Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Richard A. Gray

Plato and Aristotle would have found the modern effort to fuse ethics and ecology to be incomprehensible. Despite the fact that oikos—meaning house or household—is a Greek…

Abstract

Plato and Aristotle would have found the modern effort to fuse ethics and ecology to be incomprehensible. Despite the fact that oikos—meaning house or household—is a Greek word, Greek science did not entertain a concept of ecology. Nor did Greek philosophy regard nature as morally considerable. Etymology aside, the word ecology in anything like its modern sense of “biospheric house” did not appear in European thought until 1873 when Ernst Heinrich Haeckel, a German biologist and philosopher, used it, with the spelling “Oekologie,” in his The History of Creation. Furthermore, the words “ecology” and “ecological” always had exclusive reference, until quite recently, to a scientific discipline and not to a branch of philosophy. As with the Classical Greek philosophers, so it was also with modern thinkers. Ethics, they held, were concerned solely with interpersonal relations. They could not, therefore, recognize a duty to nature. That we do owe a duty to nature, however, is the carefully considered conclusion of most of the environmental ethicists.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Benedette Palazzola

Conventional wisdom holds that the art of dance is strictly and in all its aspects a phenomenon of the moment, something adequately captured by pictorial means only, and…

Abstract

Conventional wisdom holds that the art of dance is strictly and in all its aspects a phenomenon of the moment, something adequately captured by pictorial means only, and not by the written word. Reading and writing are thought to have little or nothing to do with the ephemeral magic of the art of dance. This attitude has its roots in a time before film and video technologies made more possible the vivid preservation of choreography; it also has its roots in a time before the importance of preserving our unique modern dance heritage became fully evident.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1985

LESLIE R BALDWIN, BRIAN REDFERN, OWEN SURRIDGE, TERRY HANSTOCK, TONY WARSHAW, EDWIN FLEMING, ALLAN BUNCH and WILFRED ASHWORTH

While I agree with the broad theme of Jane Little's article in June NLW that there are not enough women in senior library posts, I feel that at least some of her points…

Abstract

While I agree with the broad theme of Jane Little's article in June NLW that there are not enough women in senior library posts, I feel that at least some of her points must be challenged.

Details

New Library World, vol. 86 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Paul J. Taylor and Ian Donald

This paper outlines 4 assumptions behind attempts to explain the sequential organization of communication behavior during conflict. These assumptions were supported by an…

Abstract

This paper outlines 4 assumptions behind attempts to explain the sequential organization of communication behavior during conflict. These assumptions were supported by an analysis of behavioral sequences coded from 9 hostage negotiations and 20 divorce mediations. Analyses showed that negotiators use only a small proportion of available responses to other party's behavior, and that this proportion rapidly decreases as sequence length increases. Critical to this channeling in behavior was the triple‐interact (i.e., cue‐response‐cue‐response), which represents the maximum sequence length required to enable accurate prediction of negotiators' future behavior. More detailed analysis showed that the triple‐interact reduced uncertainty in behavior by over 70%, which compares to less than 1% from knowledge of negotiation context and approximately 10% from knowledge of individual differences.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

George K. Stylios

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects…

Abstract

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Paul M. Taylor, D.M. Pollett and M.T. Grieβer

Describes one of the most frequently occurring processes in automated garment manufacture – the picking and placing of fabric panels. This can be carried out using pinch…

Abstract

Describes one of the most frequently occurring processes in automated garment manufacture – the picking and placing of fabric panels. This can be carried out using pinch grippers which comprise two pegs that are pushed down on to the top of the fabric. The pegs are then brought together so that the fabric buckles up and is secured between them. It is essential that this operation has very high reliability and repeatability as an error can result in distorted, badly placed or misaligned fabric panels, which would then lead to the production of a faulty garment. The important parameters are the frictional characteristics of the peg surface/supporting surfaces combined with the weight and bending stiffness of the fabric, the opening distance of the pegs and the downward pressure applied to them. Describes a model for these relationships and uses experimental data on frictional and bending properties to predict the gripping behaviour for a given gripper design and gripping strategy. The predictions are compared with experimental results.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Paul J. Taylor

This paper examines whether patterns in communication behavior over time can predict the outcome of crisis negotiations. A sample of 189 interaction episodes was…

Abstract

This paper examines whether patterns in communication behavior over time can predict the outcome of crisis negotiations. A sample of 189 interaction episodes was transcribed from 9 resolved negotiations and coded according to differences in the degree and type of behavior. Partial order scalogram analysis (POSAC) was used to produce a graphical representation of the similarities and differences among episodes while simultaneously uncovering the role of each behavior in shaping the negotiation process. Results showed that episodes could be represented along a partially ordered scale of competitiveness, which was structured by the occurrence of two types of behavior: Distributive‐Expressive and Integrative‐Instrumental. The likelihood of negotiation success reduced with movement up the competitive scale, and negotiations involving episodes that passed a threshold of extreme competition on the scale inevitably ended unsuccessfully regardless of future developments. As negotiations developed over time, behavior alternated between periods of increasing cooperation and periods of increasing competition, with unsuccessful negotiations associated with a concluding trend of increasing competitive behavior.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1901

If additional evidence were needed of the connection between food supply and the spread of infectious disease, it would be found in a report recently presented to the…

Abstract

If additional evidence were needed of the connection between food supply and the spread of infectious disease, it would be found in a report recently presented to the Finsbury Borough Council by its Medical Officer of Health, Dr. GEORGE NEWMAN. It appears that in the early part of May a number of cases of scarlet fever were notified to Dr. NEWMAN, and upon inquiry being made it was ascertained that nearly the whole of these cases had partaken of milk from a particular dairy. A most pains‐taking investigation was at once instituted, and the source of the supply was traced to a farm in the Midlands, where two or three persons were found recovering from scarlet fever. The wholesale man in London, to whom the milk was consigned, at first denied that any of this particular supply had been sent to shops in the Finsbury district, but it was eventually discovered that one, or possibly two, churns had been delivered one morning, with the result that a number of persons contracted the disease. One of the most interesting points in Dr. NEWMAN'S report is that three of these cases, occurring in one family, received milk from a person who was not a customer of the wholesale dealer mentioned above. It transpired on the examination of this last retailer's servants that on the particular morning on which the infected churn of milk had been sent into Finsbury, one of them, running short, had borrowed a quart from another milkman, and had immediately delivered it at the house in which these three cases subsequently developed. The quantity he happened to borrow was a portion of the contents of the infected churn.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Patrick Ragains

Blues music is in the midst of its second revival in popularity in roughly thirty years. The year 1960 can be identified, with some qualification, as a reference point for…

Abstract

Blues music is in the midst of its second revival in popularity in roughly thirty years. The year 1960 can be identified, with some qualification, as a reference point for the first rise in international awareness and appreciation of the blues. This first period of wide‐spread white interest in the blues continued until the early seventies, while the current revival began in the middle 1980s. During both periods a sizeable literature on the blues has appeared. This article provides a thumbnail sketch of the popularity of the blues, followed by a description of scholarly and critical literature devoted to the music. Documentary and instructional materials in audio and video formats are also discussed. Recommendations are made for library collections and a list of selected sources is included at the end of the article.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2011

Paul Taylor

The paper aims to introduce this special issue on LEAD, the research management system under which the papers collected in this issue were produced. The paper explains the…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to introduce this special issue on LEAD, the research management system under which the papers collected in this issue were produced. The paper explains the background that led to the establishment of the system, presents a short history of LEAD, describes how it is managed, and details the various stages of a typical LEAD “cycle”. It concludes with a brief description of the papers to follow.

Design/methodology/approach

Reflective description.

Findings

LEAD is a successful collaborative system for organising “action research” in learning and teaching within a business faculty. The papers in this issue serve to demonstrate the system's outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is essentially descriptive. The described system illustrates one way of organising collaborative research in a university faculty, in this instance focused on research into learning and teaching in a business faculty.

Practical implications

LEAD provides a model for managing collaborative university research, one that could be applied in any university faculty and across different research areas. Apart from illustrating the potential of the system, each of the papers collected in this issue is of interest in its own right, as a study of learning and teaching in a particular disciplinary context.

Originality/value

The LEAD system is a novel way of organising learning and teaching research in a university context.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000