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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Paul W. Hyland, Jose F.B. Gieskes and Terrence R. Sloan

The importance of innovation to the survival of organisations in a turbulent environment has led to greater emphasis on improving the innovation process. Where learning is…

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1425

Abstract

The importance of innovation to the survival of organisations in a turbulent environment has led to greater emphasis on improving the innovation process. Where learning is captured and applied to existing and current innovation processes, the opportunity exists for improvement in innovation processes. Research has been undertaken with the objective of developing, testing and disseminating a methodology to facilitate product innovation. Presents an analysis of clusters of learning behaviours and identifies variations between different occupational clusters. Examines aspects of occupational culture and problems associated with examining organisations learning from a single perspective.

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Mario Ferrer, Ricardo Santa, Paul W. Hyland and Phil Bretherton

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the types of relationships that exist along the supply chain and the capabilities that are needed to manage…

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3238

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the types of relationships that exist along the supply chain and the capabilities that are needed to manage them effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

This is exploratory research as there has been little empirical research into this area. Quantitative data were gathered by using a self‐administered questionnaire, using the Australian road freight industry as the context. There were 132 usable responses. Inferential and descriptive analysis, including factor analysis, confirmatory factor and regression analysis was used to examine the predictive power of relational factors in inter‐firm relationships.

Findings

Three factors were identified as having significant influence on relationships: sharing, power and interdependency. “Sharing” is the willingness of the organisation to share resources with other members of the supply chain. “Power” relates to exercising control based on experience, knowledge and position in the supply chain. “Interdependency” is the relative levels of dependency along the supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

The research only looks at the Australian road freight industry; a wider sample including other industries would help to strengthen the generalisability of the findings.

Practical implications

When these factors are correlated to the types of relationship, arm's length, cooperation, collaboration and alliances, managerial implications can be identified. The more road freight businesses place importance on power, the less they will cooperate. The greater the importance of sharing and interdependency, the greater is the likelihood of arm's length relationships.

Originality/value

This paper makes a contribution by describing empirical work conducted in an under‐researched but important area – supply chain relationships in the Australian road freight industry.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

José F.B. Gieskes, Paul W. Hyland and Mats G. Magnusson

An increasing share of manufacturing, logistics and R&D activities takes place today in a number of geographically dispersed organisational units. The units involved can…

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2111

Abstract

An increasing share of manufacturing, logistics and R&D activities takes place today in a number of geographically dispersed organisational units. The units involved can be different autonomous companies or a number of focused subsidiaries. Using the CIMA‐methodology and its computerised questionnaire as an analysis and action research tool, organisational learning in distributed product development projects at a multinational company in the telecom industry has been investigated. Organisational units with different operational focuses displayed differences in the types of learning to which attention was primarily given. Based on the findings, the role of communities of practice in distributed product development is investigated.

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 14 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Charles E. O’Mara, Paul W. Hyland and Ross L. Chapman

Performance measurement systems not only provide the data necessary for managers to control business activity, they also influence the behavior and decisions of managers…

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4736

Abstract

Performance measurement systems not only provide the data necessary for managers to control business activity, they also influence the behavior and decisions of managers. This being the case, a restrictive set of financial performance measures may adversely impact on an organization’s long‐term viability, so organizations should develop a broad range of performance measures. Berliner and Brimson state that “performance measurement is a key factor in ensuring the successful implementation of a company’s strategy”. Thus when organizations implement new strategies they should ensure that the appropriate set of performance measures are in place. In this paper we look at two case studies conducted in a medium‐sized manufacturing firm and a large manufacturing firm, and evaluate the managers’ perceptions of the strategy/performance measurement relationship, and the responsiveness of performance measures to changes in strategy.

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Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Ross L. Chapman and Paul W. Hyland

Notes that Australian businesses are continually being expected to respond to changes in the economy brought about by alterations to government policies. Suggests that…

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4113

Abstract

Notes that Australian businesses are continually being expected to respond to changes in the economy brought about by alterations to government policies. Suggests that those industries which survive and flourish will need to have in place a process for responding to change. Points out that continuous improvement (CI) was identified in a recent Australia/New Zealand manufacturing survey as the most important manufacturing enhancement process currently available. In 1997, an Australia‐wide study of CI in manufacturing was initiated by a benchmarking survey examining the CI activities of medium to large manufacturing firms. Reports on selected findings of the survey and presents an analysis by industry sector of the firms’ main motives for CI, content in the CI process, support for CI and problem‐solving tools used to support CI. Initial findings indicate that there are no significant differences between manufacturing organizations in different Australian states. However, significant differences were found on comparing different industry sectors.

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Benchmarking for Quality Management & Technology, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1351-3036

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Claudine A. Soosay, Paul W. Hyland and Mario Ferrer

The purpose of this study is to investigate how collaborative relationships enhance continuous innovation in the supply chain using case studies.

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16661

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how collaborative relationships enhance continuous innovation in the supply chain using case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from semi‐structured interviews with 23 managers in ten case studies. The main intention was to comprehend how these firms engaged in collaborative relationships and their importance for successful innovation. The study adopted a qualitative approach to investigating these factors.

Findings

The findings demonstrate how differing relationships can impact on the operation of firms and their capacities to innovate. The ability to work together with partners has enabled firms to integrate and link operations for increased effectiveness as well as embark on both radical and incremental innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The research into the initiatives and strategies for collaboration was essentially exploratory. A qualitative approach using case studies acknowledged that the responses from managers were difficult to quantify or gauge the extent of these factors.

Practical implications

The findings have shown various methods where firms integrated with customers and suppliers in the supply chain. This was evident in the views of managers across all the firms examined, supporting the importance of collaboration and efficient allocation of resources throughout the supply chain. They were able to set procedures in their dealings with partners, sharing knowledge and processes, and subsequently joint‐planning and investing with them for better operations, systems and processes in the supply chain.

Originality/value

The case studies serve as examples for managers in logistics organisation who are contemplating strategies and issues on collaborative relationships. The study provides important lessons on how such relationships can impact on the operation of firms and their capability to innovate.

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Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Paul W. Hyland, Claudine Soosay and Terrence R. Sloan

This paper reports on research into continuous improvement and learning in logistics. It is generally acknowledged that in today's dynamic and turbulent environment, firms…

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4246

Abstract

This paper reports on research into continuous improvement and learning in logistics. It is generally acknowledged that in today's dynamic and turbulent environment, firms have to develop capabilities that allow them to be very flexible and agile, and at the same time, be able to incorporate new (product and process) technologies that enable them to develop and exploit better practices in supply chains. This flexibility and agility calls for companies to increase their effectiveness, exploit synergies, and learn throughout all areas of their operations. This research extends a model developed by Australian and European researchers who examined learning in the product innovation process. The research developed a model of continuous innovation in the product development process and a methodology for mapping learning behaviours (termed the CIMA methodology) that was the starting point for this project. This paper focuses on ten case studies of Australian and Singaporean companies operating distribution centres.

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International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Maree Storer, Paul Hyland, Mario Ferrer, Ricardo Santa and Andrew Griffiths

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically, an industry development paradox, using embryonic literature in the area of strategic supply chain management, together…

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2935

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically, an industry development paradox, using embryonic literature in the area of strategic supply chain management, together with innovation management literature. This study seeks to understand how, forming strategic supply chain relationships, and developing strategic supply chain capability, influences beneficial supply chain outcomes expected from utilizing industry-led innovation, in the form of electronic business solutions using the internet, in the Australian beef industry. Findings should add valuable insights to both academics and practitioners in the fields of supply chain innovation management and strategic supply chain management, and expand knowledge to current literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a quantitative study comparing innovative and non-innovative supply chain operatives in the Australian beef industry, through factor analysis and structural equation modeling using PAWS Statistical V18 and AMOS V18 to analyze survey data from 412 respondents from the Australian beef supply chain.

Findings

Key findings are that both innovative and non-innovative supply chain operators attribute supply chain synchronization as only a minor indicator of strategic supply chain capability, contrary to the literature; and they also indicate strategic supply chain capability has a minor influence in achieving beneficial outcomes from utilizing industry-led innovation. These results suggest a lack of coordination between supply chain operatives in the industry. They also suggest a lack of understanding of the benefits of developing a strategic supply chain management competence, particularly in relation to innovation agendas, and provides valuable insights as to why an industry paradox exists in terms of the level of investment in industry-led innovation, vs the level of corresponding benefit achieved.

Research limitations/implications

Results are not generalized due to the single agribusiness industry studied and the single research method employed. However, this provides opportunity for further agribusiness studies in this area and also studies using alternate methods, such as qualitative, in-depth analysis of these factors and their relationships, which may confirm results or produce different results. Further, this study empirically extends existing theoretical contributions and insights into the roles of strategic supply chain management and innovation management in improving supply chain and ultimately industry performance while providing practical insights to supply chain practitioners in this and other similar agribusiness industries.

Practical implications

These findings confirm results from a 2007 research (Ketchen et al., 2007) which suggests supply chain practice and teachings need to take a strategic direction in the twenty-first century. To date, competence in supply chain management has built up from functional and process orientations rather than from a strategic perspective. This study confirms that there is a need for more generalists that can integrate with various disciplines, particularly those who can understand and implement strategic supply chain management.

Social implications

Possible social implications accrue through the development of responsible government policy in terms of industry supply chains. Strategic supply chain management and supply chain innovation management have impacts to the social fabric of nations through the sustainability of their industries, especially agribusiness industries which deal with food safety and security. If supply chains are now the competitive weapon of nations then funding innovation and managing their supply chain competitiveness in global markets requires a strategic approach from everyone, not just the industry participants.

Originality/value

This is original empirical research, seeking to add value to embryonic and important developing literature concerned with adopting a strategic approach to supply chain management. It also seeks to add to existing literature in the area of innovation management, particularly through greater understanding of the implications of nations developing industry-wide, industry-led innovation agendas, and their ramifications to industry supply chains.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Graydon Davison and Paul Hyland

This paper is the first in a series that will examine the management of innovation by cross‐functional, multi‐disciplinary patient care teams in a palliative care…

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1085

Abstract

This paper is the first in a series that will examine the management of innovation by cross‐functional, multi‐disciplinary patient care teams in a palliative care environment. This highly innovative environment is singularly focused on relieving the suffering of patients and their socially related carers during an end of life experience. The singular focus enables and encourages palliative care practitioners to break through and diminish or accommodate professionally‐based paradigm conflicts and organisational politics. This facilitates collaborative team‐based efforts, including the patient and the patient’s social support group, to address the multi‐causal uncertainties that characterise end of life in palliative care. The continuous innovation model used in the European Union funded CIMA project is used as a starting point for this research. While many businesses have struggled to implement self‐regulating teams and have invested considerable resources in attempting to gain some advantage from teamwork it appears palliative care professionals have adopted self‐regulating work teams in a highly uncertain environment as the most suitable human resource structure and practice.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 January 2020

Matthew Conner and Leah Plocharczyk

Abstract

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Libraries and Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-385-3

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