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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2011

Pavlos A. Vlachos, Adam P. Vrechopoulos and K. Pramatari

The satisfaction‐trust paradigm has been recently criticized regarding its ability to deliver positive consumer behavioral outcomes. This study aims to argue that  

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1264

Abstract

Purpose

The satisfaction‐trust paradigm has been recently criticized regarding its ability to deliver positive consumer behavioral outcomes. This study aims to argue that – amongst others – a reason for this unpleasant situation may be the failure of service managers to account for non‐linearities in the satisfaction‐trust paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

The setting for this study was the supermarket retail channel. A total of 942 respondents were “intercepted” in supermarket stores, employing a face‐to‐face personal interviewing method. For the detection of curvilinear effects the study employed the two‐step single indicant method of Ping.

Findings

It is posited that consumer trust is an important intervening variable through which non‐linear service evaluation effects translate into word‐of‐mouth. Findings imply that investing resources in satisfaction programs do not do a good job in building positive word‐of‐mouth from a point on. Economic value evaluations and trust judgments seem to be both necessary and sufficient conditions for building consumer relationships.

Research limitations/implications

Theoretically, the work extends the relationship marketing research stream suggesting that curvilinear mechanisms are likely present in the well accepted satisfaction‐trust paradigm. Limitations of the study relate to the generalization of the findings in other sectors besides grocery retailing and its cross‐sectional nature.

Practical implications

The findings of this study suggest that relationship marketing managers would be ill‐advised in their investment decisions should they use a linear‐only terms trust model.

Originality/value

This article extends the trust literature in that it investigates whether consumer trust suffers from diminishing returns. Service providers who strive to build long‐term relationships with their customers may not do a good job if they continue to invest in trust determinants that present diminishing returns to scale.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Pavlos A. Vlachos

This paper aims to examine the influence of corporate social performance (CSP) on the emotional attachment of consumers to firms. In contrast to past CSR studies, this…

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3093

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of corporate social performance (CSP) on the emotional attachment of consumers to firms. In contrast to past CSR studies, this research seeks to investigate the role of personality variables as moderating factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The study tested hypotheses through an experiment using scenarios, addressing corporate social responsibility activities, manipulating domains like environmental protection, treatment of employees, and charitable giving.

Findings

The results indicate that CSP influences consumer‐firm emotional attachment and that this attachment constitutes an unrecognized mediational pathway in the CSP‐loyalty link. The results identify the moderating and strengthening role of altruism, need‐for‐activity, and esteem‐enhancement on the CSP‐emotional attachment link. Finally, the study reveals that attributions are likely to moderate the influence of consumer altruism.

Research limitations/implications

Although the CSP record scenarios reflected real corporate social responsibility practices, future studies employing field experiments or consumer surveys exploring the effects of actual corporate social responsibility initiatives would be valuable to enhance the external validity of these results.

Practical implications

The study helps retailers towards improved and more targeted social responsibility investments. Specifically, retailers targeting consumer groups that are high in altruism, high in need for activity, and high in self‐enhancement motives are probably in a more advantageous position when investing in CSR initiatives as a way to build and further deepen emotional attachment, and indirectly consumer loyalty.

Originality/value

Building on the CSR and attachment literatures, the study investigates the extent to which CSP is capable of influencing customer loyalty through emotion‐laden processes. Furthermore, in contrast to previous CSR studies, this study is one of the first to directly investigate whether consumer differences influence consumer reactions to CSR. Specifically, this study finds that differences in consumers' personality traits may affect the effectiveness of CSR initiatives.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 46 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Pavlos A. Vlachos and Adam P. Vrechopoulos

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the theoretical and empirical meaningfulness of a composite model of behavioral intentions in a pure mobile internet services context.

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4205

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the theoretical and empirical meaningfulness of a composite model of behavioral intentions in a pure mobile internet services context.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper starts by investigating the influence of seven service quality determinants on overall service quality perceptions, employing a qualitative research design. Next, these determinants are embedded in a holistic nomological framework depicting the complex interrelationships between prominent service evaluation constructs and behavioral intentions. The model is tested employing partial‐least squares structural equation modeling in the context of a field experiment involving the delivery of music content over real‐world mobile networks and devices.

Findings

The study finds that content quality, contextual quality, device quality, connection quality and privacy concerns have a strong positive influence on service quality perceptions. Overall, service quality, value and satisfaction have a simultaneous direct effect on behavioral intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Consumer decision making is complex, and, for gaining favorable consumer behavior, it does not suffice to manage and measure service quality, satisfaction and value in an isolated manner but rather in a collective way.

Practical implications

So as to adopt mobile e‐commerce services consumers require to be rewarded with high levels of outcome quality (e.g., wide selection of music songs, sonic and video quality), anytime and most importantly at any place.

Originality/value

Study results imply that when it comes to specifying service evaluation frameworks employing service quality, satisfaction and value‐operationalized at a cumulative level traditional exchange contexts are not different from electronic commerce exchanges.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Pavlos A. Vlachos, Aristeidis Theotokis, Katerina Pramatari and Adam Vrechopoulos

The purpose of the study is to investigate loyalty building and the creation of affectionate bonds in the consumer‐firm dyad.

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6515

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate loyalty building and the creation of affectionate bonds in the consumer‐firm dyad.

Design/methodology/approach

The study relies on face‐to‐face personal interviews in the context of grocery store retailing.

Findings

The results identify the significant predictors of consumer‐firm emotional attachment to be firm trust, trust in employees, likeability of service personnel and likeability of co‐consumers, shopping enjoyment, self‐expressiveness, place dependence, and place identity. Consumers' self‐enrichment, self‐gratification and self‐enablement likely influence emotional attachment, which in turn is a strong predictor of behavioral loyalty and word of mouth. Attachment anxiety appears to multiply the effects of emotional attachment on behavioral loyalty and word of mouth.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional nature of the study precludes definitive conclusions concerning causality between the constructs utilized. The data come from the supermarket retail channel, limiting the generalizibility of the results.

Practical implications

As the results suggest that the consumer's self‐enrichment seems to be the most important factor in determining emotional attachment, managers should incorporate the notion of emotional attachment into strategic performance management systems.

Originality/value

The study incorporates the notion of consumer heterogeneity into the relationship anxiety construct, arguing in favor of a non‐additive consumer‐firm emotional attachment nomological network.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Supawat Meeprom and Pipatpong Fakfare

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between self-congruence and attendee engagement in explaining emotional attachment in the context of cultural events.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between self-congruence and attendee engagement in explaining emotional attachment in the context of cultural events.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modelling with partial least squares analysis has been applied. Data were collected from 421 respondents through an onsite survey during the Yi Peng and Loy Krathong festive week in Thailand.

Findings

The findings revealed that self-congruence (i.e. actual self-congruence and ideal self-congruence) has a positive influence on attendee engagement. When attendees' actual self and ideal self-match with the event image, they are more likely to actively engage in the event activities.

Originality/value

The findings offer insights into one type of events, the cultural event, which is a common event in Thailand. This study is also one among a handful works that investigates the moderating role of perceived crowding on the relationship between attendees' actual and ideal self-congruence and engagement with the event. Although the findings do not suggest a significant moderating effect, this study provides preliminary insight into how perceived crowding shapes the perception of tourists in a cultural event context.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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2331

Abstract

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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