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1 – 10 of 177
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Paul Plummer and Michael Taylor

The aim of this paper is to engage with the translation and linking of the “scientific knowledge” of theory on local economic growth with the “practical knowledge” of, on…

2186

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to engage with the translation and linking of the “scientific knowledge” of theory on local economic growth with the “practical knowledge” of, on the one hand, local economic policy formulation and, on the other hand, entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship education. The paper uses theoretically informed empirical modelling to identify and prioritise the drivers of local economic growth using data for Australia. The analyses demonstrate the significance of human capital and an enterprise culture in promoting local employment growth. From these results it is suggested that “bottom up” entrepreneurial education and related, but more “top down”, enterprise facilitation are practical mechanisms for achieving such local growth. These results suggest the great importance of translating “scientific knowledge” into “practical knowledge” to allow communities to engage with the knowledge economy.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Michael Taylor and Paul Plummer

A question that currently confronts economic policy practitioners is how to promote local economic growth in regions, cities and places, in a neo‐liberal political climate…

2668

Abstract

A question that currently confronts economic policy practitioners is how to promote local economic growth in regions, cities and places, in a neo‐liberal political climate under conditions of intensifying global competition. This paper argues that we need to understand the workings of our local economies – the processes that shape, mould and drive place‐based communities of business owners, manager, workers, bureaucrats and families. Identifies, validates and prioritises the drivers of local economic growth recognised in a range of theories, using econometric modelling and fine‐grained empirical data. The intention is only to begin a discussion on what are appropriate policies to foster local growth in the face of globalisation.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 45 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

David Cooperman and Paul Plummer

It is quite possible to use the cluster of conventional service terms without further specification, (service jobs, service sectors, service economy), as long as no…

Abstract

It is quite possible to use the cluster of conventional service terms without further specification, (service jobs, service sectors, service economy), as long as no rigorous empirical theories are intended and as long as data aggregated under that category is likewise not mobilised on behalf of explanation claims. Hence, data published by any number of sources classifies economic activity with reference to agriculture, manufacturing and services, in which services is a residual category. However, the researcher using such data comparatively is at risk since the residuals included in “services” are apt to be the least standardised of all the grossly aggregated data. Where “services” is used as an empty nominal term to stand for other itemised subcategories of service, the term is redundant. Hence, in a recent semi‐popular article, after noting that the term may indeed be so broad as to signify “anything sold in trade that could not be dropped on your foot”, a specification of sub‐categories is given which includes financial services, communication and transportation services, and distribution and retail networks, “among others”, which latter then becomes a rather sizable, unspecified residual itself. (Quinn, Baruch, Paquette 1987).

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 9 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Judit Takács and Ivett Szalma

This paper seeks to answer the practical question whether the institutionalisation level of same‐sex relationships can affect the social acceptance of lesbian women and…

2554

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to answer the practical question whether the institutionalisation level of same‐sex relationships can affect the social acceptance of lesbian women and gay men in Europe, and highlight some of the factors that can potentially determine the incidence of homophobia in 26 European countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study contributes to the literature on acceptance of lesbian women and gay men in Europe by using the European Social Survey dataset, focusing especially on a key variable measuring the agreement level with the statement that gay men and lesbians should be free to live their own life as they wish. For data analyses, explanatory models were constructed by applying multilevel mixed‐effects linear regression.

Findings

The study presented empirically tested arguments that the introduction of same‐sex partnership legislation can lead to a decrease of anti‐gay/lesbian attitudes, as has happened in the European countries examined in this study.

Research limitations/implications

Future research in more societies is needed to examine the long‐term effects of the introduction of same‐sex partnership legislation on homophobia.

Social implications

A key policy implication of highlighting that the provision of equal rights for gay and lesbian citizens in the form of same‐sex marriage and registered partnership can positively influence attitudes, is to urge policy‐makers to introduce these legal frameworks in order to create a more inclusive society.

Originality/value

The content presented in this paper is based on the authors’ own original research.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2005

Laura Fingerson

How do researchers capture children's and adolescents’ cultures and peer interactions? Ethnography, as argued by several sociologists including Corsaro (1996), is indeed a…

Abstract

How do researchers capture children's and adolescents’ cultures and peer interactions? Ethnography, as argued by several sociologists including Corsaro (1996), is indeed a valuable method for understanding everyday life. However, what about issues that are sensitive? What about issues that are salient in the lives of children and adolescents, yet are not talked about in settings generally accessible to researchers such as schools, youth groups, community centers, and extracurricular programs? Family issues such as divorce, for example, might be highly salient in a child's life, yet not talked about during school lunch in front of an adult researcher. Children talk with their friends and peers about divorce, share stories and experiences with divorce, and interpret the meanings of divorce in groups.

Details

Sociological Studies of Children and Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-256-6

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

DAVID N. LABAND, BERNARD F. LENTZ and JOHN P. SOPHOCLEUS

Family traditions in business operations are common throughout recorded history. From an economic perspective, occupational following may occur voluntarily because…

Abstract

Family traditions in business operations are common throughout recorded history. From an economic perspective, occupational following may occur voluntarily because valuable, job‐specific human capital, which is transferred at low cost from one generation to the next, raises the son's expected return of following in his father's footsteps. Moreover, to the extent family name is utilized as a screening device for entry into restricted occupations, sons may have a double inducement to follow.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

Abstract

Details

Developing Leaders for Positive Organizing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-241-1

Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Kirsi Snellman and Gabriella Cacciotti

The purpose of this chapter is to explore whether and how angel investors’ emotions unfold in the investment opportunity evaluation process as they interact with the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to explore whether and how angel investors’ emotions unfold in the investment opportunity evaluation process as they interact with the social environment. Complementing recent research that has emphasized the financial calculations, we add angel investors’ own emotional arousal to the list of tools that may help them to rate investment opportunities.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Drawing on semi-structured qualitative interviews, we develop a phenomenological analysis of the investment opportunity evaluation process at the level of angel investors’ lived experience.

Findings

Our findings indicate that when angel investors use their emotional arousal in evaluating investment criteria, they engage in a developmental process characterized by three elements: subjective validation, social validation, and investment decision.

Research Limitations/Implications

We illuminate how discrete emotions can complement rational considerations in the opportunity evaluation journey. Capturing the nature of emotion as action oriented, embodied, socially situated, and distributed, we embrace its adaptive socially situated dynamics.

Practical Implications

Taking a step toward better understanding of the soft aspects in the relationship development that leads to investments, we hope this study will help not only those entrepreneurs who need funding but also those policymakers who design new incentives that improve the flow of investment into promising new ventures.

Originality/Value

We demonstrate how angel investors’ emotions can complement their rational considerations in the investment opportunity evaluation process as they interact with the social environment. Identifying boundary values for the conditions that are necessary and sufficient to advance in the process, we have demonstrated how emotion can serve as a driving or restraining force not only during subjective validation but also during social validation.

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Kate P. Nurser, Imogen Rushworth, Tom Shakespeare and Deirdre Williams

Creating more positive individual narratives around illness and identity is at the heart of the mental health care recovery movement. Some recovery services explicitly use…

1098

Abstract

Purpose

Creating more positive individual narratives around illness and identity is at the heart of the mental health care recovery movement. Some recovery services explicitly use personal storytelling as an intervention. The purpose of this paper is to look at individual experiences of a personal storytelling intervention, a recovery college Telling My Story (TMS) course.

Design/methodology/approach

Eight participants who had attended the TMS course offered at a UK recovery college were interviewed. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Findings

Five key themes, namely a highly emotional experience, feeling safe to disclose, renewed sense of self, two-way process and a novel opportunity, were emerged.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that storytelling can be a highly meaningful experience and an important part of the individual’s recovery journey. They also begin to identify elements of the storytelling process which might aid recovery, and point to pragmatic setting conditions for storytelling interventions to be helpful. More time could be dedicated to individuals telling their story within UK mental health services, and the authors can use this insight into the experience of personal storytelling to guide any future developments.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 April 2014

Sara Delamont and Paul Atkinson

A great deal of contemporary research in education, and in the social sciences more generally, is conducted through interviews. Interview-derived accounts and narratives…

Abstract

A great deal of contemporary research in education, and in the social sciences more generally, is conducted through interviews. Interview-derived accounts and narratives have been used as data for many decades. We argue that, despite their popularity and their long history, such data are not always subjected to rigorous analysis. Researchers too often treat interviews as sources of insight about informants’ experiences and feelings, but pay insufficient attention to the forms and functions of such accounts. We argue that they need to be approached through the analytic lens of accounting devices and narrative structures. We exemplify this approach through ‘academic’ narratives: scientists’ discovery accounts and accounts of doctoral supervision. We emphasise how such accounts need to be examined in terms of the discursive construction of reality. Such an approach is an important corrective to the selective reporting of ‘atrocity stories’ about postgraduate education.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research II
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-823-5

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