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Article

Paul Walsh

The purpose of this paper is to examine why and how firms adopt less‐than‐perfect surrogate measures and, in extreme cases, dumb down measures to support strategic scorecards.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine why and how firms adopt less‐than‐perfect surrogate measures and, in extreme cases, dumb down measures to support strategic scorecards.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a taxonomy to classify the different types of surrogate measures and workarounds are suggested for evaluating performance when surrogate measures are present.

Findings

The use of low investment surrogate measures is tempting when firms face the prospect of measuring strategic objectives, especially around intangible assets. Current approaches tend to be ad hoc and would benefit from being more systematic.

Practical implications

The approach enables firms to recognise the potential for dumb measures, suggest workarounds and improve current practice for managing with less relevant measures.

Originality/value

The taxonomy and workarounds presented provide greater rigour, insight and legitimacy to the use of surrogate measures in scorecards.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

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Article

Nicholas O'Regan and Abby Ghobadian

The purpose of this paper is to explore, from a practical point‐of‐view, a number of key strategic issues that critically influence organisations' competitiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore, from a practical point‐of‐view, a number of key strategic issues that critically influence organisations' competitiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a semi‐structured interview with Mr Paul Walsh, CEO of Diageo. Diageo is a highly successful company and Mr Walsh has played a central role in making Diageo the number one branded drink company in the world.

Findings

The paper discusses the key attributes of successful merger, lessons from a complex cross boarder acquisition, rationale for strategic alliance with competitors, distinctive resources, and the role of corporate social responsibility.

Research limitations/implications

It is not too often that management scholars have the opportunity to discuss with the CEOs of large multinationals the rational of key strategic decisions. In this paper these issues are explored from the perspective of a CEO of a large and successful company. The lessons, while not generalisable, offer unique insights to students of management and management researchers.

Originality/value

The paper offers a bridge between theory and practice. It demonstrates that from Diageo's perspective the distinctive capabilities are intangible. It also offers insight into how to successfully execute strategic decision. In terms of originality it offers a view from the top, which is often missing from strategy research.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

Keywords

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Article

Martin Sposato, Simon Feeke, Paul Anderson-Walsh and Linbert Spencer

Presents organizations with issues to consider regarding inclusion and its importance as well as a well-established index that companies can join in order to make sure…

Abstract

Purpose

Presents organizations with issues to consider regarding inclusion and its importance as well as a well-established index that companies can join in order to make sure that equality is not a mere policy but that it counts in reality in every organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Describes the power that an organization can derive from deliberately nurturing and integrating heterogeneous groups of people so that they fit together.

Findings

Explains that the best way for an organization to succeed is to combine employee knowledge, skills, judgment and attitudes, alongside fair treatment.

Practical implications

Provides details of an index that aims to measure the efforts of organizations to tackle discrimination and create an inclusive workplace for lesbian, gay and bisexual employees.

Social implications

Reveals that the method of the index should allow organizations already successfully implementing diversity strategies acknowledgement while, at the same time, providing inspiration to those beginning to tackle diversity.

Originality/value

Demonstrates that diversifying the workforce must be accompanied by inclusivity and equality in order to triumph.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article

Paul Walsh

TQM has its share of critics who are always quick to highlight thenumber of companies abandoning TQM programmes. When TQM fails, we callthis a case of chronic TQM fatigue…

Abstract

TQM has its share of critics who are always quick to highlight the number of companies abandoning TQM programmes. When TQM fails, we call this a case of chronic TQM fatigue. Outlines typical symptoms. Suggests two ways an organization can prevent the onset of chronic fatigue. Concludes that these two remedies supplement the bottom‐up approaches to TQM that are commonly prescribed.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article

Robert Loew, Udo Bleimann and Paul Walsh

This paper proposes a new paradigm to overcome many problems in the area of information technology involving communication between humans. The paradigm will be exemplified…

Abstract

This paper proposes a new paradigm to overcome many problems in the area of information technology involving communication between humans. The paradigm will be exemplified using the example of knowledge transfer within a company. The solution is not interaction between a user and a highly intelligent system, but communication between people, supported by intelligent systems. The paper's concept of the “knowledge broker” will clarify what the authors mean by man‐man communication. The basic idea of the knowledge broker is that of a hybrid man‐machine system that enables knowledge transfer within companies not only theoretically, but also in practice.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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Article

Robert Loew, Katrin Kuemmel, Judith Ruprecht, Udo Bleimann and Paul Walsh

The purpose of this paper is to describe new search methods based on semantic information structures to offer a personalised and interactive knowledge retrieval to the user.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe new search methods based on semantic information structures to offer a personalised and interactive knowledge retrieval to the user.

Design/methodology/approach

A careful look on existing “knowledge management projects” leads to a proposed approach of a “knowledge broker network” where transfer of knowledge is based on communication between humans. To enhance the quality of search results a new search algorithm (“Search Assistance Algorithm (SAA)”) is described in a simplified manner.

Findings

The paper provides information on the knowledge broker network and shows the advantages of this concept especially of the automated part.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows the proposed approach has not formally being tested yet. Some pilot studies have been made and a study especially for the SAA is planned for the near future.

Practical implications

This approach has the potential to change the way of transfer of knowledge using a knowledge broker network based on knowledge management systems, which could be improved by our SAA in practice.

Originality/value

Using knowledge management systems in a “standard way” by feeding in information and using retrieval methods is not optimal for sharing knowledge between humans. To provide and update information is very cost‐intensive. Using “meta‐information” about “who is expert in which area” and bring information‐seeker and experts together could be the optimal method. This knowledge broker network helps to bring this idea into reality.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article

Neil Hardie and Paul Walsh

Several different operational definitions of quality are commonly usedin industry. The existence of these different definitions can causeconfusion unless their…

Abstract

Several different operational definitions of quality are commonly used in industry. The existence of these different definitions can cause confusion unless their relationships to each other are understood. Offers an explanation of the relationships between those definitions which are based on fitness for purpose, conformance and satisfaction of their customers. It does this by considering the individual transaction as the key element in the generation of quality; and showing how each definition corresponds to a relation between a pair of stages in the transaction. Develops a model of quality from this analysis, and shows how this model can be used to analyse the quality of business operations.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article

Jenny Kwai‐Sim Leung, Kieran James, Razvan V. Mustata and Carmen Giorgiana Bonaci

The purpose of this paper is to document key elements of union strategy at Sydney (Lidcombe) branch of Australia's Construction Forestry Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document key elements of union strategy at Sydney (Lidcombe) branch of Australia's Construction Forestry Mining and Energy Union (CFMEU) in an attempt to document and critique its branch level strategy in the year immediately after the removal of the Howard‐Costello Government.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is used in analysing data obtained from internal CFMEU documents and correspondence; interviews with the New South Wales State Secretary of the CFMEU Andrew Ferguson, union organisers, one former organiser who worked for a number of years at Western Sydney but is now with a white‐collar union in the education sector, and construction workers; CFMEU official publications; news media stories and a series of building site visits. The authors use a theory framework of Roman Catholic social teaching to frame the discussions and analyze the case study findings.

Findings

In focus groups with construction workers, the authors find one challenging external constraint for the CFMEU: reaching out to and meeting effectively the needs of younger workers especially those from families hostile to unionism. However, younger workers seem to hold a mix of individualistic and collectivist philosophies. The final case shows the CFMEU organiser Tulloch to be adaptable and flexible in the heat of industrial disputation. Finally, the fact that building workers brought the asbestos issue to CFMEU's attention in the final case study shows union willingness to pursue issues not initiated by the union.

Originality/value

The paper documents the fact that the CFMEU has the ability and potential to rebuild its influence on building sites in Sydney and win further favourable outcomes for exploited and vulnerable workers within its sphere of influence. Through the theoretical framework, the authors point that as it does so it will assist in bringing to fruition the Roman Catholic social teaching that presents strong trade unions as a valid form of collective voice for workers and a way for collective and individual labour to retain in practice the dignity that God has already clothed them with.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 70 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

Paul Walsh

While the need to set targets has been widely discussed in the TQM, benchmarking and re‐engineering literature, guidance aimed at helping management report and interpret…

Abstract

While the need to set targets has been widely discussed in the TQM, benchmarking and re‐engineering literature, guidance aimed at helping management report and interpret performance against targets has been fragmented. Very little literature has appeared that brings together our current state of knowledge on performance targets and suitable methodologies. This paper attempts to compensate for this shortfall by first explaining the three major forms that targets assume and then presenting four methods that are useful when assessing performance in each case. The three forms are first, the target is a single lower limit; second, the target is a single upper limit; and third, the target is a zone between an upper and a lower limit. The four methods to calculate the level of improvement needed to reach target are the counting, distance, histogram and capability index methods. While individually each method cannot be claimed to be new, the contribution of this paper lies in their integration, which has not been presented in such a comprehensive way before.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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