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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Paula Phillips Carson, Patricia A. Lanier and Kerry David Carson

Through the application of Hirst’s “forms of knowledge” theory, it is shown that the Shakers’ nineteenth century management principles had many similarities to Deming’s…

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Abstract

Through the application of Hirst’s “forms of knowledge” theory, it is shown that the Shakers’ nineteenth century management principles had many similarities to Deming’s tenets. For example, Shakers were committed to perfection in work, taking their time in pursuit of quality. Training was accomplished through sharing community expertise, apprenticing, and rotating jobs. Also, equality and cooperation were encouraged among the “brothers” and “sisters.” This example of management history research provides a baseline from which management concepts can be understood and potential mistakes avoided.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Betty Birkenmeier, Paul Phillips Carson and Kerry D. Carson

The cornerstones of servant leadership theory (service, trust, credibility, and vision) were used to analyze how one of the most outstanding leaders of the twentieth…

Abstract

The cornerstones of servant leadership theory (service, trust, credibility, and vision) were used to analyze how one of the most outstanding leaders of the twentieth century, Jean Monnet, used his skills to solve difficult problems of regional and global dimensions. Many believe that this Frenchman possessed unusually astute leadership skills in guiding individuals and governments during critical times. His contributions during World Wars I and II were notable, but he is best remembered for his conception and instigation of the European Union. Known as the "Father of Europe," he became one of the most influential figures of the postwar era. Focusing on economic cooperation among European nations, he effectively used a quiet, behind the scenes approach, to advance his objectives.

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International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Paula Phillips Carson, Patricia A. Lanier, Kerry David Carson and Betty J. Birkenmeier

While management is considered relatively immature compared to other social sciences, for over half the lifespan of the discipline, the field has been bombarded with…

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2298

Abstract

While management is considered relatively immature compared to other social sciences, for over half the lifespan of the discipline, the field has been bombarded with “fads”. For the purposes of this manuscript, fads are defined as “managerial interventions which appear to be innovative, rational, and functional and are aimed at encouraging better organizational performance”. This definition draws on and integrates a number of theorists’ conceptualizations of fads. Notably, however, there is some point at which a fad sufficiently demonstrates its effectiveness in numerous and diverse settings to warrant an evolution from fad status to something which implies more permanence. This issue is addressed in a theoretical model which traces the process of fad adoption using historical bibliometric data. The model offers propositions concerning the precursors, moderators, and outcomes of adoption.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Paula Phillips Carson and Kerry D. Carson

Despite interest in management’s evolution, the discipline is devoid of systematic frameworks addressing historiography. Hence, Hirst’s (1965) theory of “forms of…

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1764

Abstract

Despite interest in management’s evolution, the discipline is devoid of systematic frameworks addressing historiography. Hence, Hirst’s (1965) theory of “forms of knowledge” is applied to demonstrate that management history satisfies his four criteria and qualifies as a valuable research domain. Hirst’s first criterion states that there must be certain central concepts that are distinctive to the subject. Management historians fulfill this criterion by investigating not only specific people, events and trends, but also topics such as motives and linguistics. Second, Hirst suggests that the discipline must offer distinctive ways of relating concepts. Management historians follow a unique investigatory process using three steps: investigation, synthesis, and interpretation. Third, there must be characteristic ways of adducing evidence in support of propositions. Historians define and refine by the available facts. The fourth criterion states that there be utilization of characteristic techniques for conducting investigations. Example methodologies include biographies and oral history. A fifth criterion, examining history’s pragmatic utility, is then advanced.

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Journal of Management History, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Blaise M. Sonnier, Kerry D. Carson and Paula Phillips Carson

The paper aims to evaluate 141 publicly traded US firms in the traditional sectors of the economy to assess intellectual capital disclosure levels.

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984

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to evaluate 141 publicly traded US firms in the traditional sectors of the economy to assess intellectual capital disclosure levels.

Design/methodology/approach

Content analysis was conducted using 10‐K annual reports.

Findings

It was found that traditional sector companies had a mean disclosure of intellectual capital of 24.227 in fiscal year 2000 and 27.709 in fiscal year 2004 (t=3.68, df = 140, p=0.01). This supported the authors hypothesis that traditional sector companies would show an increase in the level of intellectual capital disclosure in 2004 as compared to 2000. Within the total sample, 78 companies increased their intellectual capital disclosure in fiscal year 2004 as compared to fiscal year 2000 (z=−3.4756, p=0.01).

Research limitations/implications

While the authors generated 121 phrases to tap the intellectual capital construct, there may be other word combinations given the differences in vocabulary between academia and the corporate world.

Practical implications

These findings are particularly noteworthy because traditional sector companies are capital intensive and are reliant upon fixed assets which are reported on the balance sheet. This study suggests that even managers in the traditional sectors of the US economy are coming to recognize the growing importance of intellectual capital.

Originality/value

This is the only longitudinal study to focus on intellectual capital disclosure of traditional firms in the USA, and this research was conducted over the time that the Financial Accounting Standards Board called for increased disclosure of intangible assets.

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Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Patricia Lanier Pence, Paula Phillips Carson, Kerry D. Carson, J. Brooke Hamilton and Betty Birkenmeier

Suggests that the Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire in New York City in 1911 was the veritable genesis of laws safeguarding workers. The events of the 18‐minute inferno…

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Abstract

Suggests that the Triangle Shirtwaist factory fire in New York City in 1911 was the veritable genesis of laws safeguarding workers. The events of the 18‐minute inferno which killed 146 young, immigrant garment workers are summarized, as are the factory owners’ responses to the fire, along with the rationalizations they used to defend their lethal actions, which included moral justification, accusing the accuser, blaming the victim, advantageous comparison, responsibility displacement, responsibility diffusion, dehumanization, and blame attribution. Reviews workplace reforms initiated as a direct result of this fire and discusses why such historical disasters are unlikely to re‐occur if three simple lessons are heeded: first, it is unfortunate that it has required major trauma or carnage to awaken the public to the realities of existing dangers; second, mere compliance with existing statutes is often insufficient for protecting workers; and third, organizations which fail to self‐monitor will often be subjected to external control and regulation.

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Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Melissa Husbands and Jerome Carson

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that student-led case studies are an important way to learn about mental health problems and to highlight this by presenting a case…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest that student-led case studies are an important way to learn about mental health problems and to highlight this by presenting a case study of the comedic genius Spike Milligan.

Design/methodology/approach

Celebrities live their lives in the public eye. In recent years, many have talked about their struggles with mental health. This paper is based on a student-led case study of the celebrity Spike Milligan.

Findings

This case study suggests one previously under-emphasised issue and argues that Spike Milligan’s wartime experiences may have led to post-traumatic stress disorder. Second, that he may have developed neuro-inflammation, through contracting sandfly fever during the war. This could have been an additional trigger for bipolar disorder.

Research limitations/implications

While this is a single case study, it draws on a wide variety of research sources to back up the arguments advanced.

Practical implications

Student-led case studies provide a way of engaging students more actively with mental health problems.

Social implications

Mental illness is complex, if not more complex, than physical health problems. Case studies of celebrities like Spike Milligan can help develop a public understanding of mental illness, as they already have a working knowledge about the person.

Originality/value

The case study illustrates how Bipolar 1 disorder is a complex and unique condition and that every individual’s illness has different predisposing characteristics. It suggests that student-led case studies are a helpful learning tool.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems…

Abstract

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined to replace the XT and AT models that are the mainstay of the firm's current personal computer offerings. The numerous changes in hardware and software, while representing improvements on previous IBM technology, will require users purchasing additional computers to make difficult choices as to which of the two IBM architectures to adopt.

Details

M300 and PC Report, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0743-7633

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