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Article

Pauline Collins

This paper aims to raise awareness and the level of debate on a significant new development in international law.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to raise awareness and the level of debate on a significant new development in international law.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes a historical overview in considering current approaches to the phenomenon of private military corporations (PMCs) and uses case examples to discuss the issues raised.

Findings

The paper concludes that the phenomenon raises many issues that need further analysis, such as the outcome of this phenomenon on the future of democracy in sovereign states.

Research limitations/implications

The topic allows for much further research into such matters as definitional, jurisdictional and enforceability issues with regard to corporate entities known as PMCs.

Practical implications

For peace and human rights to prevail in democracies in which the state maintains the monopoly on the use of force, the paper argues that PMCs should be prohibited rather than subjected to mere regulation.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to use the term “preyfits” in describing the actions of transnational corporations. While most scholars argue for regulation of PMCs, this paper argues for their total prohibition.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Book part

Paul A. Pautler

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the…

Abstract

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the preferences and ideology of the FTC’s leaders, developments in the field of economics, and the tenor of the times. The over-riding current role is to provide well considered, unbiased economic advice regarding antitrust and consumer protection law enforcement cases to the legal staff and the Commission. The second role, which long ago was primary, is to provide reports on investigations of various industries to the public and public officials. This role was more recently called research or “policy R&D”. A third role is to advocate for competition and markets both domestically and internationally. As a practical matter, the provision of economic advice to the FTC and to the legal staff has required that the economists wear “two hats,” helping the legal staff investigate cases and provide evidence to support law enforcement cases while also providing advice to the legal bureaus and to the Commission on which cases to pursue (thus providing “a second set of eyes” to evaluate cases). There is sometimes a tension in those functions because building a case is not the same as evaluating a case. Economists and the Bureau of Economics have provided such services to the FTC for over 100 years proving that a sub-organization can survive while playing roles that sometimes conflict. Such a life is not, however, always easy or fun.

Details

Healthcare Antitrust, Settlements, and the Federal Trade Commission
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-599-9

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Article

Chris G. Collins and Pauline Joyce

The purpose of this paper is to summarise the recent debates and issues on the healthcare system in Ireland, which have come to the fore through media exposure. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarise the recent debates and issues on the healthcare system in Ireland, which have come to the fore through media exposure. The implications for these debates on quality are suggested and questions are raised to stimulate further debate.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent reports and media opinion articles are reviewed in the light of the health reform programme and the increased prosperity due to the Celtic Tiger era in Ireland.

Findings

The Health Service in Ireland is not what it should be. Progress has been made but resistance at all levels is significant due to the mistrust and miscommunication between the managerial and clinical personnel which have built up during the past number of years. The trust of the public is at an all‐time low. However, once patients are within the system they are satisfied with their care.

Originality/value

This is a discussion paper which raises more questions than answers and is timely with the focus on quality in healthcare, particularly now as Ireland prepares for a general election for a new government with healthcare a priority issue.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Celeste C. Wells, Rebecca Gill and James McDonald

– The purpose of this paper is to explore intersectionality as accomplished in interaction, and particularly national difference as a component of intersectionality.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore intersectionality as accomplished in interaction, and particularly national difference as a component of intersectionality.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use ethnographic, shadowing methods to examine intersectionality in-depth and developed vignettes to illuminate the experience of intersectionality.

Findings

National difference mitigated the common assumption in scientific work that tenure and education are the most important markers of acceptance and collegiality. Moreover, national difference was a more prominent driving occupational discourse in scientific work than gender.

Research limitations/implications

The data were limited in scope, though the authors see this as a necessity for generating in-depth intersectional data. Implications question the prominence of gender and (domestic) race/gender as “the” driving discourses of difference in much scholarship and offer a new view into how organizing around identity happens. Specifically, the authors develop “intersectional pairs” to understand the paradoxes of intersectionality, and as comprising a larger, woven experience of “intersectional netting.”

Social implications

This research draws critical attention to how assumptions regarding national difference shape workplace experiences, in an era of intensified global migration and immigration debates.

Originality/value

The study foregrounds the negotiation of national difference in US workplaces, and focusses on how organization around said difference happens interactively in communication.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article

Pauline Drury

The purpose of this paper is to consider the factors affecting the success of succession planning in family businesses.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the factors affecting the success of succession planning in family businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reports on a panel discussion in which the former chairman of the William Jackson Food Group describes the processes put in place to manage succession at this family firm and his own experience of handing over to his successor.

Findings

Once upon a time, saying that you were going into the family business marked the end of any career discussion. Now it’s just the beginning – interest in family firms has never been greater. Succession planning is a subject guaranteed to generate questions – everyone wants to know how to get it right. Fortunately, it’s an area where some are happy to share their experience.

Research limitations/implications

The paper highlights the need for more longitudinal research on family firms.

Practical implications

This paper provides a practical guide to structures and processes that can facilitate succession planning in family firms.

Social implications

It draws attention to the emotional and psychological impact of succession on the retiring individual and the need to create life structures to replace former business involvement.

Originality/value

This paper aims to present a frank discussion of the approach to succession planning taken by one family business and the broader research questions that it raises.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Trump Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-779-9

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Article

Fiona Collins and Janet McCray

This paper seeks to report on education, health, and social care practitioners' experiences of working across traditional boundaries and establishing new relationships in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report on education, health, and social care practitioners' experiences of working across traditional boundaries and establishing new relationships in the context of the Common Assessment Framework (CAF) in UK children's services.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with a total of 20 education, health and social care practitioners, and operational managers using the qualitative methodology of interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

The article highlights how change in the composition of teams has provided stimulus for new relationships, learning, and ways of working.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based upon a relatively small number of interviews conducted within one county.

Originality/value

Consideration of relationships and learning within multi‐agency practice contexts is underdeveloped within the literature. As new forms of partnership may result from ongoing reconfiguration of services, this research into partnership working around the CAF offers insights and learning for future interprofessional teamworking.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Pauline Dibben, Geoffrey Wood and Rachel O’Hara

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate existing evidence on whether return to work interventions achieve employment outcomes and are cost effective in order to better…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate existing evidence on whether return to work interventions achieve employment outcomes and are cost effective in order to better inform those needing accommodations at work, as well as their line managers and trade union representatives, occupational health specialists and HR managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a systematic narrative review to evaluate the evidence on the employment outcomes and cost effectiveness of return to work initiatives.

Findings

Evidence on interventions for musculoskeletal conditions such as lower back pain indicates that certain forms of intervention such as vocational rehabilitation and workplace-based rehabilitation facilitate outcomes such as employment, reduced sick leave and effective return to work. However, there is very little evidence on whether these interventions are cost effective. More generally there are glaring gaps in evidence on cardio-respiratory (heart and breathing) and mental health conditions with regard to both employment outcomes and the cost of interventions.

Research limitations/implications

This systematic review has critical and timely implications for both knowledge development and practice. While highlighting methodological limitations in the existing research base, it also presents avenues for further research on return work strategies and the factors inhibiting and facilitating their adoption and effective operation.

Originality/value

Although there is much existent literature on the return to work process, far less attention has been paid to the employment outcomes and cost effectiveness of interventions. This paper highlights the interventions for musculoskeletal conditions such as lower back conditions that may result in positive employment outcomes, with implications for practice. However, it also highlights gaps in evidence on the employment outcomes and cost effectiveness of interventions for cardio-respiratory (heart and breathing) and mental health conditions.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

There is something appealing about the idea of mentoring as a form of management development. In the fiercely competitive business world, the notion that a “wise or…

Abstract

There is something appealing about the idea of mentoring as a form of management development. In the fiercely competitive business world, the notion that a “wise or trusted advisor or guide” (to use the Collins English Dictionary definition) will be assigned to help young people who are breaking their free enterprise teeth, is attractive. Mentoring has become established, of course, for the highly pragmatic reason that organizations will gain some benefit from lessons learned by their emerging talents.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Book part

Milan Zafirovski

To reexamine the Weber Thesis pertaining to the relationship between ascetic Protestantism – especially Calvinism – and modern capitalism, as between an economic “spirit”…

Abstract

Purpose

To reexamine the Weber Thesis pertaining to the relationship between ascetic Protestantism – especially Calvinism – and modern capitalism, as between an economic “spirit” and an economic “structure,” in which the first is assumed to be the explanatory factor and the second the dependent variable.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter provides an attempt to combine theoretical-empirical and comparative-historical approaches to integrate theory with evidence supplied by societal comparisons and historically specific cases.

Findings

The chapter identifies the general sociological core of the Weber Thesis as a classic endeavor in economic sociology (and thus substantive sociological theory) and separates it from its particular historical dimension in the form of an empirical generalization from history. I argue that such a distinction helps to better understand the puzzling double “fate” of the Weber Thesis in social science, its status of a model in economic sociology and substantive sociological theory, on the one hand, and its frequent rejection in history and historical economics, on the other. The sociological core of the Thesis, postulating that religion, ideology, and culture generally deeply impact economy, has proved to be more valid, enduring, and even paradigmatic, as in economic sociology, than its historical component establishing a special causal linkage between Calvinism and other types of ascetic Protestantism and the “spirit” and “structure” of modern capitalism in Western society at a specific point in history.

Research limitations/implications

In addition to the two cases deviating from the Weber Thesis considered here, it is necessary to investigate and identify the validity of the Thesis with regard to concrete historical and empirical instances.

Originality/value

The chapter provides the first effort to systematically analyze and distinguish between the sociological core and the historical components of the Weber Thesis as distinct yet intertwined components.

Details

Social Theories of History and Histories of Social Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-219-6

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