Search results

1 – 3 of 3
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Philippe Odou and Pauline de Pechpeyrou

The purpose of this paper is to offer a new perspective on resistance and anti‐consumption literature by relating it to consumer cynicism.

Downloads
2562

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a new perspective on resistance and anti‐consumption literature by relating it to consumer cynicism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proceeds to a conceptual deconstruction of consumer cynicism by comparing the contemporary meaning of the term with the original signification of cynicism, contrasting the psychological approach with the philosophical one. This perspective sheds light on disparate forms of consumer cynicism found in previous research.

Findings

Four different figures of consumption related to cynicism were distinguished in this paper. Defensive cynicism and offensive cynicism are psychological tools used to neutralize persuasion attempts or divert marketing techniques. Subversive cynicism and ethical cynicism, which are reminiscences of cynicism in Ancient Greece, challenge the consumerist ideology and even propose an alternative ethics.

Originality/value

Prior research on consumer cynicism has focused on the defensive psychological dimension of the concept, limiting it to a coping device for deceived consumers. Three other facets have been explored in this paper and provide a broader framework that can account for the disparate manifestations observed in the resistance and anti‐consumption literature. This new conceptualization of consumer cynicism could also explain why consumers' disappointment with private consumption does not always lead to public involvement.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Pauline de Pechpeyrou

The ability to acquire and process consumer information online has provided web‐based vendors with the ability to personalize their merchandising at a very low cost…

Downloads
2428

Abstract

Purpose

The ability to acquire and process consumer information online has provided web‐based vendors with the ability to personalize their merchandising at a very low cost. However, empirically establishing the expected positive effect of personalized merchandising has been difficult for practical as well as financial reasons. The aim of this paper is to compare the effectiveness of personalized vs random merchandising on consumers' attitudes and behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal subject experiment comparing standardized vs personalized merchandising was adopted. A fictitious web site was created for the purposes of the study.

Findings

Personalized items led to more clicks than random suggestions. Moreover, a positive attitude towards personalization enhanced the attitude towards the web site.

Research limitations/implications

Even if credibility was enhanced thanks to the web site design, the research suffered from a lack of external validity. Additionally, the procedure prevented us from observing any potential effect on basket size.

Practical implications

A strategy of personalizing the content appeared to be relevant for web site managers. They should use “close” recommendations rather than “broad” recommendations and present a moderate number of personalized suggestions.

Originality/value

The research is one of the few online experiments with a longitudinal perspective, which is considered necessary when studying consumers' reactions to the personalization “process”.

Details

Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Béatrice Parguel, Pauline De Pechpeyrou, Ouidade Sabri‐Zaaraoui and Pierre Desmet

Using a classification of benefits and costs of promotional offers along three routes – economic, informational and affective – this paper aims at evaluating, from the…

Downloads
1880

Abstract

Purpose

Using a classification of benefits and costs of promotional offers along three routes – economic, informational and affective – this paper aims at evaluating, from the consumer's point of view, the relative perceptual disadvantages of separate‐item bundles compared to pre‐wrapped bundles.

Design/methodology/approach

The marketing literature and a qualitative study based on 18 consumers permits the identification of the relative perceived costs and benefits associated with separate‐item bundles and for hypotheses to be derived. An experiment on a sample of 120 adult consumers was then set up to test these hypotheses.

Findings

The findings suggest that consumers associate separate‐item bundles with higher economic benefit but also with higher inspection costs. From a more global perspective, there is no loss of interest in separate‐item bundles compared to pre‐wrapped bundles.

Research limitations/implications

Focusing the research on separate‐item bundles clarifies the way consumers evaluate promotions. Its qualitative phase gives support to the relevance of an “informational route”, beyond the traditional utilitarian and hedonic routes. Its quantitative phase confirms the importance of cognitive biases in consumers' perceptions of promotions.

Practical implications

The numerous advantages of separate‐item bundles for manufacturers and retailers and their attraction to consumers should lead to an increasingly intensive use in promotional campaigns. Besides, the quality of in‐store communication is the most important factor of the success of separate‐item bundles, which provides the opportunity to propose meaningful recommendations for practitioners.

Originality/value

If the strengths and weaknesses of separate‐item bundles have already been studied from a managerial point of view, to the authors' knowledge, no research has focused on separate‐item bundle efficiency from the consumer's point of view.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

1 – 3 of 3