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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Jaywant Singh, Paurav Shukla and Stavros P. Kalafatis

While trade shows remain an important customer relationship management (CRM) tool, recent advancements in information technology (IT) have raised concerns about the future…

Abstract

Purpose

While trade shows remain an important customer relationship management (CRM) tool, recent advancements in information technology (IT) have raised concerns about the future of trade shows. This study aims to examine the antecedents and consequences of IT integration into trade shows.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a questionnaire-based survey with senior and middle managers in the aviation services, resulting in 135 valid responses from industry professionals. The data were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings demonstrate differential but significant impact of perceptions toward website design and firm motivations toward the integration IT in the three stages of trade shows marketing. The results also show significant impact of IT usage on the perceptions toward the accomplishment of trade show objectives. Further, the results vary according to the levels of experience of the professionals.

Research limitations/implications

This study did not account for the differences in perceptions toward IT implementation across personnel from different departments, such as IT, finance and operations management. In addition, it did not examine situational factors and individual characteristics as additional antecedents of IT usage in trade shows, including pricing, return on investment, convenience and the social media.

Practical implications

Exhibitors are advised to integrate IT in supporting pre-trade show activities to approach potential customers. Exhibitors should integrate electronic interactions and personal communications during the show to reduce the amount of unanswered customer queries, focusing on timeliness and accuracy of information content, ease of navigation and graphic attractiveness of corporate websites, as effective CRM tools.

Originality/value

This paper offers novel insights into hitherto unknown aspects of trade show performance. The results have managerial implications for adopting IT as a CRM tool for effective trade show management.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

N. Meltem Cakici and Paurav Shukla

Extant research shows that consumers regularly misclassify country-of-origin (COO) associated with brands. The purpose of this paper is to examine changes in behavioral…

3022

Abstract

Purpose

Extant research shows that consumers regularly misclassify country-of-origin (COO) associated with brands. The purpose of this paper is to examine changes in behavioral intentions (i.e. purchase intentions for self and others and brand judgments) when consumers are made aware that they have misclassified the COO and then are informed of the brand’s correct origin. Drawing on cognitive dissonance theory, the authors also explore the moderating roles of consumer affinity, animosity, and product knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments test the direct and moderating effects of COO misclassification awareness on behavioral intentions.

Findings

The findings show detrimental effects of misclassification on behavioral intentions when consumers have high affinity with misclassified COO. Moreover, the experiments demonstrate a significantly greater decrease in behavioral intentions among experts than novices in the low-affinity condition and the reverse effect in the high-affinity condition.

Practical implications

The negative effects of COO misclassification on consumer behavioral intentions highlight the need for managers to proactively avoid misclassification. The findings should also aid managers in developing responsive marketing campaigns that consider consumer affinity, animosity, and level of product knowledge.

Originality/value

This research is the first to compare consumer behavioral responses before and after COO misclassification awareness. The study demonstrates that cognitive dissonance underpins the process of misclassification. It also contributes to COO literature by examining the interaction of consumer affinity and animosity with product knowledge and their influence on consumer behavior in the case of COO misclassification.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Paurav Shukla

This special issue aims to present India as one of the world's most promising and fastest growing economies, with multinational companies eager to invest.

3651

Abstract

Purpose

This special issue aims to present India as one of the world's most promising and fastest growing economies, with multinational companies eager to invest.

Design/methodology/approach

Examines the eight articles and the contribution of each to an important aspect of marketing in the region.

Findings

The issue provides insights from both organizational and consumer perspectives; provides various methodological insights in researching the Indian marketplace; being specifically focused on India, the findings are applicable in the Indian market context which has a need for customized tools and marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This issue will assist practitioners, researchers and budding marketers, eyeing India as a potential market, and adds to the existing debate on emerging paradigms in the Indian marketplace on several fonts.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Madhumita Banerjee, Paurav Shukla and Nicholas J. Ashill

While the literature on migration highlights the reshaping of host and immigrant population in countries, there is a paucity of research in marketing investigating the…

Abstract

Purpose

While the literature on migration highlights the reshaping of host and immigrant population in countries, there is a paucity of research in marketing investigating the evolving dynamics for acculturation. The purpose of this study is to further the understanding of the emerging phenomenon of acculturation and identity negotiation.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments examined situational ethnicity, self-construal and identity negotiation in home and host culture work and social settings. Study 1 and Study 2 were conducted in the United Kingdom (UK), where the host country is the majority population. Study 3 was conducted in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where the host country is the minority population. Study 4 utilized qualitative interviews in both countries.

Findings

Results from all four studies show that ethnic consumers deploy “indifference” as an identity negotiation mechanism when the host society is the majority population (UK) and when the host society has the minority population (UAE).

Originality/value

The authors offer new insights into identity negotiation by ethnic consumers when the host society is the majority population as well as the minority population. “Indifference”, i.e. preferring to neither fit in nor stand out as an identity negotiation mechanism, is deployed in work and social settings of home and host societies. The authors also advance the existing literature on acculturation by examining whether independent and interdependent self-construal influence identity negotiation.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2020

Weisha Wang, Cheng-Hao Steve Chen, Bang Nguyen and Paurav Shukla

With rising globalization, Western and Eastern brands are increasingly collaborating and co-branding. Drawing on the theory of dialectical self that captures the degree of…

Abstract

Purpose

With rising globalization, Western and Eastern brands are increasingly collaborating and co-branding. Drawing on the theory of dialectical self that captures the degree of cognitive tendency to tolerate conflicts, inconsistencies and ambiguities in self-concept, this paper investigates the effect of consumer dialectical self on co-branding that encompasses Western and East Asian cultural brand personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were conducted using Chinese participants to examine the effects of the dialectical self on co-brand evaluation under single-and dual-personality conditions and to explore the mediating role of ideal social self-congruence and the moderating role of product type (high vs low conspicuous).

Findings

The findings suggest that counterintuitive to the received wisdom, the dialectical self negatively influences one's attitude towards a co-brand in the dual-personality condition only. Further, ideal social self-congruence mediates the relationship between the dialectical self and dual-personality co-brand evaluation in the high conspicuous product condition only.

Practical implications

Important implications are offered to international marketing managers for managing the dialectical self that lead to positive co-brand evaluations. Moreover, managers should highlight ideal social self-congruence for co-branding success for particular product types.

Originality/value

This paper examines co-branding from a novel perspective of consumer dialectical self and shows the pivotal role it plays when brands carry varying cultural traits engage in co-branding. By identifying the role of the dialectical self and the important mediator and moderator, the paper fulfils an important gap in co-branding literature and offers key implications.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2013

Keith J. Perks, Stephen P. Hogan and Paurav Shukla

Whilst earlier studies of market entry success factors have mostly focused on large emerging markets such as China or India, limited attention has been given to smaller…

2587

Abstract

Purpose

Whilst earlier studies of market entry success factors have mostly focused on large emerging markets such as China or India, limited attention has been given to smaller emerging markets. The purpose of this paper is to identify the effects of firm-level (i.e. entry mode and firm size), country-level (i.e. market potential, country risk and openness) and cultural distance on successful market entry strategies of multinational enterprises (MNEs) in a smaller emerging country (Thailand).

Design/methodology/approach

Using archival data from 1996-2008 and a survey of 139 firms, the results reveal significant influence of both market potential and cultural distance on successful market entry.

Findings

Overall, the findings demonstrate a cautionary approach when generalizing the results of studies focusing on large emerging markets to smaller emerging markets. Smaller emerging markets such as Thailand offer very different market-space than large emerging markets and therefore the overall determinants of success may differ substantially.

Practical implications

Market potential appears to be the most significant variable in entering the Thai market. The findings also suggest a negative and significant relationship between cultural distance and market success in Thailand. This reveals that foreign firms that enter small emerging markets which are culturally close to their home countries can enjoy a greater possibility of success.

Originality/value

This study is a first step towards sensitizing corporations and policy makers in understanding the differences in market entry success factors between larger and smaller emerging markets and strategizing accordingly.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2013

Kim-Shyan Fam, Ernest Cyril de Run and Paurav Shukla

213

Abstract

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Paurav Shukla

Despite the growing debate about differences in consumer attitudes and behavior in emerging and developed markets, there is little research on the differences in consumer…

14513

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the growing debate about differences in consumer attitudes and behavior in emerging and developed markets, there is little research on the differences in consumer value perceptions and their influence on purchase intentions. Focusing on the theory of impression management, the purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual framework incorporating the social (conspicuousness and status), personal (hedonism and materialism) and functional (uniqueness and price‐quality perceptions) value perceptions using the context of luxury goods.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a structured questionnaire‐ based study of consumers in four countries, representing two leading Western developed luxury markets (the US and the UK) and two important Eastern emerging markets (India and Malaysia). Multiple‐group SEM analysis was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The findings show several differences in the influence of value perceptions on consumer purchase intentions in the Western developed and Eastern emerging markets. The study highlights the importance of understanding the homogeneity and heterogeneity in consumer consumption decisions and provides managers with a basis to adapt their strategic responses.

Originality/value

The results offer needed empirical support and cross‐cultural stability to the much theorized construct of value perceptions by exploring their effects within and between Western developed and Eastern emerging markets. Additionally, it unifies and complements the previous work by integrating the theory of impression management and value perceptions framework, thus providing a comprehensive theoretical framework with empirical support.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Paurav Shukla

The study addresses the effect of product usage, satisfaction derived out of the same and the brand switching behaviour in several product categories while looking at the…

5913

Abstract

The study addresses the effect of product usage, satisfaction derived out of the same and the brand switching behaviour in several product categories while looking at the product involvement level in the Indian marketplace. A fair amount of work has been done in the area of customer satisfaction and loyalty and many customer satisfaction indexes are available in the market using different variables and characteristics. The study attempts to understand the brand switching behaviour of the customers and its relation not with just satisfaction derived out of the product but also connects to the usage pattern of the customers and product involvement. Five categories (vehicles, television, soap, hair oil, and ice cream), involving varying levels of involvement were chosen. Cluster analysis was used to understand the grouping of the characteristics across the categories and their effect on brand switching behaviour in correlation with satisfaction and involvement level. It was observed that product usage and related level of satisfaction fail to explain the brand switching behaviour. Product involvement was found to have moderate impact on readiness to switch. The study emphasises that marketers will have to keep a constant eye to understand the usage pattern associated with their products and the satisfaction derived out of it and also at how customers involve themselves with the product to lessen the brand switching behaviour among their customers.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Paurav Shukla, Janice Brown and Donna Harper

Image has been found to be one of the important influences in the selection of consumers' choice for visiting and investing in a destination leading to sustainable…

1061

Abstract

Image has been found to be one of the important influences in the selection of consumers' choice for visiting and investing in a destination leading to sustainable development. Important determinants of tourism namely, knowledge of destination attractions and image association were employed in this research based on previous studies in a number of fields. The research reported in this paper presents the results of an empirical test of the determinants related to tourism using Liverpool as a case study because of its selection as the European Capital of Culture (CoC) for 2008. European Capital of Culture scheme has among its many objectives the idea of sustainable development for the chosen CoC. Combination of data collection methods was used for the research. The paper contributes to the ongoing debate on destination image association by providing empirical evidence through the case study or Liverpool as well as how consumers relate to a destination and especially a CoC. One of the major findings of the study was the identification of image association clusters with regard to Liverpool as a CoC. We brand this clusters as the ‘tangible attractions cluster’ and ‘intangible attractions cluster’. The results of this research provide important implications for strategic image management and can aid in designing and implementing sustainable marketing programs for creating and enhancing tourism destination images.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 61 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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