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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Anastasia Katou, Pawan Budhwar and Mohinder D. Chand

This paper examines the relationship between timing of negotiations and idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) through the moderating effects of core self-evaluations (CSE), and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the relationship between timing of negotiations and idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) through the moderating effects of core self-evaluations (CSE), and between i-deals and employee reactions through the moderating effects of transformational leadership behaviour (TLB) in the Indian hospitality industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 275 employees working in 39 companies responded to a self-administered questionnaire. To test the research hypotheses, the methodology of structural equation models was used.

Findings

The results show that the relationship between before hiring negotiations and i-deals is stronger for those individuals who had low self-worth, due to countervailing forces created by their belief that they may not be eligible for i-deals. In contrast, the relationship between after hiring negotiations and i-deals is stronger for those who had high self-worth, due to their belief that they were entitled to i-deals. Additionally, the research highlights that the relationship between i-deals and employee reactions is stronger for those organisations, which are high on TLB.

Research limitations/implications

The data does not allow for investigating dynamic causal inferences, because they were collected using a questionnaire at a single point in time, and they were reported in retrospect, raising measurement concerns about recall bias.

Practical implications

From a managerial point of view, the findings of this study inform that in negotiating both employment conditions and work arrangements, organisations should try to achieve i-deals that are primarily flexibility focused, and that in increasing efficiency organisations should make the employees feel well supported in order to develop more confidence in deploying skills and abilities to address a more open view of their i-deals.

Originality/value

The study contributes to our understanding about the Indian hospitality industry by utilising the self-enhancement theory in examining whether individual differences moderate the relationship between the timing of negotiations and i-deals, and also by utilizing the social exchange theory to examine whether TLB moderates the relationship between i-deals and employee reactions.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2016

Arup Varma, Pawan Budhwar, Anastasia Katou and Jossy Matthew

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role played by host country nationals’ (HCNs) collectivism and the interpersonal affect they develop toward expatriate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role played by host country nationals’ (HCNs) collectivism and the interpersonal affect they develop toward expatriate colleagues, in determining the degree to which Chinese HCNs would be willing to offer role information and social support to expatriates from India and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a between-subjects simulation (n=402) with front-line, junior-level professionals in four global organizations operating in China, measuring their interpersonal affect toward a hypothetical expatriate colleague, and their willingness to offer role information and social support to the expatriate.

Findings

Results indicated the interpersonal affect felt by Chinese HCNs mediates the relationship between the collectivism levels of Chinese HCNs, and their willingness to offer role information and social support to expatriates.

Research limitations/implications

It should be acknowledged that the authors used hypothetical “paper-people” to test the hypotheses. Future studies should investigate the impact of collectivism and interpersonal affect on HCN willingness to offer role information and social support by examining HCNs’ attitudes toward real-life expatriate colleagues.

Originality/value

While empirical studies examining HCN willingness to offer role information and social support have begun to emerge in the expatriate literature, only a couple of studies have included interpersonal affect as a key determinant. Given that interpersonal affect is a key determinant of individuals’ reactions to others, but also a complex construct, the findings confirm the need for organizations to examine how this impacts performance and co-worker interactions in the workplace.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2019

Shaun Pichler, Beth Livingston, Andrew Yu, Arup Varma, Pawan Budhwar and Arti Shukla

The diversity literature has yet to investigate relationships between diversity and leader–member exchanges (LMX) at multiple levels of analysis. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The diversity literature has yet to investigate relationships between diversity and leader–member exchanges (LMX) at multiple levels of analysis. The purpose of this paper is to test a multilevel model of nationality diversity and LMX. In doing so, the authors investigate the role of surface- and deep-level diversity as related to leader–member exchange differentiation (LMXD) and relative LMX (RLMX), and hence to subordinate job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test a multilevel model of diversity and LMX using multisource survey data from subordinates nesting within supervisors. The authors do so in a context where diversity in nationality is pervasive and plays a key role in LMXs, i.e., a multinational organization in Dubai. The authors tested the cross-level moderated model using MPlus.

Findings

The results suggest surface-level similarity is more important to RLMX than deep-level similarity. The relationship between surface-level similarity and RLMX is moderated by workgroup nationality diversity. When workgroups are more diverse, there is a positive relationship between dyadic nationality similarity and RLMX; when workgroups are less diverse, similarity in nationality matters less. Moreover, LMXD at the workgroup level moderates the relationship between RLMX and performance at the individual level.

Originality/value

This study is one of very few to examine both diversity and LMX at multiple levels of analysis. This is the first study to test the workgroup diversity as a cross-level moderator of the relationship between deep-level similarity and LMX. The results challenge the prevailing notion that that deep-level similarity is more strongly related to LMX than surface-level diversity.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2019

Hoa Do, Pawan Budhwar and Charmi Patel

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of high-performance work systems (HPWS) on the performance of Vietnamese firms. It teases out the antecedents and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of high-performance work systems (HPWS) on the performance of Vietnamese firms. It teases out the antecedents and effects of managers’ beliefs about why HPWS exist and are adopted within their firms, and also what effects HPWS practices have on their firm’s performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a longitudinal design to provide insights into why and how HPWS are shaped and diffused, and also how they convert the inputs into outputs such as HR outcomes, firm innovation and performance, based on a sample of 17 in-depth interviewees who were CEOs, HR managers, general managers in 17 Vietnamese service firms.

Findings

Results demonstrate that HPWS can impact both employee outcomes (e.g. employee attitudes, behaviours and productivity), and firm performance (e.g. firm innovation, firm growth and profit growth).

Practical implications

The study underscores the importance of HPWS as a response to organizational change that can help deal with external pressures and provides evidence about how the HPWS-innovation relationship is established in the research context.

Originality/value

This is among the first study to extend some aspects of institutional theory to understand the context of how and why HPWS are shaped and executed to respond to environmental pressures. It underscores the importance of HPWS as a response to organizational change that can help deal with external pressures, thereby serving as a leading step to yield meaningful outcomes with respect to the advancement of this research stream.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2017

Umesh Bamel, Pawan Budhwar, Peter Stokes and Happy Paul

While a range of studies have been undertaken on role efficacy (RE) and managerial effectiveness (ME), understanding of the link between RE and ME in the extant literature…

Abstract

Purpose

While a range of studies have been undertaken on role efficacy (RE) and managerial effectiveness (ME), understanding of the link between RE and ME in the extant literature remains underdeveloped and, in particular, there is a need to develop appreciation of the phenomenon in varying (national and cultural) contexts. The purpose of this paper is to advance the understanding of ME by considering the relationship between RE and ME in the Indian context. In tandem with this focus, the study considers the parallel underlying dynamic and influence of social cognitive frameworks and adaptive self-regulation mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a quantitative methodology and follows a correlational design. A survey questionnaire was employed sequentially (the independent variable was measured at time 1 and the dependent variable was measure at time 2) in order to collect data from 294 Indian managers. Structural equation modeling was used to ascertain the validity of measures and multiple hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to test the study hypotheses.

Findings

The results of the study identify that RE dimensions, i.e. role making, role centering and role linkage were significantly and positively related to ME and these findings are particularly important in relation to the transforming cultures of Indian work and organizational environments. These findings advance the understanding of social cognitive theory and adaptive self-regulation processes in relation to RE and ME.

Practical implications

The empirical results of this study suggest that RE-related components may be used as means to boost employee effectiveness.

Originality/value

The study identifies a significant role for RE in relation to beneficial outcomes for ME. These findings contribute to the field of social cognitive mechanisms by establishing positive relationships in domain link efficacy, i.e. RE and ME.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Vijay Edward Pereira, Rita Fontinha, Pawan Budhwar and Bimal Arora

High-performance work practices (HPWPs) have been well documented within private organisations in developed country economies. Such practices, however, remain…

Abstract

Purpose

High-performance work practices (HPWPs) have been well documented within private organisations in developed country economies. Such practices, however, remain under-investigated in the public sector and in emerging economies. The purpose of this paper is to work towards filling this void, by empirically evaluating HPWP within an Indian public sector undertaking (PSU), also the world’s largest commercial public sector employer: the Indian Railways (IR).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigate whether the practices implemented in this organisation are consistent with the idea of HPWPs, and analyse how they are influenced by different stakeholders and ultimately associated with different indicators of organisational performance. The authors focused on six railway zones and interviewed a total of 62 HR practitioners.

Findings

The results show that most practices implemented are aligned with the idea of HPWPs, despite the existence of context-specific unique practices. Furthermore, the authors identify the influence of multiple stakeholders in decision making concerning different practices. The authors additionally found that the measurement of performance goes beyond financial indicators and several context-specific non-financial indicators are identified and their social importance is reiterated.

Originality/value

Theoretically, this paper utilises and contributes to the resource-based view of firms by identifying a distinctive bundle of competencies in human resources through HPWS in the IR.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Sunanda Nayak, Pawan Budhwar, Vijay Pereira and Ashish Malik

Rapid technological advancements and the ever-increasing demand for Internet and social networking sites worldwide have increased the opportunity for extensive use and…

Abstract

Purpose

Rapid technological advancements and the ever-increasing demand for Internet and social networking sites worldwide have increased the opportunity for extensive use and misuse of these platforms. Research and practice have typically focused on the brighter side of social networking sites due to the adoption of EHRM (Electronic Human Resource Management). However, less is known about the dark side of EHRM, especially the drawbacks associated with the use of social networking (SNs) platforms in organisations. In addition, most of such studies have primarily involved the western country context, and in an emerging country scenario, these kinds of studies are limited. Hence, the study aims to investigate the complexities of the use of SNs as an e-HRM strategy in organisations in an emerging country context.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on 26 in-depth interviews of HR practitioners and analysing their narratives surrounding employees' use of social networking (both enterprise social networks [ESNs] and social networking sites [SNSs]), this study illuminates the dark or the adverse side of EHRM. Specifically, it focuses on the link between employees' deviant workplace behaviour and their usage of social networking (SN) platforms in organisations (i.e. SNs at workplaces influencing employee's unethical behaviour at work).

Findings

The empirical findings reveal the subtle intentional and unintentional indulgence of employees via SNs in various types of deviant behaviours such as sharing confidential information, bullying, harassment, breaching colleagues' privacy, etc., at the workplace in the emerging market context of India. Utilising the social networking perspective and the 4Ps of deviant theory, this article describes deviance behaviours in detail and explains the inadvertent complexities of leveraging SNs as an EHRM tool at the workplace. These insights then provide a starting point for discussing the theoretical and managerial implications of the research findings.

Research limitations/implications

Derived from the current research, this model offers an integrative frame-work for understanding DWBs in SNs platforms in general. This also shows that use of SNs at workplace often leads the employee engaging in non-productive activity. Hence future studies can explore the application of this framework in organizations in detail, thus further highlighting the usefulness of EHRM to understand the employee behaviours at the workplace by the organisations.

Practical implications

The research offers several managerial implications concerning the use of SNs as EHRM strategy at the workplace, which is perceived as a global challenge nowadays. Primarily it offers suggestions for the social media professionals and HR practitioners regarding the use of SNs in organisations.

Originality/value

The study's findings highlight the complex process that explains how SNs as an EHRM strategy affect employee deviance behaviours in the workplace. Till date, no known study has considered the possible effect of SNs on deviance behavior at the workplace in an emerging country context.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2020

Happy Paul, Pawan Budhwar and Umesh Bamel

The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically test a model that examines subjective well-being (SWB) components (affect balance and life satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically test a model that examines subjective well-being (SWB) components (affect balance and life satisfaction, colloquially referred to as “happiness”), as the intervening variables between resilience and organizational commitment (OC), drawing on appraisal theory and job demands‒resources model.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an employee sample (n=345) from Indian organizations, this study uses structural equation modeling to confirm the differential mediating mechanism for OC dimensions.

Findings

The results suggest that resilience can create a pathway for positive emotions and increase life satisfaction, which, in turn, can help an employee to stick to the organization. Notably, findings indicate that affect balance fully mediates the linkages between resilience and affective commitment, whereas life satisfaction fully mediates the relationship between resilience and continuance commitment.

Practical implications

Besides making useful contributions to the concerned literature, the findings also have useful messages for managers and organizations trying to develop a committed workforce by building employee resilience.

Originality/value

Although previous studies have supported the relationship between resilience and OC, to date, no study has analyzed the motivational and cognitive process through which resilience relates to each dimension of OC (i.e. affective, normative and continuance).

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2009

Pawan S. Budhwar, Arup Varma and Anastasia A. Katou

Mergers and acquisitions (M&) are increasingly becoming a strategy of choice for companies attempting to achieve and sustain competitive advantage. However, not all M&As…

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Abstract

Mergers and acquisitions (M&) are increasingly becoming a strategy of choice for companies attempting to achieve and sustain competitive advantage. However, not all M&As are a success. In this paper, we examine the three main reasons highlighted in the literature as major causes of M&A failure (clashing corporate cultures, absence of clear communication, and employee involvement) in three Indian pharmaceutical companies, and we analyze the role played by the HR function in addressing them. Also, we discuss the importance of gaining the commitment and focus of the workforce during the acquisition process through employee involvement.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Human & Technological Resource Management (HTRM): New Insights into Revolution 4.0
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-224-9

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