.

Findings

By the end of the intervention, significant changes were observed in teachers’ use of instructional resources, their pedagogical thinking and pedagogical practices. While resource usage has shifted from no or low usage of OER to reuse, revise, remix and creation of OER, the pedagogical thinking and practices of teachers moved from a content-centric and individualized patterns to more constructivist, context centric and collaborative ways. The diffusion of OEP was prominent along two dimensions – enhancements in the individual practices in innovative OER use as well as collaborative practices of sharing of resources, knowledge and good practices.

Practical implications

The systematic and flexible methodology adopted based on the DBR approach via a framework designed as a contextualized, process oriented and a self-reflective enquiry has been very useful to support changes in OEP among practitioners over time.

Originality/value

This iterative process allowed the researchers to function as “designers”, while investigating real-life issues in collaboration with the practitioners through reflective enquiry to further refine innovative practices towards OEP. This provides valuable insights for improved design solutions for future interventions in similar contexts.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Marjo Susanna Joshi

The purpose of this paper is to present design principles for holistic design of online degree programmes (ODPs) in higher education (HE). The study adds to previous…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present design principles for holistic design of online degree programmes (ODPs) in higher education (HE). The study adds to previous research on online programme design by examining how the digital competence and pedagogical strategy of a HE organisation can inform holistic ODP design.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study placed in the context of a Finnish applied HE organisation. Design-based research (DBR) process is used to create holistic design principles for new ODPs. Theoretical framework for the study is digitally competent organisation (Kampylis et al., 2015) and pedagogical strategy is innovation pedagogy (Kettunen et al., 2013).

Findings

Design principles for pedagogically informed holistic design of ODPs are presented as a three-tiered model comprising organisational, pedagogical and ODP layers. Each layer includes various principles for holistic design to integrate an organisation's pedagogical strategy in a digitally competent context to create quality ODPs.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a case study from a HE organisation in Finland, but results are applicable to a wider global audience.

Practical implications

As a contribution to practitioners, this paper presents a three-tiered holistic design of ODP in HE organisation, where the design principles are categorised in organisational, pedagogical and ODP design layers. In addition, suggestions to managers, instructional designers and educators are made for the holistic design of ODPs.

Social implications

Building the sense of community in ODPs and offering continuous support in pedagogy and technology are valuable for the well-being of the staff, students and the wider society.

Originality/value

The paper draws relationships between holistic design of ODPs, digital competence and pedagogical strategy. The paper provides managerial and operational viewpoints to managers, administrators and educators of HE organisations that plan to create new ODPs with a holistic focus on the educational organisation, its pedagogical strategy and digital competence. Recommendations for further development, possible applications and research of ODP education are made.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2015

Ryan M. Rish and Audra Slocum

To present a cross-case analysis of two pre-service teachers who studied their own teaching using video within a teacher inquiry project (TIP) – a teacher education…

Abstract

Purpose

To present a cross-case analysis of two pre-service teachers who studied their own teaching using video within a teacher inquiry project (TIP) – a teacher education pedagogy we are calling video-mediated teacher inquiry.

Methodology/approach

Activity theory is used to examine how inquiry groups collaboratively used video to mediate shifts in goals and tool use for the two pre-service teachers presented in the study. This chapter addresses the question of how video-mediated teacher inquiry supports the appropriation of teaching tools (i.e., classroom discussion) in a teacher education program.

Findings

The findings indicate that shifts in goals and tool use made during the TIP suggest greater appropriation of the pedagogical tool of classroom discussion. We also consider how these shifts may be bound by the inquiry project.

Practical implications

The use of video cases of teachers’ own teaching is an emergent pedagogy that combines elements of both case study methods and practitioner inquiry. We argue that this pedagogy supports tool appropriation among pre-service teachers in ways that may help them develop as reflective practitioners.

Details

Video Reflection in Literacy Teacher Education and Development: Lessons from Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-676-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Gonca Kizilkaya and Petek Askar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of an embedded pedagogical agent into a tutorial on achievement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of an embedded pedagogical agent into a tutorial on achievement.

Design/methodology/approach

Research methodology is designed according to the post test control group model in which the experimental group (69 students) was exposed to a tutorial with an embedded pedagogical agent; control group (56 students) was exposed to the same tutorial without a pedagogical agent. The tutorial was developed by the researchers as educational software on the unit “Discovering Space” for 6th graders.

Findings

The data analysis showed that the experimental group performed significantly better than the control group which indicated that using a pedagogical agent in a tutorial has a positive effect on the achievement. Another finding related to the gender differences is that girls performed better than the boys.

Research limitations/implications

This research has some implications for designing educational software. Embedded pedagogical agent is improving learning by providing interaction and motivational support. So designers must take in consideration of using animated pedagogical agent in educational software. The long‐term effects of interaction were not explored in this study.

Practical implications

It is important to choose a suitable agent according to domain and age group. The case of “whether the pedagogical interface agent should be intelligent or not” is also a subject open to debate. Intelligent agent holds the behavior of learner and adapts itself specifically to the learner.

Originality/value

This research has original value for instructional designers and educational software developers. Also this research has contributed to human–computer interaction domain.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Bongani D. Bantwini

This chapter discusses whether or not there is congruence between the assessment and pedagogical approaches used when teaching natural science and technology education in…

Abstract

This chapter discusses whether or not there is congruence between the assessment and pedagogical approaches used when teaching natural science and technology education in South Africa. According to the South African Department of Basic Education’s Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement, student assessment is integral to the teaching and learning process. This chapter draws from a research project undertaken in a large province in South Africa. The main participants were grade 4 teachers who taught natural science and technology education, which is science education. Data collection was through semi-structured interviews conducted as well as classroom observations. Guiding the chapter were the following questions: (1) What are teachers’ common understanding and rationale for assessment? (2) What were the common assessment approaches in the observed classrooms and their alignment with pedagogical approaches used by the teachers? (3) How did teachers determine the assessment method that resonated with the used pedagogical approaches for their lessons? The analysis of data followed the iterative approach as suggested by Miles and Huberman (1994). This chapter reveals the lack of congruency between pedagogical and assessment approaches used in teaching, showing a clear lack of wholistic thinking about both teaching and learning process. What further emerged was that assessment was mainly utilised for compliance purposes and not to quality assure the teaching and learning of the students. Thus, the author argues that there is a need for congruence between pedagogical approaches and assessment methods in order to benefit teaching and learning processes. The author cautions that the danger of tick-box compliance without considering the lifelong implications on the students as programme beneficiaries. The author views the tendency to please authorities as nullifying the whole purpose of teaching and learning, which should benefit students by developing them to critical thinkers, problem solvers and productive future citizens of the country.

Details

From Pedagogy to Quality Assurance in Education: An International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-106-8

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2022

Mousin Omar Saib, Mogiveny Rajkoomar, Nalindren Naicker and Cecilia Temilola Olugbara

The purpose of this paper is to identify and present a global perspective of digital pedagogies in relation to technology and academic librarians.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and present a global perspective of digital pedagogies in relation to technology and academic librarians.

Design/methodology/approach

The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) methodology was used in this study.

Findings

Based on the data, academic librarians must develop a foundational understanding of 21st century pedagogies and digital skills to teach in an online environment.

Originality/value

This review paper considers the emergent teaching role of the academic librarian within the digital environment. The themes in the findings highlight the importance of digital pedagogical knowledge and digital fluency of academic librarians as a teacher within the digital environment in higher education.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Martine Gadille, Maria Antonietta Impedovo, Josephine Rémon and Caroline Corvasce

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the creativity of pupils and teachers is nurtured through the use of a virtual world (VW) within a sociotechnical network…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the creativity of pupils and teachers is nurtured through the use of a virtual world (VW) within a sociotechnical network affecting pupils’ learning in a pilot secondary school.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is the result of a pluri-disciplinary systemic analysis involving didactics, sociology, psychology and management science on an individual, collective and systemic scale. This participatory action research is based on interviews and systematic observations in class, in-world and in the global ecosystem. Linguistic and multimodal analysis is applied to the data, through teacher monographs that hint at the teachers’ activity.

Findings

Pupils’ and teachers’ creativity appeared to be anchored within four main interdependent nurturing conditions the personal inclinations and professional interactions in the sociotechnical network sustaining the VW; a creative regulation allowing compromises with the institutional constraints of pedagogical control; avatars and 3 D boundary objects that act as a motor of teachers-pupils inquiry and creativity; the sociotechnical network that contributes, through the actors’ play, to bringing the organisational rules of the school towards an innovation trajectory, that in turns mediates success in the use and the adoption of the new technology.

Research limitations/implications

Although this is a study within a specific school, the findings can be put to use by other pedagogical teams who would wish to integrate a VW to re-engage pupils.

Practical implications

The participatory design processes taking place within a sociotechnical network support teachers in the building of Virtual World scenarios negotiated with researchers and start-up developers.

Social implications

The pedagogical use of a virtual world opens new learning engagement opportunities for the pupils through enhanced experiential learning and sustains the transformation of teachers’ professionality.

Originality/value

The authors’ approach differs from the previous educational VW literature, in that they integrate the teachers’ creativity and their pedagogical scripts into their study, within a systemic approach, thus requiring a wider theoretical framework, necessary for understanding the building of strategies and knowledge that foster teachers’ and pupils’ creativity in educational settings using a VW.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 122 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 April 2019

Gavin Baxter and Thomas Hainey

This paper provides an analysis and insight into undergraduate student views concerning the use of virtual reality technology towards whether it has the potential to…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper provides an analysis and insight into undergraduate student views concerning the use of virtual reality technology towards whether it has the potential to support and provide novel pedagogical avenues towards teaching and learning in higher education. The purpose of this paper is to ascertain student views about the application of VR technology within their degree programmes from a pedagogical perspective in addition to identifying potential challenges to VR adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design adopted a mixed methods approach through the use of a questionnaire that was disseminated to undergraduate students studying in the discipline area of the creative industries. Through a series of open and closed questions, student views on VR adoption in higher education were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results were analysed statistically through a series of Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests. The qualitative statements were contextualised in the overall perspective of the research with the more relevant viewpoints identified to coincide with aspects of VR discovered in the literature.

Findings

The predominant findings of the research indicated that the majority of the students considered the use of VR to have useful pedagogical implications though not all findings were positive. The findings provided a sound overview of the benefits and potential drawbacks of VR use in general with a more specific focus in an educational context.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the research include the lack of overall generalisations that can be formed from the study due to the sample size and the fact that the results were based from one specific academic institution.

Practical implications

The findings of the research will provide educators with an insight into various perceptions of VR adoption within higher education. This will aid towards allowing them to reflect on whether VR is an appropriate tool to integrate within their curriculum and pedagogical approaches towards course delivery.

Originality/value

Though several studies have explored the use of VR in multiple contexts and subject areas, there still needs to be more research towards its potential drawbacks in a teaching and learning scenario and how to resolve these issues.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Nicola Carr and Kym Fraser

International figures on university expenditure on the development of next generation learning spaces (NGLS) are not readily available but anecdote suggests that simply…

Abstract

International figures on university expenditure on the development of next generation learning spaces (NGLS) are not readily available but anecdote suggests that simply retrofitting an existing classroom as an NGLS conservatively costs $AUD200,000, while developing new buildings often cost in the region of 100 million dollars and over the last five years, many universities in Australia, Europe and North America have developed new buildings. Despite this considerable investment, it appears that the full potential of these spaces is not being realised.

While researchers argue that a more student centred learning approach to teaching has inspired the design of next generation learning spaces (Tom, Voss, & Scheetz, 2008) and that changed spaces change practice (Joint Information Systems Committee, 2009) when ‘confronted’ with a next generation learning spaces for the first time, anecdotes suggest that many academics resort to teaching as they have always taught and as they were taught. This chapter highlights factors that influence teaching practices, showing that they are to be found in the external, organisational and personal domains.

We argue that in order to fully realise significant improvements in student outcomes through the sector’s investment in next generation learning spaces, universities need to provide holistic and systematic support across three domains – the external, the organisational and the personal domains, by changing policies, systems, procedures and localised practices to better facilitate changes in teaching practices that maximise the potential of next generation learning spaces.

Details

The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 14000