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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Pauline Ratnasingam

Power has become an important contextual factor in electronic commerce adoption. Persuading trading partners can mean using persuasive power. Hence, the way power is used…

Abstract

Power has become an important contextual factor in electronic commerce adoption. Persuading trading partners can mean using persuasive power. Hence, the way power is used to influence trading partners will determine the extent to which trust is encouraged during the adoption and integration process. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the impact of power in EDI adoption. The findings of a case study within an automotive manufacturer indicate that negative (coercive) power left smaller suppliers in a situation of uncertainty, and even conflict, whereas positive (persuasive) power resulted in open communications between smaller suppliers and their buyers, thus building trading partner trust and long‐term trading relationships.

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Internet Research, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Pauline Ratnasingam

Inter‐organizational‐systems such as EDI have been the main form of business to business e‐commerce application in the automotive industry for the last two decades…

Abstract

Inter‐organizational‐systems such as EDI have been the main form of business to business e‐commerce application in the automotive industry for the last two decades. However, previous studies in EDI adoption mostly examined environmental, organizational and technological factors. This study examines behavioral dimensions of trading partner trust in EDI adoption via a qualitative interpretative case study conducted between an automotive manufacturer and their first tier supplier. While trading partner trust was observed to be an implicit factor embedded in pre‐arranged contractual agreements, the findings of this study suggests that trading partner trust is important for cooperative long term trading relationships and contributes to increased awareness on the importance of trading partner trust in EDI adoption.

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Internet Research, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2005

Pauline Ratnasingam

Most research has emphasized the interpersonal components of trust involved in establishing ecommerce relationships while limited attention has been paid on the technology…

Abstract

Most research has emphasized the interpersonal components of trust involved in establishing ecommerce relationships while limited attention has been paid on the technology and its interactions on e‐commerce relationships. This paper examines the impact of two forms of trust in e‐commerce relationships namely; technology trust relating to institutional structural assurances and security mechanisms embedded in e‐commerce technologies; and relationship trust referring to trading partners competent, predictably, reliability, and benevolence in the e‐commerce relationship. Based on the findings of a previous study that examined inter‐organizational dyads in business‐to‐business e‐commerce participation, we identify and illustrate how e‐commerce relationships evolve applying four modes in e‐commerce relationships namely; learning, monitoring, collaborating and distancing modes. We develop a number of propositions to facilitate empirical testing and indicate the framework’s key implications for future research and managerial practice.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2003

Pauline Ratnasingam

The emphasis on inter-organizational systems gave rise to concerns about inter-organizational relationships as trading partners became aware of the socio-political factors…

Abstract

The emphasis on inter-organizational systems gave rise to concerns about inter-organizational relationships as trading partners became aware of the socio-political factors and trust that affect their relationships. This paper examines the importance of inter-organizational-trust in business-to-business E-commerce organizations. It examines how inter-organizational relationships impact trading partner trust, perceived benefits, perceived risks, and technology trust mechanisms in E-commerce that can in turn influence outcomes of business-to-business E-commerce. This paper develops a conceptual model and tests the model using a case study research methodology. The aim is to solicit qualitative in depth understanding of inter-organizational-trust in business-to-business E-commerce. Eight organizations from a cross section of industries that formed four bi-directional dyads participated in the third stage of this study. The first two stages include exploratory case studies in three organizations in the automotive industry that applied EDI via Value-Added-Networks in 1997, and a nationwide survey of organizations that examined the extent of E-commerce adoption in Australia and New Zealand in 1998. The findings identify the need for trustworthy business relationships in an E-commerce environment.

Details

Evaluating Marketing Actions and Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-046-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Pauline Ratnasingam

The Internet is changing the way businesses operate today. Firms are using the Web for procurement, to find trading partners, and to link existing applications to other…

Abstract

The Internet is changing the way businesses operate today. Firms are using the Web for procurement, to find trading partners, and to link existing applications to other applications. Web services are rapidly becoming the enabling technology of today’s e‐business, and e‐commerce systems. We are having a massive impact on the way businesses think about designing, developing, and deploying Web‐based applications. Web services may be an evolutionary step in designing distributed applications, however, they are not without problems. There are issues relating to security, transactions and scalability that need to be addressed. This paper addresses security concerns in Web services and the role of technology trust.

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Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Pauline Ratnasingam

The Internet has accelerated the adoption of collaborative commerce among businesses to form Web services. Web services refer to modular Internet‐based business functions…

Abstract

The Internet has accelerated the adoption of collaborative commerce among businesses to form Web services. Web services refer to modular Internet‐based business functions that perform specific business tasks to facilitate business interactions within and beyond the organization. Firms are embedded in networks of collaborative relationships that influence the flow of resources among the stakeholders (requesters, providers, users and employees). Collaboration with Web services creates trust in the technological dimensions of Web services. Technology trust refers to the subjective probability by which organizations believe that the underlying technology infrastructure is capable of facilitating transactions according to their confident expectations. In this paper we examine the role of facilitating conditions in technology trust and its relationship with Web services. We provide a set of guidelines for early adopters and discuss the theoretical and practical implications of Web services and directions for future research.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Pauline Ratnasingam

E‐marketplaces have recently become a popular internet‐based e‐commerce application. Despite extensive research on this topic, there has been limited work in the realm of…

Abstract

Purpose

E‐marketplaces have recently become a popular internet‐based e‐commerce application. Despite extensive research on this topic, there has been limited work in the realm of e‐marketplace security. This paper aims to discuss the role of e‐marketplace risks and controls in seven e‐marketplace firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have identified four types of risks and controls of e‐marketplaces namely; technological, economical, implementation, and relational. Seven e‐marketplace firms from a cross‐section of industries were chosen.

Findings

The research suggests that the type and extent of risks, as well as the type of industry and the products the firm sells, have a direct correlation with the method of e‐commerce application implemented for e‐marketplace.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to a risk control framework in e‐marketplace participation which will increase the awareness of security in e‐marketplace participation.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2009

Pauline Ratnasingam

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of the balanced scorecard methodology in web services quality. A balanced scorecard framework is developed for web…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of the balanced scorecard methodology in web services quality. A balanced scorecard framework is developed for web services quality by identifying critical success factors that make up the business objectives, measures, targets, and initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework of web services quality applying the balanced scorecard methodology is developed by integrating the theory of balanced scorecard and web services. Then, case studies with two organizations in the agricultural industry are deployed to test the framework of the balanced scorecard.

Findings

The findings of the exploratory case studies suggest a cyclic process that was created with the use of the balanced scorecard approach to evaluate the quality of web services applications and in order to integrate quality and to provide a strategic map and indicate how information will be disseminated so that the potential use of web services can be attained.

Practical implications

The study contributes to practitioners as they will have a system which will provide them with timely, cost‐effective, scalable, manageable, and reliable feedback on their strategic performance. Further, the balanced scorecard gives a holistic view of the firms by simultaneously examining its performance from four perspectives; namely learning and growth, internal business processes, customer, and financial perspectives.

Originality/value

Unlike previous research that uses the balanced scorecard to measure the economic impact on the firm. This paper discusses the role of the balanced scorecard methodology in improving the service quality of firms using web services. Further, it provides lessons learned, as in measures that firms can be aware of in the quality of the services they provide.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

When people in Michigan had hard‐wearing outdoor clothing on their shopping list, it’s a good bet they’d be off to Getz’s family‐run store which had been in business for…

Abstract

When people in Michigan had hard‐wearing outdoor clothing on their shopping list, it’s a good bet they’d be off to Getz’s family‐run store which had been in business for the past 100 years and had built up trust between generations of customers and suppliers. Getz had been retailing their comprehensive lines of good‐quality clothing before many of their present‐day customers were born, and they’d even been doing business with some of their current suppliers for 60 to 80 years.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2003

Abstract

Details

Evaluating Marketing Actions and Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-046-3

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