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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Paula Caligiuri and Ibraiz Tarique

In this chapter we examine the individual-level accelerators of global leadership development as they affect the acquisition of cross-cultural competencies through both…

Abstract

In this chapter we examine the individual-level accelerators of global leadership development as they affect the acquisition of cross-cultural competencies through both cross-cultural training and developmental cross-cultural experiences. Individuals’ cognitive ability, prior knowledge, and personality traits will accelerate the knowledge they gain from cross-cultural training. Their personality characteristics, language skills, motivation, and prior experience will facilitate the development of cross-cultural competencies from high-quality international experiences. We highlight an aptitude × treatment interaction approach whereby the level of a given individual-level attribute affects how global leaders will respond to instructional methods, cross-cultural experiences, or developmental opportunities. The chapter suggests that global leaders’ individual differences can accelerate (or possibly impede) the developmental gains in their cross-cultural competencies.

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Paula Caligiuri, Nataliya Baytalskaya and Mila B Lazarova

For decades, expatriate scholars have understood that the individual factors of cultural humility and ethnocentrism and the contextual factors of feedback and support…

Abstract

Purpose

For decades, expatriate scholars have understood that the individual factors of cultural humility and ethnocentrism and the contextual factors of feedback and support affect expatriates’ outcomes. The study, rooted in the observation that great advice and support are often ignored by expatriates, seeks to uncover why. Based in the humility literature, the authors test whether individual differences interact with support to affect expatriate performance. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed a matched sample of 62 expatriates and their supervisors from one multinational organization.

Findings

The study found that expatriates higher in cultural humility benefit more from the support and feedback offered in the host national work environment which, in turn, facilitates better supervisor ratings of performance. The authors also found that expatriates’ ethnocentrism has a direct negative influence on their ratings of performance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings in the study are focussed and robust, but tested within a single organization. That said, the authors believe the results have implications for expatriate selection and for ways to manage the host national environment to improve expatriate performance.

Originality/value

The study joins the research conversation on how expatriates’ individual differences interact with the environments in which they are placed to affect their success. This study also underscores the importance of humility in the global professional context.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Paula Caligiuri, Mila Lazarova and Stephan Zehetbauer

Using a sample of 76 US‐based multinational firms, this study tests two hypotheses: whether top management teams' national diversity, and the number of countries of…

Abstract

Using a sample of 76 US‐based multinational firms, this study tests two hypotheses: whether top management teams' national diversity, and the number of countries of operation worldwide are related to other established indicators of internationalization. Results suggest that both hypothesized indicators are aspects of the nomological network for a firm's internationalization.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Debra L. Franko, Jan Rinehart, Kathleen Kenney, Mary Loeffelholz, Barbara Guthrie and Paula Caligiuri

Mentoring of junior faculty members (i.e. professors) in higher education has been documented to be critical to their academic success which most often takes the form of…

Abstract

Purpose

Mentoring of junior faculty members (i.e. professors) in higher education has been documented to be critical to their academic success which most often takes the form of receiving tenure and/or promotion to higher academic ranks at universities in the USA. A “junior faculty member” would be defined as someone who has not yet been tenured or promoted and is usually within the first five years of their academic appointment. However, mentoring relationships can sometimes be difficult to build and momentum for continuous mentoring throughout the pre-tenure period can be a challenge to maintain. One of the concerns identified by mentees is the importance of regular meetings with mentors and the concomitant difficulty of knowing what to address in these meetings so as to make them productive and helpful. Mentors, most often senior faculty members, note that they do not always know the most relevant issues to discuss with junior faculty during mentoring meetings. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In an effort to address these issues, the authors describe here the development of using creative technology to support a new mentoring system that provides structured prompts and reminders to both mentors and mentees and uses tools to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the mentoring relationship.

Findings

This paper highlights a pilot program, describing the rationale for and stages in the development of an e-mail-based and mobile-based program to improve the quality of mentoring for junior faculty at one higher education institution. Focus group data provided by stakeholders (e.g. faculty, department chairs, and associate deans) are provided.

Originality/value

Professional development and academic success for junior faculty members may be strengthened by greater attention to formal mentoring strategies such as the one described here.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Abstract

Details

Global Leadership Talent Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-543-6

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Jan Selmer

Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2016

Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-138-8

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