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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2018

Paul Frank Wilkinson

2269

Abstract

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Irene Mateos Rodriguez, Saba Syed, Paul Wilkinson and Charlotte Tulinius

During the COVID-19 outbreak, clinical schools across the UK were forced to switch their learning from face-to-face to online platforms. This paper aims to describe the…

Abstract

Purpose

During the COVID-19 outbreak, clinical schools across the UK were forced to switch their learning from face-to-face to online platforms. This paper aims to describe the experiences of psychiatry teachers and medical students at Cambridge University of the online psychiatry case-based tutorials during the COVID-19 outbreak and the lessons learned from this implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted qualitative focus groups with students followed by in-depth individual interviews with students and teachers.

Findings

In a data-led systematic text condensation analysis, this study found seven themes: the COVID-19 context, the structure of the course, teachers’ educational ethos, beyond the (teaching) script, possibilities for learning or teaching reflective practice, attitudes to online learning and suggestions for future development. The authors then applied the normalisation process theory (NPT) as the theoretical frame of reference. This model has previously been applied to the implementation of telemedicine in psychiatry, to understand how new technology can become embedded in clinical care.

Originality/value

This study’s results show how the NPT model can be modified to support the delivery of medical education online, including reflective learning and practice as an iterative process at every stage of the implementation and delivery of the teaching.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Emanuele Felice Osimo, Lydia Mariner and Paul Wilkinson

In previous research, personality and exposure to psychiatry were independently shown to shape medical students attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP). This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

In previous research, personality and exposure to psychiatry were independently shown to shape medical students attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP). This paper aims to investigate the role of psychiatry placements and personality types on medical student attitudes towards psychiatry (ATP).

Design/methodology/approach

All medical students from four consecutive years at Cambridge University, UK were invited to take part in an online questionnaire including the ATP-30 Questionnaire and The Big Five Factor personality Inventory (BFI).

Findings

Students who had completed their psychiatry placement had more positive ATP than students who had not (t = −3.24, adjusted p = 0.004). However, this was not reflected in an increased self-reported likelihood of choosing psychiatry as a career (t = 0.28, adjusted p = 0.78). Higher agreeable personality scores were associated with both a higher willingness to take up psychiatry as a career (linear model estimate 0.06; p = 0.03), and more positive ATP (linear model estimate 0.14; p < 0.0001).

Originality/value

This work seems to confirm that exposure to psychiatry improves attitudes towards psychiatry. Agreeable personality traits were also associated with a higher willingness to take up psychiatry postgraduate training. These findings might help shape future campaigns to improve the profile of psychiatry training. Future research on this topic is needed to address whether improved ATP among medical students can longitudinally improve recruitment into post-graduate psychiatry training.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Magda El‐Sherbini

Terrorism is not a new phenomenon in human life. It existed during Biblical times when Joseph, the seventeen‐year‐old son of Jacob, was kidnapped and sold into slavery by…

Abstract

Terrorism is not a new phenomenon in human life. It existed during Biblical times when Joseph, the seventeen‐year‐old son of Jacob, was kidnapped and sold into slavery by his jealous brothers. Although terrorists have been active throughout history, it is only recently that we have seen an increase in scholarly interest in the phenomenon of terrorism. One reason for this is the fact that terrorist activities have increased dramatically since the 1960s. Everyday we read in the newspapers and hear on radio and television details of the latest terrorist outrage. Many American colleges and universities now offer a course or two on terrorism as a part of their curriculum.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Raj Kumar Kothari and Priyanka Bhaduri

In the post-9/11 period, tackling the vertical and horizontal growth of international terrorism has become a major challenge for the international community, more…

Abstract

In the post-9/11 period, tackling the vertical and horizontal growth of international terrorism has become a major challenge for the international community, more pertinently for the liberal states. About three decades ago, Paul Wilkinson wrote a book entitled Terrorism and the Liberal State in which he made a hypothetical statement that the liberal states in today’s world were more vulnerable to terrorist attacks and threats than any other political system. Totalitarian societies do not provide any space to terrorism in view of the fact that this system does not recognize the importance of civil societies. However, the point to be noted is that in today’s globalized international order, terrorist activities are not only confined within the territory of liberal societies alone, rather it has engulfed many parts of the globe that includes non-liberal societies as well. Therefore, strengthening democratic regimes and values is not the solution to abolish terrorism. In this context, this chapter attempts to test Wilkinson’s propositions that liberal states are more vulnerable to terrorism than any other political system by making a comparative study between democratic and non-democratic regimes to identify the recent trends of terrorism.

Details

The Impact of Global Terrorism on Economic and Political Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-919-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

A. Mavrogianni, M. Davies, P. Wilkinson and A. Pathan

Climate change presents potential increased threats to the comfort and health of urban populations as a result of higher summer temperatures. This paper reviews recent…

Abstract

Climate change presents potential increased threats to the comfort and health of urban populations as a result of higher summer temperatures. This paper reviews recent research on the climate change adaptation potential of urban environments and focuses on a major conurbation, London. Recent work relating to the impact of exposure to heat on population health is also noted. Data obtained from a pilot monitoring study carried out in a subset of 36 dwellings (from a total of 110 dwellings in the overall study) across London during the summer of 2009 is then discussed. Preliminary results illustrate the need to quantify the net impacts of individual building characteristics and the location of each dwelling within the London heat island. During a hot period, more than 40% of the monitored bedrooms failed the recommended overheating criteria during the night time. There was some indication of purpose built flats being more prone to overheating. The potential use of such data as the basis of a heat-related health risk epidemiological model for London is discussed. Such a tool would help health policy makers to target the most vulnerable building types and areas.

Details

Open House International, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 May 2014

Julie Still and Zara Wilkinson

The purpose of this paper is to address the use of librarians as a study population in social science research outside of the field of library and information science…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the use of librarians as a study population in social science research outside of the field of library and information science. Additionally, it aims to make general claims about how frequently librarians have been studied compared to other occupations, as well as to identify and describe existing research that has used librarians as a study population.

Design/methodology/approach

The described study had two parts. Two social science databases were searched using the subject headings “librarians” and eight additional occupations, and the results for all nine occupations were analyzed. The peer-reviewed results for “librarians” were then coded by content. The articles that used librarians as a study population were identified, reviewed and described.

Findings

Although librarians, as an occupational group, possess many characteristics that should make them an ideal choice for social science research, they seem to be studied less frequently than other occupations.

Research limitations/implications

Other occupational groups, such as mathematicians, were also studied infrequently. Further research might consider, more broadly, why some occupations are studied more frequently than others. Future studies might also compare librarianship to other female-dominated professions, such as nursing and education. Additionally, the subject heading “librarians” was applied to articles that studied non-professional library employees, making it difficult to isolate only articles with a focus on degreed librarians.

Originality/value

Few other studies have examined social science research in which librarians are used as the study population. By focusing on how librarians are studied and written about in other fields, this paper will add to the body of literature on the professional image of librarians.

Details

Library Review, vol. 63 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Zara Wilkinson

52

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Zara Wilkinson

60

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Paul N. Wilkinson

Gives a personal view of the realities of applying marketing theory in practical fast‐moving consumer goods environments. Relates the author’s experiences over many…

2598

Abstract

Gives a personal view of the realities of applying marketing theory in practical fast‐moving consumer goods environments. Relates the author’s experiences over many product categories and companies to draw some lessons for improving success.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

Keywords

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