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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Gillian Kellock Hay, Rona S. Beattie, Ron Livingstone and Pauline Munro

Examines the context of the voluntary sector and its impact on organisational processes. Provides a selective overview of traditional literature on change management and…

Abstract

Examines the context of the voluntary sector and its impact on organisational processes. Provides a selective overview of traditional literature on change management and assesses its relevance for the voluntary sector. Investigates alternative models that could facilitate understanding of change processes in the voluntary sector. Discusses the results from an empirical study into the change management experiences of a voluntary sector umbrella body. Concludes with key HRM lessons for the wider voluntary sector at this time of significant change, as well as highlighting the impact of contextual factors on the application of generic models of change.

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Employee Relations, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Pauline Lambell, Anne Cooper, Sam Hoyles, Sally‐Ann Pygall and Alicia O’Cathain

Three written scenarios, based on paediatric fever, with expected outcomes of self‐care (scenario 1), GP routine care (scenario 2) and urgent care (scenario 3), were…

Abstract

Three written scenarios, based on paediatric fever, with expected outcomes of self‐care (scenario 1), GP routine care (scenario 2) and urgent care (scenario 3), were presented to 100 nurse advisors working in NHS Direct, the 24‐hour nurse‐led telephone helpline. Nurse advisors used one of three types of computerised decision support software to determine an outcome for each scenario, and in addition offered self‐care advice. There was variation between nurses in the outcomes for each scenario: 80 per cent of nurse advisors recommended self‐care only for scenario 1, 51 per cent recommended GP routine care for scenario 2, and 88 per cent recommended urgent care for scenario 3. Similar variations were found for the self‐care advice.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2018

Fergus McNeill

Abstract

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Pervasive Punishment
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-466-4

Abstract

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2007

Eddie Chaplin and Jean O'Hara

In the last decade we have witnessed much debate and activity around the provision of mental health services for people with learning disabilities in England. This article…

Abstract

In the last decade we have witnessed much debate and activity around the provision of mental health services for people with learning disabilities in England. This article looks not only at current initiatives to improve mental health care from around England, but also places them within a policy context. Unfortunately there are areas that still fail to provide a basic care standard, some of which has been reported throughout the media from recent investigations. Where this is the case, we outline the responses and actions that have been put in place to address these issues.To maintain a momentum for positive change for the mental health care of people with learning disabilities, there now needs to be cooperation between services that traditionally have not worked together for the benefit of this client group. Before an equality of mental health service provision, in line with national standards, can be realised the traditional views and values of service providers and commissioners will need to be challenged and tuned to the needs of this group of people.

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Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Book part
Publication date: 5 July 2017

Albert J. Mills

Beginning with the premise that “organizational culture” is a useful heuristic for the study of gender at work, this chapter focuses on the problem of studying the culture…

Abstract

Beginning with the premise that “organizational culture” is a useful heuristic for the study of gender at work, this chapter focuses on the problem of studying the culture of organizations over time, setting out to demonstrate how the social construction of corporate history has, until now, lent itself to gendered notions of business practices. Arguing that history itself is but one of a series of discourses about the world, the chapter outlines a feminist strategy for the study of organizational culture over time that includes: (i) feminist historiography as history written from a feminist point of view; (ii) a commitment to the notion of history as discourse rooted in the present; (iii) a view of women’s rights development as a paradoxical process of progress and regress; (iv) a gender focus approach that studies the impact of discrimination on the social construction of masculinity/femininity and sexual preference; and (v) an approach that is sensitive to the contextualization of gender. British Airways is used as a case study to illustrate some of the problems of historic re/construction and feminist historiography.

Details

Insights and Research on the Study of Gender and Intersectionality in International Airline Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-546-7

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

Pauline Anderson

The primary purpose of this paper is to highlight the utility of operationalising the concept of skill ecosystems, or more accurately “intermediate occupational skill ecosystems”.

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this paper is to highlight the utility of operationalising the concept of skill ecosystems, or more accurately “intermediate occupational skill ecosystems”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the process and findings of an empirical study of intermediate occupations in Scotland which set out to explore changing systems of initial skill creation and related problems of skill by embedding these systems within the broader canvas of skill ecosystems.

Findings

Operationalising skill ecosystems not only provided a framework from which to explore and provide an explanation of changing initial systems of skill creation but also supported broader conjectures on the nature of developments and problems within intermediate occupations.

Practical implications

The operationalisation presented has relevance to policy makers and academics beyond the scope of this particular examination of intermediate occupations. For policy makers, it emphasises that better skills utilisation cannot be reduced to the level of the individual; that the supply, demand, development and deployment of skills are interrelated and not discrete; and that the roles and relative influences of actors in a position to help build and sustain better skill ecosystems are changing. For academics concerned with exploring changing systems of skill creation, this, or some similar, operationalisation, has potential practical application in terms of supporting key stages in the research process.

Originality/value

This paper's value centres around the proposition, and illustration, that it is possible to effectively utilise a simple operationalisation of the inherently “messy” concept of skill ecosystems without losing the essence and complexity of the relations and dynamics embodied in the concept.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Robin Sydserff and Pauline Weetman

This paper responds to a call in the literature for methodological and empirical studies to advance research into accounting narratives, in the light of acknowledged areas…

Abstract

This paper responds to a call in the literature for methodological and empirical studies to advance research into accounting narratives, in the light of acknowledged areas of weakness and gaps in the accounting literature and with a view to investigating impression management. A general line of critique in the accounting literature points to a need to expand both the syntactic and thematic dimensions, with a particular focus on developing objective methods of analysis that allow computer‐based measurement. The paper draws on the literature of managerial business communications, supported by that of applied linguistics, in bringing to accounting research a transitivity index and the application of DICTION analysis. Both have the potential to extend computer‐based analysis of accounting narratives, subject to careful initial research design and specification. The potential for a richer empirical analysis is demonstrated through an illustrative empirical application.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Robin Sydserff and Pauline Weetman

Readability formulas have been criticised as a method for scoring accounting narratives because of their focus on word‐ and sentence‐level features and not on whole‐text…

Abstract

Readability formulas have been criticised as a method for scoring accounting narratives because of their focus on word‐ and sentence‐level features and not on whole‐text aspects, their lack of regard for the interests and motivation of the reader, and their inappropriateness for evaluating adult‐based and technical accounting narratives. The literature of linguistics offers theoretical and practical validation for application of a texture index which addresses these criticisms. The paper shows how the general model drawn from applied linguistics can be tailored to the specific situation of an accounting narrative – the Operating and Financial Review. Rules which provide for objectivity in replication are specified and illustrated for a sample narrative. Illustrative empirical analysis shows that there is no evidence of association with the Flesch readability score. This suggests that the texture index is potentially a powerful tool for analysis of accounting narratives and association testing.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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