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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Paul R Hottinger, Natalie M Zagami-Lopez and Alexandra S Bryndzia

This paper aims to provide an understanding of the experience of developing instruction to first-year-experience (FYE) students by introducing multiple library resources in 20…

1315

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an understanding of the experience of developing instruction to first-year-experience (FYE) students by introducing multiple library resources in 20 minutes.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduce FYE students to library resources using activity-based learning models. Using activity-based learning models, FYE students at Cal Poly Pomona, in Pomona, California, were introduced to multiple library resources that were woven into major library resources that fulfilled FYE competencies.

Findings

This paper demonstrates that librarians can effectively conduct library instruction to introduce FYE students to the core library resources in a 20-minute breakout session without the use of written assessments.

Originality/value

This paper would be beneficial for academic librarians developing library instruction for FYE students. The instruction designed within this paper provides useful examples for teaching information literacy for limited time, one-shot sessions and semester-long library instruction courses, using active teaching and learning methods that call for student participation and engagement.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1947

OUR good custom, as we deem it, to wish our readers a larger measure of happiness and success than heretofore we repeat for 1947. There are many signs in the libraries to give…

Abstract

OUR good custom, as we deem it, to wish our readers a larger measure of happiness and success than heretofore we repeat for 1947. There are many signs in the libraries to give encouragement to the hope that they, the libraries, are now so well established everywhere that the old evils of complete disregard, penury and restriction will not recur and that, gradually but surely, the aims and the purpose for which we stand will be realized. That they may be so for all readers of The Library World is, we believe, the best possible New Year wish.

Details

New Library World, vol. 49 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Tessa Withorn, Jillian Eslami, Hannah Lee, Maggie Clarke, Carolyn Caffrey, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Anthony Andora, Amalia Castañeda, Alexandra Mitchell, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Wendolyn Vermeer and Aric Haas

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of…

5754

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2020.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 440 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested in a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Stephen Lloyd

– This paper aims to enrich discussion on pilgrimage tourism by analyzing motivations for visiting Sissinghurst, and of essential components of the pilgrimage experience.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to enrich discussion on pilgrimage tourism by analyzing motivations for visiting Sissinghurst, and of essential components of the pilgrimage experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes data triangulation and the application of two powerful Jungian archetypes to decode motivations to manage and to participate in a journey to an iconic pilgrimage site (Sigginghurst Castle Garden, in Kent, England and administered by the National Trust) using the analysis of interview-based, published, broadcast media and internet blog storytelling.

Findings

Pilgrim tourists seek and achieve individuation by being part of the essential experience of a site; with its founders, its owners and management and with its continuing re-birth story.

Research limitations/implications

The paper illustrates the application of Jungian archetypes to identify motivations to engage in a tourism experience and as a means for managers to identify a destination's essential characteristics.

Practical implications

This work provides a means for managers to identify a destination's essential characteristics.

Originality/value

The paper documents an original research approach to a previously under-researched research topic.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Donald Gates and Peter Steane

The purpose of this paper is to address questions policymakers, working in a global marketplace, might ask about ethical and theological considerations of ambiguities or…

1494

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address questions policymakers, working in a global marketplace, might ask about ethical and theological considerations of ambiguities or uncertainties of justice issues in the global markets in which they operate.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on earlier research and published works in examining four specific questions about ambiguities of justice, from ethical and theological perspectives, and their relevance for policymakers in the global marketplace.

Findings

Justice, including social justice, is a significant value impacting on decision and policymakers in government and other types of organizations in a global marketplace. However, the value “justice” exhibits ambiguity or uncertainty. Even if a claim that economic policies developed through prudential judgement are not subject to the moral or ethical code is accepted, it does not absolve individual participants in the policymaking and administrative processes from ethical and moral responsibility if the outcomes of the policies are deemed to be selfish and unjust.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited by the ability to examine all the literature in the field at a greater depth. However, this has been ameliorated by examining a sufficient sample of theological and social scientific literature and relating these to the writings of the theologian, Paul Tillich, on questions about the four ambiguities of justice.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful appraisal of the various social justice issues that might be encountered by managers working in a global marketplace. It provides some definitive alternatives from which policymakers may select a course of action for their organizations in individual and collective markets throughout the world.

Originality/value

An identified need is fulfilled in this paper in that it supports executives and managers who may have doubts about ethical and theological justice issues that arise through the policies adopted and processes employed in their operations in the global marketplace.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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