Search results

1 – 10 of 56
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2009

Elizabeth Chacko and Paul Varghese

Gated communities, residential enclaves that offer upscale housing and a variety of recreational and communal facilities within a walled area with controlled entrances…

Abstract

Gated communities, residential enclaves that offer upscale housing and a variety of recreational and communal facilities within a walled area with controlled entrances, are proliferating in many of India's large metropolitan cities. In this paper, we analyze the images of place and identity that are evoked in online advertisements for gated communities in the city of Bangalore in southern India. Since the 1990s, Bangalore has become known as India's premier information technology (IT) hub and a magnet for multinational corporations and high-skill personnel. The latter include Non-Resident Indians (NRIs) who lived and worked abroad for several years and have returned to partake of new opportunities offered in the country. We explore the intersection of notions of identity, home and community in a globalised world through an examination of the graphic and textual images encoded in the advertisements of thirteen prominent developers in Bangalore whose upscale gated developments cater to NRIs. The advertisements depict high-end gated communities as places of luxury, exclusiveness, high security and convenience which also offer a range of recreational facilities for individuals and families. Additionally, those who live in the gated enclaves are portrayed as persons of distinction and class who are global and cosmopolitan in their outlook and identity.

Details

Open House International, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Javier Ibañez‐Guzmán and Andrew A. Malcolm

This paper explores the technologies necessary for the development of autonomous ground vehicles to be used in the construction process. Consideration is given to the…

Abstract

This paper explores the technologies necessary for the development of autonomous ground vehicles to be used in the construction process. Consideration is given to the technological challenges to be resolved for the machines to evolve in an almost unstructured environment. The paper includes sample cases of current applications and examines future perspectives on the use of these devices. Emphasis is placed on the collaborative aspects that need to be developed between man and machine in order to make effective use of these resources on site.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Marie Paul Dusingize and Venantie Nyiransabimana

This case study was designed using the qualitative research method of interviews with key employees to investigate university social responsibility (USR) practices within…

Abstract

This case study was designed using the qualitative research method of interviews with key employees to investigate university social responsibility (USR) practices within Institut Catholique de Kabgayi (ICK) in Rwanda and to advance understanding of ways USR is defined against a postgenocide history, to identify its core components, and to track how it is communicated. Key respondents in accordance with their relationships with internal and external stakeholder groups were interviewed from among functions/departments of public relations, human resource management, community outreach, student services, courses and examination office, and the ombudsperson who plays an intermediary role between employees and employer in case of conflict. Findings suggest that for this higher education organization, on one hand, USR is understood mainly as stakeholder aid and Christian engagement benefitting employees, students, and community members according to specific needs. On the other hand, USR also is understood in terms of privacy protection and as a research driver that integrates openness, flexibility, and autonomy. Core components comprising USR are extension services, business incubation, student volunteer services, public relations activities, public works services, alumni relations, and employee outreach services. Means for communicating USR are face-to-face communication, partnerships, and mass media channels.

Details

Corporate Social Responsibility, Sustainability, and Ethical Public Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-585-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Nicola Jayne Williams-Burnett and Heather Skinner

The purpose of this paper is to present a critically reflective account of the process of conducting an impact evaluation of a dance-theatre company’s staged productions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a critically reflective account of the process of conducting an impact evaluation of a dance-theatre company’s staged productions and workshops.

Design/methodology/approach

There are two main approaches: the introspective critical reflection on the process of performing an impact evaluation; and the drawing/colouring methods used to perform it.

Findings

It is more difficult to provide impact evaluations of the soft rather than hard outcomes of publicly funded performance arts. The engagement of third-party evaluators may help overcome the challenge that many “accepted” approaches are outwith the skill or financial resources of smaller non-profit organisations.

Research limitations/implications

Although based on a single case, the authors believe that the evidence how the use of innovative methodologies may be more appropriate to performing arts impact evaluations, even those less familiar to management researchers.

Practical implications

This paper offers insights into various methods of impact evaluation that may be of use to smaller non-profit arts organisations who may be constrained by limited skills and financial resources.

Originality/value

This paper provides an original contribution to understanding innovative methodologies to perform arts impact evaluations, particularly those assessing soft outcomes, and a contribution in recognising the role of academic researchers in performing such evaluations.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2015

Bita A. Kash, Kayla M. Cline, Stephen Timmons, Rahil Roopani and Thomas R. Miller

Health care institutions in many Western countries have developed preoperative testing and assessment guidelines to improve surgical outcomes and reduce cost of surgical…

Abstract

Purpose

Health care institutions in many Western countries have developed preoperative testing and assessment guidelines to improve surgical outcomes and reduce cost of surgical care. The aims of this chapter are to (1) summarize the literature on the effect of preoperative testing on clinical outcomes, efficiency, and cost; and (2) to compare preoperative testing guidelines developed in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

We reviewed the literature from 1975 to 2014 for studies and preoperative testing guidelines.

Findings

We identified 29 empirical studies and 8 country-specific guidelines for review. Most studies indicate that preoperative testing is overused and comes at a high cost. Guidelines are tied to payment only in one country studied. This is the most recent review of the literature on preoperative testing and assessment with a focus on quality of care, efficiency, and cost outcomes. In addition, this chapter provides an international comparison of preoperative guidelines.

Details

International Best Practices in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-278-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Adah-Kole Emmanuel Onjewu, Arun Sukumar, K. V. D. Prakash and Mohamed Yacine Haddoud

Based on a single case approach, this chapter empirically explores the triple helix configuration of Centurion University of Technology and Management (CUTM) and its

Abstract

Based on a single case approach, this chapter empirically explores the triple helix configuration of Centurion University of Technology and Management (CUTM) and its social innovation programme. The study uses case files and web available material to consider the nature of the university’s relationship with industry and government. The findings show that triple helix social innovation has yet to be studied in an Indian context. Also, CUTM’s human and social orientation is a driver of its triple helix interaction. The university’s pursuit and trust in employers’ participation in the curriculum and campus experience is the hallmark of its social and pedagogic success. To advance the literature, this chapter draws attention to a much-overlooked Indian context and, for practitioners, it demonstrates the inner-workings of a functioning triple helix system.

Details

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Nicky Phillips, Paul Leighton and Rhona Sargeant

This paper seeks to report upon psychiatric trainees' experience of providing psychodynamic therapy for the first time and their experience of group supervision.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to report upon psychiatric trainees' experience of providing psychodynamic therapy for the first time and their experience of group supervision.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of five trainees, undertaking training in psychodynamic therapies, were interviewed on multiple occasions over an 18‐month period – before, during, and after undertaking their first case of psychodynamic therapy. A semi‐structured, qualitative interview approach was used to explore providing psychodynamic psychotherapy and participating in psychodynamic supervision groups. Interviews were transcribed in full and data analysed following the conventions of thematic analysis.

Findings

Trainees' anxieties about working psychodynamically and their concerns for developing new competencies are recognised. Personal and professional challenges associated with this therapeutic approach are identified and the importance of ”looking after” trainees is stressed; the role of trainee supervision groups in this is advocated. The potential challenges of integrating psychodynamic thinking into general psychiatric practice are discussed and suggestions to address these difficulties are proposed.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size reflects the total number of trainees participating in training at the time of the study; for future work, a larger sample drawn from multiple training centres would be recommended.

Originality/value

Training in psychotherapy is now mandatory for all trainee psychiatrists and this is something which many trainees find daunting; training in psychodynamic techniques is particularly challenging. A fuller awareness and understanding of trainees' experiences is important in nurturing clinicians who are competent in psychodynamic thinking, and who might consequently apply these skills clinically.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2007

P. Geetha Rani

The paper critically examines the program on Education for All (EFA) in India, namely Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA) in a financing and development framework. In doing so…

Abstract

The paper critically examines the program on Education for All (EFA) in India, namely Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA) in a financing and development framework. In doing so, the paper identifies a number of policy and implementation gaps in the program. A fine-tuning of the existing matching shares by discriminating the matching shares in terms of need for, ability to provide matching shares and to strengthen the absorptive capacity could go a long way in attaining the horizontal equity in terms of every child completing elementary schooling in India. This would also ensure the other desirable principles of intergovernmental transfers such as predictability, transparency, and incentive mechanism besides improving utilization.

Further, it clearly emerges that only after ensuring the basic minimum levels in terms of physical and human infrastructure, and ensuring equal access to all the child population of age group of 6–14, quality is given priority. Thus, the challenge is both improving the qualitative and quantitative targets of UEE with enhanced resource allocation to education. Hence, Center is to ensure release of funding for SSA through special efforts as the program requires enormous funding and serious commitment of both central and state governments.

On the developmental aspects, the scheme not only widens social inequity but also perpetuates the declining quality of public provision by encouraging alternate schools and para teachers, besides the financing norms. These low-cost options will result in serious ramifications on equity, quality, balance, and sustainability of the basic education structure.

Details

Education for All
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1441-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Financial Issues in Emerging Economies: Special Issue Including Selected Papers from II International Conference on Economics and Finance, 2019, Bengaluru, India
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-960-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Hannah Forsyth

The purpose of this paper is to consider the national and international political-economic environment in which Australian university research grew. It considers the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the national and international political-economic environment in which Australian university research grew. It considers the implications of the growing significance of knowledge to the government and capital, looking past institutional developments to also historicise the systems that fed and were fed by the universities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the extensive archival research in the National Archives of Australia and the Australian War Memorial on the formation and funding of a wide range of research programmes in the immediate post-war period after the Second World War. These include the Australian Atomic Energy Commission, the NHMRC, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, the Australian Pacific Territories Research Council, the Commonwealth Office of Education, the Universities Commission and the Murray review. This research was conducted under the Margaret George Award for emerging scholars for a project entitled “Knowledge, Nation and Democracy in Post-War Australia”.

Findings

After the Second World War, the Australian Government invested heavily in research: funding that continued to expand in subsequent decades. In the USA, similar government expenditure affected the trajectory of capitalist democracy for the remainder of the twentieth century, leading to a “military-industrial complex”. The outcome in Australia looked quite different, though still connected to the structure and character of Australian political economics.

Originality/value

The discussion of the spectacular growth of universities after the Second World War ordinarily rests on the growth in enrolments. This paper draws on a very large literature review as well as primary research to offer new insights into the connections between research and post-war political and economic development, which also explain university growth.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

Keywords

1 – 10 of 56