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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Paul Magrath

In the case of Regina v Tunbridge Wells Health Authority, Ex parte Goodridge and Others, the 24 doctors comprising the General Practitioner Committee of the Tonbridge…

Abstract

In the case of Regina v Tunbridge Wells Health Authority, Ex parte Goodridge and Others, the 24 doctors comprising the General Practitioner Committee of the Tonbridge Cottage Hospital successfully challenged a decision, taken by the Tunbridge Wells Health Authority on 12th January, 1988, and confirmed on 29th March, 1988, to close the hospital temporarily from 1st April, 1988, in order to accommodate budget costs.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Paul Magrath

Prendergast v Sam & Dee Ltd was apparently the first case in which a patient, who had suffered injury after being given the wrong medication, successfully sued not only…

Abstract

Prendergast v Sam & Dee Ltd was apparently the first case in which a patient, who had suffered injury after being given the wrong medication, successfully sued not only the pharmacist who dispensed the wrong medication but also the doctor whose illegibly written prescription had misled the pharmacist. In all previous cases of this nature, only the pharmacist has been held liable. Subject to any reversal by the Court of Appeal or the House of Lords, this High Court decision represents a landmark in the law of medical negligence.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Paul Magrath

The case of C v S made legal history, in more ways than one. Less than a week passed between the opening of the plaintiff's case before the judge at first instance and the…

Abstract

The case of C v S made legal history, in more ways than one. Less than a week passed between the opening of the plaintiff's case before the judge at first instance and the final dismissal of the plaintiff's appeal by the House of Lords — probably the shortest time a case has ever travelled through the UK judicial system. This was due, notwithstanding the complexity of the medical and legal issues involved, to the extreme urgency of the application. For this was the case in which the putative father of an 18‐week foetus applied for an injunction to restrain the mother, and the health authority concerned, from proceeding with an abortion. He did not succeed. Had he done so, however, the effect might have been catastrophic, since it would effectively place anyone involved in the administration of abortion under the threat of prosecution for a criminal offence (child destruction) carrying a maximum penalty of life imprisonment.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Diana M.R. Tribe and Gill Korgaonkar

This, the first of three papers, provides an overview of the law of negligence as it affects medical practitioners in the UK. The standard of care owed by doctors to…

Abstract

This, the first of three papers, provides an overview of the law of negligence as it affects medical practitioners in the UK. The standard of care owed by doctors to patients is considered in the light of recent increases in malpractice claims, the escalating cost of medical insurance and current Government proposals for Crown indemnity.

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Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Elisabeth Paul, Oriane Bodson and Valéry Ridde

The study aims to explore the theoretical bases justifying the use of performance-based financing (PBF) in the health sector in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to explore the theoretical bases justifying the use of performance-based financing (PBF) in the health sector in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a scoping review of the literature on PBF so as to identify the theories utilized to underpin it and analyzed its theoretical justifications.

Findings

Sixty-four studies met the inclusion criteria. Economic theories were predominant, with the principal-agent theory being the most commonly-used theory, explicitly referred to by two-thirds of included studies. Psychological theories were also common, with a wide array of motivation theories. Other disciplines in the form of management or organizational science, political and social science and systems approaches also contributed. However, some of the theories referred to contradicted each other. Many of the studies included only casually alluded to one or more theories, and very few used these theories to justify or support PBF. No theory emerged as a dominant, consistent and credible justification of PBF, perhaps except for the principal-agent theory, which was often inappropriately applied in the included studies, and when it included additional assumptions reflecting the contexts of the health sector in LMICs, might actually warn against adopting PBF.

Practical implications

Overall, this review has not been able to identify a comprehensive, credible, consistent, theoretical justification for using PBF rather than alternative approaches to health system reforms and healthcare providers' motivation in LMICs.

Originality/value

The theoretical justifications of PBF in the health sector in LMICs are under-documented. This review is the first of this kind and should encourage further debate and theoretical exploration of the justifications of PBF.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2003

Audhesh K. Paswan

This study empirically explores one of the important channel issues – the relationship between various channel support given to channel partners and the perceived (by…

Abstract

This study empirically explores one of the important channel issues – the relationship between various channel support given to channel partners and the perceived (by managers) goal‐orientation of a firm. Results from an emerging market, India, indicate that perceived orientation towards both profitability and market share is not associated with any of the channel support considered. Growth orientation however is strongly associated with most of the channel support activities – both business (e.g., business advice, pricing and ordering assistance, and personnel training) as well as marketing (advertising support, sales promotional material, and inventory management assistance) oriented activities. In contrast, perceived sales volume orientation is only associated with advertising support and business advice, however, the relationship is negative. These findings have interesting implications for channel management and channel motivation.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Stan Cromie, John Adams, Barbara Dunn and Renee Reid

Family firms account for around 75 per cent of all business enterprises in the UK, but there is a lack of research on these businesses. The family firms literature…

Abstract

Family firms account for around 75 per cent of all business enterprises in the UK, but there is a lack of research on these businesses. The family firms literature recognises that there are differences between family and non‐family businesses; differences that can be explained by conflicts between a juxtaposition of family values and business values. Consequently, family firms tend to have different approaches to ownership and control, the composition of boards, employment practices, strategy formulation and succession management. This paper reports on the demographic characteristics, ownership configurations, boardroom arrangements, managerial and succession practices of a random selection of 1,065 family firms located in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Results reveal that the firms are well‐established, privately owned, small businesses in which the lead family retains almost all shares and dominates the board of directors. These firms give some preferential treatment to family members in employment and managerial matters but business objectives are not ignored. In keeping with previous research, succession matters are not regularly discussed and much more needs to be done to allow for a smooth transition from one family generation to another. The authors conclude by arguing that there is an urgent need for policy makers to address the problems and needs of small family firms and to develop frameworks and practices for assisting these businesses.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Abstract

Details

Running, Identity and Meaning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-367-0

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Justin Paul

“Masstige marketing” is considered as a market penetration strategy for medium and large enterprises, particularly in foreign markets. The author redefine “masstige…

Abstract

Purpose

“Masstige marketing” is considered as a market penetration strategy for medium and large enterprises, particularly in foreign markets. The author redefine “masstige marketing” strategy in this paper and map the concept as a new model for brand building. Second, the author examine the effectiveness of “masstige marketing” strategy with reference to marketing mix theory (Four Ps=product, price, place and promotion). The purpose of this paper is to introduce a theoretical model to help the companies to implement “masstige marketing” strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The author introduce a scale, called “Masstige Mean Score Scale” to measure the mass prestige value of brands. Both secondary and primary data used in this study. The author collected data from 590 young women consumers living in Japan and France to measure the “masstige” value using the new scale developed. The marketing strategy of European luxury sector multinational brand LV, has also been discussed as a method.

Findings

Masstige value is the best indicator of long-term brand value. In other words, higher the masstige value (MMS) of a brand, the higher the likelihood to succeed. The author also found that a brand can create mass prestige with “masstige marketing” strategy by appropriately mixing the four Ps in marketing – Product, Price, Promotion and Place in a distinct and culturally different market.

Originality/value

The author develop a pyramid model and measurement scale for “masstige marketing” as a theoretical framework to stimulate further research and as a tool for practitioners for better decision making. Besides, the author posit that higher the Masstige Mean Score (MMS) of a brand, higher the likelihood that potential customers recall that as a “top of mind” brand. Lower MMS implies that the firm has to go long way in their efforts to build the brand.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2021

Neil Baxter

Abstract

Details

Running, Identity and Meaning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-367-0

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