Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Jennifer Angela Pope, Paul Isely and Busuyi Agbetunsin

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the factors that influence the level of satisfaction or festival attendees and how that influences their intention to return. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the factors that influence the level of satisfaction or festival attendees and how that influences their intention to return. The impact of other factors such as past attendance and distance traveled to the festival were also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected using an online survey from attendees at a LaughFest™, a comedy festival hosted as a fund and awareness raiser for a non-profit organization (NPO) in a medium-sized Midwestern city. The data related to reasons for level of satisfaction and intention to return were coded into dichotomous variables, and along with income, gender and distance traveled to the event were analyzed using logistic regression.

Findings

Of the factors that impacted satisfaction, performers, venue, and ticket prices were found to have the largest impact on intention to return, with negative experiences having a greater impact than positive. Previous attendance was also significant with regard to intention to return.

Practical implications

This information will allow this festival’s managers to target specific areas for improvement to increase the rate of repeat attendance.

Originality/value

This paper aims to contribute to the literature addressing specific factors influencing level of satisfaction and how those factors impact intention to return by examining them in a comedy festival that is also a fund and awareness raiser for a local NPO. There are few studies examining this aspect in regard to this particular type of festival.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Sandra Braman

This article aims to present an analysis of ideas and practices regarding governance of and by the network design process by participants in the technical design process

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to present an analysis of ideas and practices regarding governance of and by the network design process by participants in the technical design process during the first decade (1969-1979) as recorded in the technical document series that provides both the medium for and the history of that design process, the Internet RFCs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted via a comprehensive inductive and adductive reading of all of the publicly available documents in the series from its launch in October of 1969 through the close of 1979.

Findings

The findings show that internet designers were well aware that the infrastructure they were building was social as well as technical in nature. They were concerned about both governmental constraints on the design process (governance of) and about how protocol compliance could be achieved (governance by the network design process). As do informational states, network designers developed governance tools that affected the identity, structure, borders, and change in social, informational, and technological systems. The dual faces of network governance reveal tensions between the network political and the geopolitical.

Originality/value

This work contributes to our understanding of the interactions between the social and the technical in the course of the internet design process as it was expressed in concerns about governance by others and of others brought up in the course of resolving technical design problems. Methodologically, the research provides a model of one approach to analyzing the development of governance mechanisms and specific policies along sociotechnical boundaries.

Details

info, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Caroline Westwood, Peter Schofield and Graham Berridge

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the theory concerning visitor motivations, consumer experience and behavioural intentions at rural events; more specifically…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the theory concerning visitor motivations, consumer experience and behavioural intentions at rural events; more specifically, it focusses on agricultural shows, which have hitherto been neglected in the events management literature. These events have successfully broadened their visitor base, but not without the attendant challenges for agricultural events’ designers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a quantitative design using a questionnaire survey. The analysis, using a range of statistical procedures, centres on consumer motivation, experience and behaviour in relation to show features and their influence on future behaviour.

Findings

The findings of this paper demonstrates the relative importance to the consumer of the show’s various components and their influence on revisitation, which reflect the significance of social, cultural and personal meanings attached to their experiences. This highlights key motivational variables such as appreciating the shows’ traditions and intellectual enrichment.

Research limitations/implications

The study takes a cross-sectional approach, using a non-probability sample at four multi-day royal shows. Future research should establish the external validity of the findings and their applicability to smaller one-day agricultural shows.

Practical implications

The research provides a managerial contribution by informing show designers about the motivations of an increasingly diverse range of visitors. This will facilitate decisions around the engagement of contemporary design while preserving the traditional elements of agricultural shows.

Originality/value

Few studies have looked at rural events and, in particular, agricultural shows. Moreover, previous research in this area has focussed on rural tourism and place making, while consumer behaviour and experience at rural events has been neglected. This paper provides an insight into the consumer experience and perceived importance of various aspects of contemporary agricultural shows.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 November 2018

Mohammed Aboramadan

From one year to another, more researchers join in the ever-growing field of interest of non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Nevertheless, the literature on NGOs…

Abstract

Purpose

From one year to another, more researchers join in the ever-growing field of interest of non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Nevertheless, the literature on NGOs management is not as rich as what has been developed for private companies and bodies in the business world. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for managing NGOs effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviewing the literature on NGOs management from different areas, the paper proposes a conceptual framework.

Findings

The paper provides a conceptual framework on how different management functions are involved in a mutual framework for managing NGOs.

Research limitations/implications

The author needs to empirically test the suggested framework using qualitative and qualitative techniques.

Originality/value

The author’s perspective on NGOs management is a subject of great interest for different NGOs stakeholders including: donors, communities, volunteers, managers and policy-makers.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Alex Mitchell, Judith Madill and Samia Chreim

The purpose of this paper is to build understanding of the concept of social enterprise in the social marketing community and to report on empirical research designed to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build understanding of the concept of social enterprise in the social marketing community and to report on empirical research designed to develop an understanding the perceptions and practices of marketing within social enterprises. This addresses a significant gap in the current literature base and also provides insights for social marketers seeking to pursue social change initiatives through social enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical investigation uses a qualitative investigation of 15 social enterprises informed by a grounded theory approach. Researchers conducted interviews with senior decision-makers responsible for marketing activities and strategic policy, and gathered additional data regarding the organizations in the form of archival materials, including strategic planning documents, promotional materials and firm-generated online content.

Findings

Strategic marketing practices used by social enterprises are shaped by moral, pragmatic and cognitive legitimacy influences stemming from imperatives to achieve congruence with institutional norms. This study exposes the challenges social enterprises face in developing strategic marketing activities that address business needs, while balancing stakeholder interests linked to the social missions of such organizations.

Research limitations/implications

This qualitative study pursues depth of understanding through focused investigation of a small, regional sample of Canadian social enterprises. The findings demonstrate that social enterprises are similar to both not-for-profit and small- and medium-sized firms in terms of their marketing approaches, but face particular institutional legitimacy challenges when developing and implementing strategic marketing activities.

Practical implications

This paper highlights the influences of institutional legitimacy on marketing practices and approaches in social enterprises. Understanding these influences is crucial for social marketing practitioners, as they develop strategic activities. The findings from the research provide a baseline upon which to begin to build both our theoretical and practical understanding of the potential utilization of social marketing through social enterprises.

Social implications

Understanding the challenges social enterprises face in developing their strategic marketing activities provides deeper insights into social enterprises for social marketers, who might consider using social marketing in such organizations to achieve social change.

Originality/value

This paper offers empirical evidence grounded in depth investigations of 15 social enterprises operating in a Canadian context. The findings help to extend our understanding of the complex institutional influences impacting marketing practices within social enterprise organizations. These institutional influences help to attune social marketers to the potential opportunities and challenges of using social enterprise as an organizational form for launching social marketing programs.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5